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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Villas. It contains 34 families of Indians, whocultivate and trade in grain, pulse, coal, and thebark of trees. A little more than two leagues tothe w. with a slight inclination to the s. of its headsettlement.

Agustin, San, another setttlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman in Peru ; si-tuate on the shore of the river Tercero (third river.)

Agustin, San, another settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the king-dom of Guatemala.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the kingdom of Quito.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres in Peru, on the shoreof the river Ibiquay.

Agustin, San, another of the province andalcaldia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva España,situate near the town of Rosario.

Agustin, San, a point or cape of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Per-nambuco, between the port Antonio Vaz and theriver Tapado. One hundred leagues from thebay of Los Miiertos ; [300 miles n. e. from the bayof All Souls. Lat. 8° 38' s. Long. 35° 11' tc.]

Agustin, San, another point or cape of thecoast of the province and government of Rio deHacha, and kingdom of Tierra Firme, close to thelake of San Juan, on the e. side.

Agustin, San, a river of the province andgovernment of Antioquia, in the new kingdom ofGranada. It runs from s. to n. and afterwards,with a slight inclination to the w. enters the riverS. Juan, of the province of Choco.

Agustin, San, a small island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red Sea of Cortes ; situate in themost interior part of it, and near upon the coast ofNueva España, opposite the bay of San JuanBaptista.

[ AGWORTH, a township in Cheshire county.New Hampshire, incorporated in 1766, and con-tains 704 inhabitants ; eight miles e. by n. fromCharlestown, and 73n. w. by a), from Portsmouth.]

AHOME, a nation of Indians, who inhabit theshores of the river Zuaque, in the province ofCinaloa, and who are distant four leagues fromthe sea of California : they were converted to theCatholic faith by father Andres de Rivas, a Jesuit.Their country consists of some extensive and fer-tile plains, and they are by nature superior to theother Indians of Nueva España. Moreover, theirHeathenish customs do not partake so much of thespirit of barbarism. They abhorred polygamy,and held virginity in the highest estimation : andthus, by way of distinction, unmarried girls wore

a small shell suspended to their neck, until the dayof their nuptials, when it was taken off by the bride-groom. Their clothes were decent, composed ofwove cotton, and'they had a custom of bewailingtheir dead for a whole year, night and morning,with an apparently excessive grief. They aregentle and faithful towards the Spaniards, withwhom they have continued in peace and unityfrom the time of their first subjection. The prin-cipal settlement is of the same name, and lies atthe mouth of the river Fuerte, on the coast of thegulph of California,* having a good, convenient,and well sheltered port.

AHORCADOS, Point of the, on the shore ofthe large lake of Los Patos, of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil.

Ahorcados, some small islands or points onthe coast of the S. sea, in the district of SantaElena, of the province and government of Guay-aquil, close to the mouth of the river Colonche.

AHUACATEPEC, San Nicolas de, anothersettlement of the above head settlement and alcal-dia mayor.

AHUACATES, Santa Maria de, a branchof the head settlement of the district and alcaldiamayor of Cuernavaca in Nueva España.

AHUACATLAN, Santa Maria de, a set-tlement of the head settlement of the district ofSan Francisco del Talle, and alcaldia mayor ofZultepec, in Nueva España. It is of a cold tem-perature, inhabited by 51 families of Indians, anddistant three leagues s. of its head settlement.

Ahuacatlan (Zochicoatlan), another settlement of’the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan inNueva España. It is of a cold temperature, si-tuate on a small level plain, surrounded by hillsand mountains. It contains 13 families of In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. of its capital.

Ahuacatlan, with the dedicatory title of SanJuan, the head settlement of the district of thealcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in Nueva España.Its inhabitants are composed of 450 families ofIndians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mu-lattoes, including the settlements of the district.Five leagues from its capital, and separated by amountainous and rugged road, as also by a verybroad river, whose waters, in the winter time, in-crease to such a degree as to render all communi-cation between the above places impracticable.

Ahuacatlan, another, of the head settlementof the district of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa, in the above kingdom. It contains 160families of Indians, who trade in chia^ (a whitemedicinal earth), and grain, with which its territoryabounds. It lies n, w. of its head settlement.

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[boyes. or pretended magicians, sacrifices and wor-ship ; wounding themselves on such solemnitieswith an instrument made of the teeth of the agouti,which inflicted horrible gashes ; conceiving, per-haps, that the malignant powers delighted ingroans and misery, and were to be appeased onlyby human blood,]

Caribe, a settlement of the same province andgovernment ; situate on the windward coast of thecape of Tres Puntas. In its district are 26 plan-tations, 15 of cacao, and the rest of vines andmaize, which yield but indifferently, from a wantof water; although they find means of supplyingthis in some degree by the rain. The communityconsists of 1070 souls ; and is five leagues dis-tant from the settlement of Carupano.

(CARIBEANA, now called Paria or NewAndalucia, which see.)

CARIBES, a barbarous and ferocious nation ofIndians, who are cannibals, inhabiting the pro-vince which by them is called Caribana. Theyare divided under the titles of the Maritiraos andMediterraneos : the former live in plains and uponthe coast of the Atlantic, are contiguous to theDutch and French colonies, and follow the lawsand customs of the former, with whom they carryon a commerce. They are the most cruel of anythat infest the settlements of the missions of theriver Orinoco, and are the same as those calledGalibis. The Mediterraneos, who inhabit thes. side of the source of the river Caroni, are of amore pacific nature, and began to be reduced tothe faith by the regular order of the abolished so-ciety of the Jesuits in 1738, The name of Caribesis given not only to these and other Indians of theAntilles, but to all such as are cannibals. See Ca-ribe.

(CARIBOU, an island towards the e. end oflake Superior in N. America, n. w. of Cross cape,and s. w. of Montreal bay.)

CARICARI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paria in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Toledo.

Caricari, also called Laguacina, a point ofland on the coast of the province and governmentof the Rio del Hacha.

CARICHANA, a settlement of the province ofGuayana, and government of Cumana ; one of themissions of the Rio Meta, which was under thecare of the society of Jesuits, of the province ofSanta Fe. It is situate on the shore of the Ori-noco, by the torrent of its name ; and is at presentunder the care of the religious order of Capuchins.

Carichana, Torrent of, a strait of the river

Orinoco, formed by different islands, some coveredby, and some standing out of, the water, so thatthe navigation is very difficult and dangerous. Itis near the mouth of the river Meta.

CARIJANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Camata.

=CARILLON==, a fort belonging to the French,in New France.

(CARIMBATAY, a parish of the province andgovernment of Paraguay ; situate a little to then. w. of the town of Curuguaty. Lat. 24° 33' 35".Long. 55° 57' w.)

Carimbatay, a river of the above provinceand government, which runs w. and enters theXexuy near the town of Curuguato.

CARIMU, a small river of the province andcolony of the Dutch, in Surinam ; one of thosewhich enter the Cuium on the s. side.

CARINIS, a small river of the province andcaptainship of Para in Brazil. It rises in the coun-try of the Aritus Indians, runs e. and enters theGuiriri.

CARIOCOS, a lake of the country of the Ama-zonas, in the Portuguese territories, on the shoreof the river. It is formed by the Topinamba-ranas, which, according to Mr. Bellin, makes thissheet of water before it enters the former river.

CARIPE, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cumaná in the kingdom of TierraFirme, situate in the middle of a serranía; one ofthe missions in that province belonging to theAragonese Capuchin fathers.

CARIPORES, a settlement of S. America, tothe n. of Brazil and of the river of Las Amazo-nas : although of barbarian Indians, it deservesparticular mention, on account of its virtuous andpacific customs, so different from the brutality andsloth of the surrounding nations. These Indiansare handsome, lively, bold, valorous, liberal, ho-nest, and affable, and in short the most polishednation of Indians in all America ; they esteem ho-nour, justice, and truth; are enemies to deceit, eatbread made of cazave, which they have a methodof preserving good for three or four years. Theydo not scruple to eat the flesh of some ugly snakesfound in their woods, but are not cannibals ; nei-ther do they revenge upon their prisoners takenin war the cruelties they experience from theirenemies.

CARIUITOS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela in the kingdom of TierraFirrae.

(CARIY, a parish of the province and govern-

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an hermitage dedicated to St. Denis the Areopa-gite. It lies to the s. of the city of Barquisimeto,Between that of Tucuyo and the lake of Maracaibo.(Carora is 30 leagues to the s. of Coro. Its situa-tion owes nothing to nature but a salubrious air.Its soil, dry and covered with thorny plants, givesno other productions but such as owe almost en-tirely their existence to the principle of heat. Theyremark there a sort of cochineal silvestre as fine asthe misleca, which they suffer to perish. Theland is covered with prolific animals, such asoxen, mules, horses, sheep, goats, &c. ; and theactivity evinced by the inhabitants to make theseadvantageous to them, supports the opinion thatthere are but few cities in the Spanish West In-dies where there is so much industry as at Carora.The principal inhabitants live by the produce oftheir flocks, whilst the rest gain their livelihoodby tanning and selling the hides and skins. Al-though their tanning be bad, the consumer cannotreproach the manufacturer, for it is impossible toconceive how they can sell the article, whatevermay be its quality, at the moderate price it fetches.The skins and leather prepared at Carora are usedin a great degree by the inhabitants themselvesfor boots, shoes, saddles, bridles, and strops.The surplus of the consumption of the place isused throughout the province, or is sent to Ma-racaibo, Cartagena, and Cuba. They also manu-facture at Carora, from a sort of aloe disthica, veryexcellent hammocs, which form another article oftheir trade. These employments occupy andsupport a population of 6200 souls, who, with asterile soil, have been able to acquire that ease andcompetency which it appears to have been theintention of nature to deny them. The city is wellbuilt ; the streets are wide, running in straightparallel lines. The police and the administrationof justice are in the hands of a lieutenant of the go-vernor and a cabildo. There is no military au-thority. Carora lies in lat. 9° 50' n. and is 15leagues e. of the lake of Maracaibo, 12 n. ofTocuyo, IS n. w. of Barquisimeto, and 90 w. ofCaracas.)

Carora, a great llanura of the same province,which extends 16 leagues from e. to w, and sixfrom n. to s. It was discovered by George Spirain 1534, abounds greatly in every kind of grainand fruit, but is of a very hot temperature. Itspopulation is not larger than that of the former city,to which it gives its name.

CARORI, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore of theChirimichale, in the point of Hicacos.

(CAROUGE Point, the northernmost extremity

of the island of St. Domingo in the W. Indies ;25 miles n. from the town of St. Jago.)

CARPE, Island of the, in lake Superior ofNew France, between the n. coast and CapeBreton.

CARPINTO, Punta De, a point on the coastof the province and government of the Rio delHacha.

CARQUIN, a port of the coast of Peru andS. sea, in the province and corres^imiento of Chan-cay.

(CARR, a small plantation in Lincoln county,district of Maine.)

(CARRANTASCA Lagoon, or Cartago, isa large gulf on the s. side of the bay of Hon-duras, about 70 miles n. w. of cape Gracios aDios, and nearly as far s. e. from Brewer’s la-goon.)

CARRASCAL, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cuio in the kingdom of Chile;situate s. of the city of Mendoza, and on the shoreof the river of this name.

CARRETAS, Puerto de las, a port in thesierra of its name, in Nueva España,

CARRETO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena ; situate on the shore ofthe cano or dike near the sea-coast.

Carreto, a river of the province and govern-ment of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra Firme ; itrises in the mountains of the n, coast, and entersthe sea behind the bay of Calidonia.

CARRION DE Velazco, a small but beauti-ful and well peopled city of the kingdom of Peru,in the pleasant llanura of Guaura ; it is of a mild,pleasant, and healthy climate, of a fertile and de-lightful soil, and inhabited by a no small numberof distinguished and rich families.

CARRIZAL, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela; situate on the coast andpoint of Coro, to the n. of this city.

Carrizal, sierra or chain of mountains ofthe same province and government, which runsfrom e. to w. from the shore of the river Guaricoto the shore of the Guaya.

Carrizal, another settlement of the provinceand government of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situ-ate near a river, between the settlements of Bateguiand San Marcelo.

Carrizal, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Rancagua in the kingdom of Chile,to the s. of the city of Mendoza, and on the shoreof the river of this name.

Carrizal, another, of the province and go-vernment of the Rio del Hacha, situate on thecoast of the country of the Guajiros Indians, be-

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dried flesh, hung up to preserve them from corrup-tion. Their garments are a shirt without sleeves,reaching down to the middle of their legs. Themarried people wear drawers of baize with colouredpuckers for festival days, and those who enjoyoffices of state wear a baize jacket : they neitheruse hatnorshoes, and no one of them ever goes outwithout slinging round his neck some medals and arosary. The hair is worn short until they marry,and when they become old they suffer it to growlong. The women wear close gowns which reachdown to the ground, and which they call tapoyes:they never swathe or bind themselves round thewaist, but carry on their necks, on gala-days, somethreads strung with glass intermixed with beadsmade of cacao nuts, and coloured beans ; thesethreads usually amount to 20 or SO rows ; on en-tering the church they always loosen their hair.The regulars of the company of the Jesuits taughtthem offices, in which they assisted most dexte-rously ; and it really excites admiration that In-dians, acquainted only with their own barbariandialect, should be able to manage the compass ofthe notes, understand their proportions and num-bers, and apply the rules of music to its execution.At certain times of the year they go a mdear, orto hunt for honey among the woods : from thencethey bring back wax of two sorts, one which iswhite and odoriferous, Jhe other of less substance,as the wax of Europe, manufactured by a speciesof bees without stings, called opernus; also an-other kind of wax, made by a still different sort ofbees, but which are all properly denominated wildwax. This wax is delivered to the curate, whopreserves it in his house to send to the provinces ofPeru ; and from the product of this article, andfrom that of the cotton, which is made into woofs,to the amount of two pounds weight yearly byeach Indian, he procures in 3xchange whatever isnecessary for the settlement, such as baizes, colouredwools, bags, iron and steel articles, choppingknives, wedges, hatchets, scissars, pocket-knives,needles, medals, bugles, and other articles of hard-ware and little necessaries, which, being stored upby him, is distributed amongst the natives accord-ing to their necessities, and in a manner that theymay want for nothing, but live happy and con-tented. The settlements are as follows :

San Xavier, San Joseph,

La Concepcion, Santiago,

San Miguel, San Juan,

San Ignacio, El Santo,

Santa Ana, Corazon.

San Rafael,

CHIQUIZA, a settlement of the corregimientoof Sachica in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces wheat,maize, barley, papaSy and the other fruits peculiarto its climate. Its ijihabitants are so few as scarcelyto amount to 30 housekeepers, and about the samenumber of Indians. Four leagues to the n. w. ofTunja, and somewhat less from Velez.

CHIRA, a settlement and seat of the silver minesof the province and corregimiento of Piura in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Paita.

Same name, another settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Nicoya in the kingdomof Guate-mala.

[CHIRAGOW. See Plein River.]

CHIRAMBIRA, an island situate in the largebay of St. Juan, on the coast of the province andgovernment of Choco in the S. sea, which gives itsname to a small creek formed by this island and thecontinent.

CHIRCA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Sicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chulumani.

CHIRE, Santa Rosa de a city of the govern-ment and province of Los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; founded by the GovernorFrancisco Anciso. It is of a very hot and un-healthy temperature, but affords the same vegetableproductions as the rest of the province. It is somean and reduced as to contain hardly 100 house-keepers, and scarcely deserves the name of a city.This settlement lies the furthest to the n. w. extre-mity of any in this kingdom, and is bounded inthat quarter by the province and bishopric of Ca-racas.

Same name a river of the aboveprovince and government. It rises at the foot ofthe lomas del Viento, runs e. and enters the Meta,traversing the country of the Betoyes Indians.

CHIRGUA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain of Ta-cazuruma on the s. runs s. and enters the Gamalo-tal, after having collected the waters of many otherrivers.

CHIRIBIQUI, Santa Fe de a settlement ofthe province and government of Cumana in thekingdom of Tierra Firme ; situate on the coast,between the rivers Mosina and Marecapana.

CHIRICOAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada, to the e. of themountains of Bogota, and at the entrance of thellanos or plains of Cazanare and Meta. Theylead a wandering life through the woods in com-pany with the Guaibas ; they are crafty and verydexterous thieves, but of a docile and pacific dis-position. In 16.64; some of them were reduced into

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CRAVO, Santa Barbara de, a settlement ofthe jurisdiction of Santiago de las Atalayas, of thegovernment of Los Llanos of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It is on the shore of the large river of itsname, upon a very pleasant mountain plain, verynear to i\\ellanura at the bottom of the mountain, andwhere formerly stood the city of San Joseph deCravo, founded by the governor of this province in1644, but which was soon after destroyed. Thctem-perature here is not so hot as in the other parts ofthe province, from its being', as we have beforeobserved, in the vicinity of t\\e paramos or moun-taiti deserts. It produces in abundance maize,plantains, and pucas, of which is made the bestcazave of any in the kingdom, also many trees ofa hard and strong wood, used as a medicine inspotted fevers, and a specific against poisons, sothat it is much esteemed, and they make of itdrinking cups. Here are other trees, good forcuring the flux, their virtue in this disorder havingbeen accidentally discovered as follows. A la-bourer, as he was cutting down one of these trees,let his hatchet fall upon his foot; but rememberingthat by pressing his foot against the tree it wouldstop the blood, he did so, and a splinter thus gettinginto the wound, the cut soon healed without theapplication of any other remedy. Here are largebreeds of horned cattle, and the natives, whoshould amount to 100 Indians, and about as manywhites, are much given to agriculture. Eightleagues from the settlement of Morcote.

Cravo, a river of the former province and go-vernment. It rises in the province of Tunja, nearthe lake of Labranza, passes before the city, towhich it gives its name, and after running manyleagues, enters the Meta.

CRAVO, another river, in the district and juris-diction of Pamplona, of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It rises to the e. of the settlement ofCapitanejo, runs s. s. e. and enters the river Caza-nare, according to Beilin, in his map of the courseof a part of the Orinoco; and indeed ^\e doubt ifhe be not correct. In the woods upon its shoreslive some barbarian Indians, the }ietoyes,.Acira-guas, and Guaibas. its mouth is in tat. 3° SO' n.

(CREE Indians, The, inhabit of Littlelake Winnipeg, around fort Daiipiiin, in UpperCanada.)

(CREEKS, an Indian nation, described alsounder tfie name of Muskogulge or Muskogee,in addition to 'which is the following particulars,from the manuscript joarnal of an infeliigent tra-veller : “ Coosa river, and its main branches, formthe re. line of settlements or villages of the Creeks,but their hunting grounds cxtaid 200 miles be-

yond, to the Tombigbee, which is the dividingline between their coufitry and that of the Chac-taws. The smallest of their towns have from 20to 30 ho'.ises in them, and some of them containfrom 130 to 200, that are wholly compact. Thehouses stand in clusters of four, five, six, seven,and eight together, irregularly distributed up anddown the banks of the rivers or small streams.Each cluster of houses contains a clan or family orelations, who eat and live in common. Eac!town has a public square, hot-house, and yard ne.the centre of it, appropriatad to various pubhuses. The following are the names of the prin-cipal towns of the Upper and Lower Creeks thathave public squares ; beginning at the head of theCoosa or Coosa Hatcha river, viz. Upper Utalas,Abbacoochees, Natchez, Coosas, Oteetoocheenas,Pine Catchas, Pocuntullahases, Weeokes, LittleTallassie, Tuskeegees, Coosadas, Alabamas, Ta-wasas, Pawactas, Autobas, Auhoba, W eelump-kees Big,W eelumpkees Little, Wacacoys, Wack-soy, Ochees. The following towns are in thecentral, inland, and high country, between theCoosa and Taliapoosee rivers, in the district calledthe Hillabees, viz. Hillabees, Killeegko, Oakchoys,Slakagulgas, and Wacacoys; on the waters ofthe Taliapoosee, from the head of the river down-ward, the following, viz. Tuckabatchee, Tehassa,Totacaga, New Aork, Chalaacpaulley, Logus-pogus, Oakfuskee, Ufala Little, Ufala Big, Soga-hatches,Tuckabatchees, Big Tallassce or Half-wayHouse, Clewaleys, Coosahatches, Coolamies, Sha-Vt'anese or Savanas, Kenlsulka, and Mnckeleses.The towns of the Low'er Creeks, beginning on thehead waters of the Chattahoosee, and so on down-wards, are Chelu Ninny, Chattahoosee, liohtatoga,Cowetas, Cussitahs, Chalagatscaor, Broken Arrow,Euchces several, Hitchatces several, Palachuolo,Chewackala ; besides 20 towns and villages ofthe Little and Big Chehaus, low down on Flint andChattahoosee rivers. From their roving and un-steady manner of living, it is impossible to deter-mine, 'with much precision, the number of Indiansthat comimse tlie Creek nation. General M‘GiI-livray estimates the number of gun-men to be be-tween 3 and 6000, exclusive of the Semiuolcs, Avhoare of little or no accosmt in war, except as smallparties of marauders, acting independent of thegeneral interest of the others. The wliole numberof individuals may be about 23 or 26,000 souls.Every town and village has one established whitetrader in it, and generally a family of whites, wholiave fled from some part of the tfontiers. Theyoften, to have revenge, and to obtain jdunder thatmay be taken, use their influence to scud out pre«3 Y 2

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inin, and containing 72 families of Indians, dedi-cated to the commerce of saltpetre and cochineal.Three leagues to the s. of its head settlement.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the alcaldia mayorof the same kingdom. It contains 36 families ofIndians, and is in the boundaries of the jurisdictionof Xalapa.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the island of Cuba;situate bj a creek or bay formed by the sea, on thes. coast, between the settlement of Guanco and thebay of iflatanzas.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementof Zultepec, and alcaldia mayor of the same name,in Nueva Espana. It contains 36 families of In-dians, and is six leagues to the s. of the capital.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Toluca in the same king-dom. It contains 51 families of Indians, and is ata small distance to the n. of its capital.

Cruz, Santa, another, a head settlement of thedistrict of the province and alceddia mayor ofTlaxcala in the same kingdom.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementof Chapala, and alcaldia mayor of Zayula, in thesame kingdom ; situate on the shore of the greatlake or sea of Chapala. It contains 28 families ofIndians, who cultivate many seeds and fruits fromthe fertility and pleasantness of the country; oc-cupying tliemselves also in traffic and in fishingupon the lakes. It is tsvo leagues to the e. of itshead settlement.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of Mainas ofthe kingdom of Quito ; situate on the shore of theriver Napo.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementand edra’dia mayor of Caxititlan in Nueva Es-pana. Four leagues to the s. of its cajjital.

Cruz, Santa, another, of tlie head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Tlajomulco in the samekingdom, in which there is a convcul of the reli-gious order of St. Francis.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the head settlementof Cacula, cmA alcaldia mayoral Zayula, in thesame kingdom. It contains 50 families of Indians,who employ themselves in agriculture, and in cut-ting wood upon the mountains of its district. Fourleagues between the w. and s. of its head settlement.

Cruz, Santa, another, of tlic missions whichW,ere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits in the province of Tepeguana, and kingdomof Nueva Vizcaya ; situate on the shore of theriver of Las Nasas.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the nrissions of the

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religious order of St. Francis, in the province ofTaraumara, of the same kingdom as the former.Eighteen leagues to the s, e. of the real of the minesand town of San Felipe de Chiguagua.

Cruz, Santa, another, called Real de la Cruz,in the province and government of Cartagena, onthe shore of the large river Magdalena, and uponan island formed by this river and the w aters of theDique.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Antioquía in the Nuevo Reyno dcGranada, on the shore of the river Cauca.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru, of the district andjurisdiction of the city of Cordoba.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the missions whichare held by the religious order of St. Francis, inthe kingdom of Nuevo Mexico.

Cruz, Santa, another, with the addition ofMayo, in the province and government of Cinaloa ;situate at the mouth of the river Mayo, whichgives it its name. It has a port convenient for trade.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the same kingdom ofNuevo Mexico ; situate on the shore of a riverwhich enters the large river Del Norte.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andgovernment of the river Hacha ; situate on thecoast, to the e. of tlie capital.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Antioquía in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; founded on the shore of the river Sinu,with a good port, which serves as an entrepot forgoods to be carried to Choco, from whence it liesa three-days journey.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana ; situate atthe mouth of the river Mayo, where this entersthe California, or Mar Roxo de Cortes. Distinctfrom another, which is upon a shore of the sameriver.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province and go-vernment of La Sonora in the same kingdom ;situate in the country of the Apaches Indians, onthe shore of a river which enters the Gila.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andalcaldia mayor of Zacapula in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andalcaldia mayor of Verapaz in the same kingdom.

(Cruz, a parish of tlie province and govern-ment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a small riverrunning into the Plata, about five leagues n. of thetown of imxan, in lat. 31° 16' 22". Long. 59*23' SO" a'.)

(Cruz, La, a settlement of Indians of the pro-3 z

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
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C R U

C R U

vince and government of Buenos Ayres, foundedin ]629, in lat. 29° 29' 1" 5.]t])Cruz, Santa, an island oftheN. sea,^one of theAntilles, 22 leagues long and five wide. Its terri-tory is fertile, but the air unhealthy at certain sea-sons, from the low situation. It has many rivers,streams, and fountains, with three very good andconvenient ports. It was for a long while desert,until some English settled themselves in it, andbegan to cultivate it; afterwards the French pos-sessed themselves of it, in 1650, and sold it thefollowing year to the knights of Malta, from whomit was bought, in 1664, by the West India com-pany. In 1674, it was incorporated with the pos-sessions of the crown by the king of France. Itsinhabitants afterwards removed to the island of St.Domingo, demolished the forts, and sold it to acompany of Danes, of Copenhagen, who nowpossess it. It was the first of the Antilles whichwas occupied by the Spaniards ; is SO leagues

from the island of St. Christopher’s, eight fromPuertorico, six from that of Boriquen, and fivefrom that of St. Thomas. It abounds in sugarscane and tobacco, as also in fruits, which renderit very delightful. [It is said to produce SO, 000or 40,000 hhds. of sugar annually, and other W.India commodities, in tolerable plenty. It is ina high state of cultivation, and has about 3000white inhabitants and 30,000 slaves. A greatproportion of the Negroes of this island have em-braced Christianity, under the Moravian mission-aries, whose influence has been greatly promotiveof its prosperity.

The official value of the Imports and Exportsof Santa Cruz were, in

1809, imports ^^435,378, exports ^ig84,964.

1810, 422,033, 89,949.

And the quantities of the principal articles im--

ported into Great Britain were, in

Coffee.

Sugar.

Rum.

Cotton Wool.

Brit. Plant.

For. Plant.

Brit. Plant.

For. Plant.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Cwt.

Galls.

Lbs.

1809, 297

1479

280,211

374

181,594

610,903

1810, 31

290,933

236,307

174,294

Santa Cruz is in lat. 70° 44' n. Long. 64° 43' w.See West Indies.]

Cruz, Santa, a small island in the straits©f Magellan, opposite cape Monday. The Ad-miral Pedro Sarmiento took possession of it for thecrown of Spain, that making the tenth time of itsbeing captured.

Cruz, Santa, a small island of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Rey,between that coast and the island of Santa Catalina.

Cruz, Santa, a sand -bank or islet near the n.coast of the island of Cuba, and close to the sand-bank of Cumplido.

Cruz, Santa, a point of the coast of the provinceand government of Honduras, called Triunfo dela Cruz, (Triumph of the Cross), between theport of La Sal and the river Tian, SO leagues fromthe gulf, in lat. 15° 40'.

Cruz, Santa, a port of the coast which lies be-tween the river La Plata and the straits of Magellan.On one side it has the Ensenada Grande, or LargeBay, and on the other the mountain of Santa Ines.Lat. 50° 10' s.

==Cruz, Santa, a river of the coastwhich lies be-tween the river La Plata and the straits of Magel-lan. It runs into the sea.

Q

Cruz, Santa, a small river of the provinceand captainship of Los Ilheos in Brazil. Itrises near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea be-tween the Grande and the Dulce, opposite theshoals ofS. Antonio.

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andcaptainship of Seara in the same kingdom. It risesnear the coast, runs n. and enters the sea betweenthe point of Palmeras and that of Tortuga,

Cruz, Santa, another, of the province andgovernment of Maracaybo. It rises in the sierraof Perija, runs e. and enters the great lake on thew. side.

Cruz, Santa, a lake of the province and countryof the Chiquitos Indians in Peru, formed from adrain issuing from the side of the river Para-guay, opposite the cordillera of San Fernando.

Cruz, Santa, a small island of the gulf of California, or Mar Roxo de Cortes; situate near thecoast, between the two islands of Catalana and SanJoseph.

Cruz, Santa, a small port of the island of Curacao, in the w. part, opposite the island of Oruba.

Cruz, Santa, a mountain on the coast of theMalvine or Falkland isles.

Cruz, Santa, a cape or point of the coast of thx

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