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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Tlacolula, from whence it is distant a league ant a half to the N.

another, settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Xicayan, of the same kingdom. It contains 12 Indian families, and is 10 leagues distant from its head settlement.

ACATEPEQUE, S. Franciso de, a settlement of the head settlement of St. Andres de Cholula, and alcaldía mayor of this name. It contains 140 Indian families, and is half a league to the S of its capital.

another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Igualapa, situate at a league's distance to the E of the same.

ACATIC, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Tecpatitlan, in the kingdom and bishopric of Nueva Galicia. It is four leagues to the S of its capital.

ACATICO, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Cuquio, in Nueva España.

ACATLAN, a settlement and capital of the alcaldía mayor of this name. It is of a mild temperature, and its situation is at the entrance of the Misteca Baxa. It contains 850 families of Indians, and 20 of Spaniards and Mustees. In its vicinity are some excellent saltgrounds, in which its commerce chiefly consists. The jurisdiction of this alcaldía, which contains four other head settlements of the district, is fertile and pleasant, abounding in flowers, fruits, all kinds of pulse and seeds, and is well watered. They have here large breeds of goats, which they slaughter chiefly for the skin and the fat, salting down the flesh, and sending it to La Puebla and other parts to be sold. In its district are many cultivated lands. It is 55 leagues leagues to the E S E of Mexico. Long. 275° 10' W Lat. 19° 4' N.

another settlement of the same name, with the dedicatory title of S. Andres, in the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Xalapa, in the same kingdom, situate on a clayey spot of ground, of a cold moist temperature, rendered fertile by an abundance of streams, which in a very regular manner water the lands; although,it being void of mountains and exposed to the N winds, the fruits within its neighourhood do not come to maturity. It contains 180 Indian families, including those of the new settlement, which was established at a league's distance to the S of its head settlement, and which is called San Miguel de las Aguastelas. Acatlan is a league and a half distant from its head settlement.

another settlement, having the dedicatory title of San Pedro, belonging to the head settlement of Malacatepec and alcaldía mayor of Nexapa, in the same kingdom. It contains 80 Indian families, who trade in wool and in the fish called bobo, quantities of which are found in a large river which runs close by the settlement, and which are a great source of emolument to them. It is four leagues N of its capital.

another settlement of he bead settlement of Zitlala, of the same alcaldía and kingdom. It contains 198 Indian families, and its situation is a league and an half N of its head settlement.

another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldía mayor of Sentipac, of the same kingdom. It is of a cold temperature, contains 42 Indian families, and is 15 leagues N E of its capital.

another settlement of the head settlement of Atotonilco, and alcaldía mayor of Tulanzingo in the same kingdom. It contains 115 Indian families, and a convent of the religious order of St. Augustin. — Two leagues N of its head settlement.

ACATLAZINGO, Santa Maria de, a settlement of the head settlement of Xicula, and alcaldía mayor of Nexapa, situate in a plain that is surrounded on all sides by mountains. It contains 67 Indian families, who employ themselves in the culture of the cochineal plant.

ACATULA, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela, situate on the shore of the river Guasqui, to the E of the city of Coro.

ACAXEE, a nation of Indians of the province of Topia. It is well peopled, and was converted to the Catholic faith by the father Hernando de Santaren, and others of the abolished society of the Jesuits, in 1602. They are docile, of good dispositions and abilities. In the time of their idolatry, they used to bend the heads of their dead with their bodies and knees together, and in this posture inter them in a cave, or under a rock, giving them provisions for the journey which they fancied them about to make ; also laying by them a bow and arrows for their defence. Should an Indian woman happen to have died in childbed, the infant was put to death ; for they used to say, it was the cause of her death. These Indians were once induced by a sorcerer to make an insurrection, but it was quelled by the governor of the province, Don Francisco de Ordinola, in the year 1612.

ACAXETE, Santa María de, the head, settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate on the slope of the noted sierra of Tlascala. It is of a cold and dry temperature, contains seven Spanish families, 10 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 176 of Mexican Indians. In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

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In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

ACAXUCHITLAN the head settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Tulazingo, to the N E. It contains 406 Indian families, and is a curacy of the bishopric of La Puebla de los Angeles. Distant four leagues to the E of its capital.

ACAYUCA, the alcaldía mayor of Nueva España, and of the province of Goazacoalco. Its jurisdiction is very extended, and consists, for the most part, of places of a hot and moist temperature, but so fertile is it that it gives annually four crops of maize; and as there is no demand for this production in the other provinces, it follows, of course, that the Indians here are little given to industry. Indeed the ground never requires the plough, and the whole of their labours during the seedtime consist merely in smoothing the surface of the mountains, and in scratching up the ground with a pointed stick. It is at times infested by locusts, which destroy the plants and crops ; and having never been able to find a remedy against this evil, the inhabitants had recourse to the protection of the virgin of La Conception, which is revered in the head settlement of the district of the Chichimecas ; and it is said that, owing to her mediatory influence, the plague has been thought to diminish. This province is watered by the abundant river of the Goazacoalco. The settlements of this alcaldía are, Xocoteapa, Macayapa, Menzapa, Molocan, Theimanquillo, Tinantitlan, Chinameca, Zoconusco, Olutla, Otcapa, Pochutla, Ostitan, Cozolcaque, Ixhuatla, Macatepeque.

another, the capital of the above, situate on the coast of the N. sea. Its inhabitants are composed of 30 families of Spaniards, 296 of Indians, and 70 of Mustees and Mulattoes. It lies a little more than 100 leagues S E of Mexico. Lat. 17° 53' N Long. 94° 46' 30" W.

another, settlement in the alcaldía mayor of Pachuca, in the kingdom of Nueva España, annexed to the curacy of Tezayuca, and containing 100 Indian families.

Acacingo, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate in a plain of a mild temperature, and watered by two streams which run close to all the houses of the settlement, to the great comfort of the inhabitants. In the middle of the above plain there is a beautiful fountain, a convent of the religious order of St. Francis, a very ancient building, and some other buildings, which have been erected since the conquest of the country. The parish church is a piece of the most ancient architecture. The inhabitants are composed of 150 families of Spaniards, 104 of Mustees, 31 of Mulattoes, and 700 of Indians; 3 1/4 leagues E to the NE of its capital.

ACAZUTLA, a port of the S sea, on the coast of the province of the alcaldía mayor of Zuchitepec, in the kingdom of Guatemala, between the point of Los Remedios, and the settlement of Guapaca. [Lat. 14° 42' N Long. 90° 3'.]

ACCHA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru, situate on the skirt of a mountain, which has a prominence, seeming as though it were about to fall upon the settlement. This mountain is constantly dwindling away without any assignable cause. Lat. 13° 19 s. Long. 71° 13' W

ACCHA-AMANSAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru.

ACCHA-URINZABA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masque in Peru.

Aceites, a river of the province and government of Caraccas, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the mountains, and enters the Orituco.

[ACCOCESAWS. The ancient town and principal place of residence of these Indians is on the W side of Colorado of Rio Rouge, about 200 miles S W of Nacogdoches, but they often change their place of residence for a season : being near the bay, they make great use of fish, oysters &c.; kill a great many deer, which are the largest and fattest in the province ; and their country is universally said to be inferior to no part of the province in soil, growth of timber, goodness of water, and beauty of surface; they have a language peculiar to themselves, but have a mode of communication by dumb signs, which they all understand: number about 80 men. Thirty or forty years ago, the Spaniards had a mission here, but broke it up, or moved it to Nacogdoches. They talk of resettling it, and speak in the highest terms,of the country.]

[ACCOMACK County, in Virginia, is situated on a peninsula, bounded N by Maryland, E by the ocean, and on the W by Chesapeak bay, and contains 13.959 inhabitants, including 4.262 slaves.]

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[only informed of it by the natives of Hispaniola,but having landed himself at Guadalupe on itsfirst discovery, he beheld in several cottagesthe head and limbs of the human body recentlyseparated, and evidently kept for occasional re-pasts. He released at the same time several ofthe natives of Porto Rico, who, having beenbrought captives from thence, were reserved asvictims for the same horrid purpose. But amongthemselves they were peaceable, and towards eachother faithful, friendly, and affectionate. Theyconsidered all strangers indeed as enemies, and ofthe people of Europe they formed a right estima-tion. The antipathy which they manifested to-wards the unoffending natives of the larger islandsappears extraordinary, but it is said to have de-scended to them from their ancestors of Guiana :they considered those islanders as a colony of Ar-rowauks, a nation of South America, with whomthe Caribes of that continent are continually at war.We can assign no cause for such hereditary andirreconcilable hostility. With regard to the peo-ple of Europe, it is allowed, that whenever anyof them had acquired their confidence, it wasgiven without reserve. Their friendship was aswarm as their enmity was implacable. The Ca-ribes of Guiana still fondly cherish the tradition ofRaleigh’s alliance, and to this day preserve theEnglish colours which he left with them at part-ing. (Bancroft, p. 259.) They painted their facesand bodies with arnotto so extravagantly, thattheir natural complexion, which was nearly thatof a Spanish olive, was not easily to be distinguish-ed under the surface of crimson. However, as thismode of painting themselves was practised by bothsexes, perhaps it was at first introduced as a de-fence against the venomous insects so common intropical climates, or possibly they considered thebrilliancy of the colour as highly ornamental. Themen disfigured their cheeks with deep incisionsand hideous scars, which they stained with black,and they painted white and black circles roundtheir eyes ; some of them perforated the cartilagethat divides the nostrils, and inserted the bone ofsome fish, a parrot’s feather, or a fragment of tor-toise-shell ; a frightful custom, practised also bythe natives of New Holland ; and they strung to-gether the teeth of such of their enemies as theyhad slain in battle, and wore them on their legsand arms as trophies of successful cruelty. Todraw the bow with unerring skill, to wield theclub with dexterity and strength, to swim withagility and boldness, to catch fish, and to build acottage, were acquirements of indispensable neces-sity, and the education of their children was well

suited to the attainment of them. One method ofmaking their boys skilful, even in infancy, in theexercise of the bow, was to suspend their food onthe branch of a tree, compelling the hardy urchinsto pierce it with their arrows before they could ob-tain permission to eat. Their arrows were com-monly poisoned, except when they made their mi-litary excursions by night : on those occasionsthey converted them into instruments of still greatermischief ; for, by ai ming the points with pledgetsof cotton dipt into oil, and set on flame, they firedwhole villages of their enemies at a distance. Thepoison which they used was a concoction of nox-ious gums and vegetable juices, and had the pro-perty of being perfectly innocent when received-inlo the stomach; but if communicated immediate-ly to the blood through the slightest wound, it wasgenerally mortal. As soon as a male child wasbrought into the world, he was sprinkled with:some drops of his father’s blood. The ceremoniesused on this occasion were sufficiently painful tothe father, but he submitted without emotion orcomplaint, fondly believing that the same degreeof courage which he had himself displayed wasby these means transmitted to his son. As theboy grew, he was soon made familiar with scenesof barbarity ; he partook of the horrid repasts ofhis nation, and he was frequently anointed withthe fat of a slaughtered Arrowauk : but he was notallowed to participate in the toils of the warrior,and to share the glories of conquest, until his for-titude had been brought to the test. The dawn ofmanhood ushered in the hour of severe trial. Hewas now to exchange the name he had receivedin his infancy for one more sounding and signifi-cant; a ceremony of high importance in the life of aCaribe, but always accompanied by a scene of fero-cious festivity and unnatural cruelty. In times ofpeace, the Caribes admitted of no supremacy but thatof nature. Having no laws, they needed no ma-gistrates. To their old men, indeed, they allowedsome kind of authority, but it was at best ill-de-fined, and must at all times have been insufficientto protect the weak against the strong. In war,experience had taught them that subordinationwas as requisite as courage ; they thereiore electedtheir captains in their general assemblies withgreat solemnity, but they put their pretensions tothe proof with circumstances of outrageous barba-rity. When success attended the measures of acandidate for command, the feast and the triumphawaited his return. He exchanged his name a se-cond time ; assuming in future that of the mostformidable Arrowauk that had fallen by his hand.He was permitted to appropriate to himself as many]

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cattle of all sorts; aiul there arc some gold mines,though they produce at present very sp:n ingly;some of the silver mines, Avhlch were very fruitful,have lately filled with water, and attempts havebeen made in vain to empty them. Indeed theonly mines which have produced any great wealthare those found in the mountains of Aullagas, andfrom them, for some years past, metals of therarest qualities have been extracted. In the woodsof the valleys, which produce very fine and excel-lent timber, are found wolves, tigers, and otherwild beasts inhabiting the mountains ; also aspecies of bees, which form their combs in the hol-lows of trees, and the honey of which they callde charas. There is a river in this province com-posed of several streams, and which unites itselfwith the Cochabamba. The number of its inha-bitants amounts to 36,000, who are divided into27 settlements. Its reparlimienfo used to amountto 92,665 dollars, and its n/cflxvife to 7-11 dollarsper annum. It is one of the richest provinces ofPeru.

The capital is of the same name, and the othersettlements are,

Chayantacas,

Amayapampa,

Laimes,

Calacala,

Amaya,

Amayavilque,

Pocoata,

Chayala,

Casimbiico,

San Pedro

Moromoro,

Maragua,

PancacUij

Sarari,

de Macha,

Charca,

Pitantora,

Ocuri,

Uruyearasi,

San Francisco dc Micani,San Marcos de Mirailo-res,

Surumi,

Santiago de l\Ioscari,

San Pedro de Buenavista,Acasio,

Toracari,

Iluaicoma,

Aullagas.

CHEANE, a river of the province and govern-ment of Paraguay.

CHEARA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Huaiama.

(CHEAT River rises in Randolph county,Virginia, and after pursuing a n. n. w. course, joinsMonongahela river, three or four miles within thePennsylvania line. It is 200 yards wide at itsmoutli, and 100 yards at the Dunkards settlement,50 miles higher, and is navigable for boats, exceptin dry seasons. There is a portage of 37 milesfrom this river to the Potowmack, at the mouth ofSavage river.)

CHEBA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-

nada, of a cold temperature. It lies between somemountains, and abounds in the produclioris of a,cold climate, such as wheat, maize, trullles, andbarley ; it consists of 100 house-keepers, and of40 Indians, all of Avliom are subject to the disorderof the cotos, or swelling of the throat; is 21leagues to the n. e. of Tunja.

CHEBANONKOGUE, a town of the French,in Canada ; situate in the country of the MistasuisIndians, on the n. shore of a lake which gives it itsname.

CHEBEN, a river of Nova Scotia. It risesfrom a small lake near the settlement and fort ofSackville, runs n. and enters the Basin des Mines,or of the Mines, of the bay of Fundy.

(CHEBUCTO, a bay and harbour on the s. s. e.coast of Nova Scotia, distinguished by the loss ofa French fleet in a former war between Franceand Great Britain. Near the head of this bay,on the w. side, stands the city of Halifax, the ca-pital of the province.)

CHECA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Tinta in Peru.

CHECACUPI, a settlement of the same pro-vince and kingdom as the former.

CHECACUPI, another, in the province of Quispi-canchi or Urcos in the same kingdom.

CHECASA, La Nueva, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Pilaya and Paspayain Peru.

CHECHIRGANTI, a river of the provinceand government of Darien in the kingdom ofTierra Firme. It rises in the mountains on the n.side, runs n. and enters the sea in the small beechor playon, opposite the port of Calidonia.

CHECODIN, a small lake of the province andcountry of the Iroquees Indians in Canada, liesbetween the lake Oswego and the river Ohio.

CHECHAS. See Chancay.

(CHEDABUCTO, or Milford Haven, alarge and deep bay on the easternmost part ofNova Scotia, at the mouth of the gut of Canso.Opposite to its mouth stands isle Madame. Sal-mon river falls into this bay from the w. and isremarkable for one of the greatest fisheries in theworld.)

CHEDIAC, a small river of Nova Scotia,which runs e. and enters the sea in the strait formedby the coast and the island of San Juan.

(CHEESADAWD Lake, about 210 miles n. e.by e. of the Canadian house, on the c. end ofSlave lake, in the Hudson bay company’s terri-tory, is about 35 miles in length, and the same inbreadth. Its w. shore is mountainous and rocky.)

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belongs to the bishopric of La Paz, and is so situateas to have a fine view of the lake. It is a settle-ment at once the most pleasant and convenient,fertile, and abounding in fruits and cattle, butits temperature is excessively cold. It has twoparishes, with the dedicatory title of Santo Do-mingo and La Asuncion, and two hermitages de-dicated to St. Barbara and St. Sebastian. Theother settlements are,

Asiento de Minas de Mi- Asiento del Desagua-

chacani, dero,

Asiento de San Ante- Acora,

nio de Esquilache, Hi lave,

Pomata, *July,

Asiento de Huacullani, Santiago,

Zepita.

Same name, The lake of, which, although it bethus called, is also known by the name of Titicaca,is 51 leagues in length from n. w. to s. e. and 26in width, although in some parts less. On its shoresare six provinces or corregimientos^ which are.The province of this Paucarcolla,name, Lampa,Pacages, Asangaro.Omasuyos,This lake is of sufficient depth for vessels ofany size, since in many bays not far in from itsshores there are from four to six fathoms of water,and within it, some places from 40 to 50. It is, asfar as is ascertained, without any shoals or banks.Near it grow some herbs, called clacchos, eaten bythe cows and pigs ; also a great quantity of theherb called totora, or cat’s tail, which in someparts grows to the length of a yard and an half.Of this the Indians make rafts, not only for fishingbut for carrying to and fro the cattleand productionsof the harvest and crops growing in the variousislands lying in this lake. Some of these islandsare so covered and hemmed in with the herb totorathat it requires much force and labour to cut a pas-sage through it. In one of the largest of theseislands the Incas had a magnificent temple, dedi-cated to the sun, the first that was ever built. Thislake is not without its tempests and squalls ; theyare, on the contrary, frequent, and have at timescaused no inconsiderable mischief. Its watersare thick, but are nevertheless drank by the cattle,and even the Indians ; particularly by those ofthe nation of the Uros, who are a poor ignorantpeople, who formerly lived upon the islands ingreat wretchedness, and who by dint of great solici-tations have been prevailed upon to leave them forthe mainland^ where they now reside in some mi-serable caves, excavated places, or holes in theearth covered over with fiags of totora^ maintain-

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ing themselves by fishing. This lake containslikewise various kinds of fish, such as trout,ormantos, cuches, anchovies, and boquillas inabundance; these are, for the most part, aboutthe length of a man’s hand, and three fingersthick. The Indians of Yunguyo take upwardsof 700 yearly, and sell them at four and six dollarsthe thousand. They also catch some small peje-reyesy and an infinite variety of birds, which aresalted, and afford excellent food. It is confidentlyand repeatedly asserted by the Indians, that thegreater part of the riches of the country was throwninto this lake when the Spaniards entered it at thetime of the conquest ; and amongst other valuablesthe great gold chain made by the order of theInca Huayanacap, which was 2S3 yards in length,and within which 6000 men could dance.

CHUCURPU, an ancient settlement of warlikeIndians of the province and corregimiento ofCuzco in Peru. It lies to the e. of this city, andwas subjected and united to the empire after along resistance by Pachacutec, emperor of theIncas.

CHUCUTI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Darien in the government of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains towards the e.and following this course, enters the Taranena at asmall distance from its source.

CHUDAUINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the kingdom of Quito, to the s, e. ofthis city. They inhabit the part lying s. w. ofthe river Pastaza, and are bounded on the s. e, bythe Ipapuisas, and w. by the Xibaros. They arenot numerous, owing to the continual wars whichthey have maintained with their neighbours ; andthough of a martial spirt, they are of a docile andhumane disposition. Some of them have 'Unitedthemselves with the Andoas, in the settlement ofthis name, which lies upon the w. shore of theriver Pastaza.

CHUECA, San Agustin de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Lipes, and archbi-shopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of San Christoval.

CHUETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Choco. It rises in the sierras of Abide,runs w. and enters the Paganagandi.

CHUFIAS, a barbarous nation of Indians whoinhabit the e. of the river Aguaricu, bounded onthe n. w. by the nation of the Encabellados, withwhom they are in continual warfare.

CHUGOD, Santa Catalina de, a settlementof the province and corregimiento of Caxamarcain Peru, annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CHUI, a river of the province and captainship3 o

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(is generally 5. s.zc. as likewise through Massachus-setts, and part of Connecticut, until it reaches thecity of Middleton ; after wliich it runs a s, s. e.course to its mouth. The navigation of this beau-tiful river, which, like the Nile, fertilizes tiie landsthrough which it runs, is much obstructed byfalls ; two of these are between New Hampshireand Vermont, the first are called the Fifteen-milefalls ; here the river is rapid for 20 miles : thesecond remarkable fall is at Walpole, formerlycalled the Great falls, but now called Bellows’falls. Above these the breadth of the river is insome places 22, in other places not above 16 rods;the depth of the channel is about 25 feet, and com-monly runs full of water. In September 1792,however, owing to the severe drought, the waterof the river, it is said, “ passed within (he spaceof 12 feet wide, and 2| feet deep.” A large rockdivides the stream into two channels, each about90 feet wide ; when the river is low, the e. channelis dry, being crossed by a solid rock ; and thewhole stream falls into the w. channel, where it iscontracted to the breadth of 16 feet, and flows withastonishing rapidity. There are several pitches,one above another, in the length of half a mile, thelargest of which is that where the rock divides thestream. A bridge of timber was projected over this fallby Colonel Hale, in the year 1784, 365 feet long,and supported in the middle by the island rock,and under it the highest floods pass without doingany injury; this is the only bridge on the river,but it is contemplated to erect another, SO milesabove, at the middle bar of Agar falls, where thepassage for the water, between the rocks, is 100feet wide ; this will connect the towns of Lebanonin New Hampshire, and Hartford in Vermont ; asthe former bridge connects Walpole in NewHampshire with Rockingham in Vermont. Not-withstanding the velocity of the current at Bellows’falls, above described, the salmon pass up theriver, and are taken many miles above, but the shadproceed no farther. On the steep sides of theisland rock, at the fall, hang several arm chairs,secured by a counterpoise ; in these the fishermensit to catch salmon with fishing nets. In the courseof the river, through Massachusetts, are the fallsat South Hadley, around which locks and canalswere completed in 1795, by an enterprising com-pany, incorporated for that purpose in 1792, bythe legislature of Massachusetts. In Connecticutthe river is obstructed by falls at Enfield, to ren-der which navigable in boats, a company has beenincorporated, and a sum of money raised by lot-tery, but nothing effectual is yet done. The

average descent of this river from Weathersfield inVermont, 150 miles from its mouth, is two feet toa mile, according to the barometrical observationsof J. Winthrop, Esq. made in 1786. The riversor streams which fall into Connecticut river arenumerous; such of them as are worthy of noticewill be seen under their respective names. At itsmouth is a bar of sand, which considerably ob-structs the navigation ; it has 10 feet water on itat full tides, and the depth is the same to Middle-ton, from which the bar is 36 miles distant. AboveMiddleton there are some shoals which have onlysix feet water at high tide, and here the tide ebbsand flows about eight inches ; three miles abovethat city the river is contracted to about 40 rodsin breadth, by two high mountains ; on almostevery other part of the river the banks are low,and spread into fine extensive meadows. In thespring floods, which generally happen in May,these meadows are covered with water. At Hart-ford, the water sometimes rises 20 feet above thecommon surface of the river, and the water hav-ing no other outlet but the above mentioned strait,it is sometimes tw o or three weeks before it returnsto its usual bed ; these floods add nothing to-thedepth of water on the bar at the mouth of theriver, as the bar lies too far off in the sound to beaffected by them. This river is navigable toHartford city upwards of 50 miles from its mouth,and the produce of the country for 200 miles aboveit, is brought thither in boats. The boats whichare used in this business are flat-bottomed, long,and narrow, and of so light a make as to be port-able in carts : before the construction of locks andcanals on (his river, they were taken out at threedifferent carrying places, all of which made 15miles : it is expected that in a few years the ob-structions will be all removed. Sturgeon, salmon,and shad, are caught in plenty in their season, fromthe mouth of the river upwards, excepting stur-geon, which do not ascend the upper falls; be-sides a variety of small fish, such as pike, carp,perch, &c. There is yet a strong expectation ofopening a communication between this river andthe Merrimack, through Sugar river, which runsinto the Connecticut at Claremont in New Mamp-shire, and the Contoocook, which falls into tlieMerrimack at Boscawen. From this river wereemployed, in 1789, three brigs of 180 tons each,in the European trade ; and about 60 sail, from60 to 150 tons, in the VV. India trade, besidesa few fishermen, and 40 or 50 coasting vessels.The number has considerably increased since.)

(Connecticut, a stream in Long island, New

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CRAVO, Santa Barbara de, a settlement ofthe jurisdiction of Santiago de las Atalayas, of thegovernment of Los Llanos of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It is on the shore of the large river of itsname, upon a very pleasant mountain plain, verynear to i\\ellanura at the bottom of the mountain, andwhere formerly stood the city of San Joseph deCravo, founded by the governor of this province in1644, but which was soon after destroyed. Thctem-perature here is not so hot as in the other parts ofthe province, from its being', as we have beforeobserved, in the vicinity of t\\e paramos or moun-taiti deserts. It produces in abundance maize,plantains, and pucas, of which is made the bestcazave of any in the kingdom, also many trees ofa hard and strong wood, used as a medicine inspotted fevers, and a specific against poisons, sothat it is much esteemed, and they make of itdrinking cups. Here are other trees, good forcuring the flux, their virtue in this disorder havingbeen accidentally discovered as follows. A la-bourer, as he was cutting down one of these trees,let his hatchet fall upon his foot; but rememberingthat by pressing his foot against the tree it wouldstop the blood, he did so, and a splinter thus gettinginto the wound, the cut soon healed without theapplication of any other remedy. Here are largebreeds of horned cattle, and the natives, whoshould amount to 100 Indians, and about as manywhites, are much given to agriculture. Eightleagues from the settlement of Morcote.

Cravo, a river of the former province and go-vernment. It rises in the province of Tunja, nearthe lake of Labranza, passes before the city, towhich it gives its name, and after running manyleagues, enters the Meta.

CRAVO, another river, in the district and juris-diction of Pamplona, of the Nuevo Reyno deGranada. It rises to the e. of the settlement ofCapitanejo, runs s. s. e. and enters the river Caza-nare, according to Beilin, in his map of the courseof a part of the Orinoco; and indeed ^\e doubt ifhe be not correct. In the woods upon its shoreslive some barbarian Indians, the }ietoyes,.Acira-guas, and Guaibas. its mouth is in tat. 3° SO' n.

(CREE Indians, The, inhabit of Littlelake Winnipeg, around fort Daiipiiin, in UpperCanada.)

(CREEKS, an Indian nation, described alsounder tfie name of Muskogulge or Muskogee,in addition to 'which is the following particulars,from the manuscript joarnal of an infeliigent tra-veller : “ Coosa river, and its main branches, formthe re. line of settlements or villages of the Creeks,but their hunting grounds cxtaid 200 miles be-

yond, to the Tombigbee, which is the dividingline between their coufitry and that of the Chac-taws. The smallest of their towns have from 20to 30 ho'.ises in them, and some of them containfrom 130 to 200, that are wholly compact. Thehouses stand in clusters of four, five, six, seven,and eight together, irregularly distributed up anddown the banks of the rivers or small streams.Each cluster of houses contains a clan or family orelations, who eat and live in common. Eac!town has a public square, hot-house, and yard ne.the centre of it, appropriatad to various pubhuses. The following are the names of the prin-cipal towns of the Upper and Lower Creeks thathave public squares ; beginning at the head of theCoosa or Coosa Hatcha river, viz. Upper Utalas,Abbacoochees, Natchez, Coosas, Oteetoocheenas,Pine Catchas, Pocuntullahases, Weeokes, LittleTallassie, Tuskeegees, Coosadas, Alabamas, Ta-wasas, Pawactas, Autobas, Auhoba, W eelump-kees Big,W eelumpkees Little, Wacacoys, Wack-soy, Ochees. The following towns are in thecentral, inland, and high country, between theCoosa and Taliapoosee rivers, in the district calledthe Hillabees, viz. Hillabees, Killeegko, Oakchoys,Slakagulgas, and Wacacoys; on the waters ofthe Taliapoosee, from the head of the river down-ward, the following, viz. Tuckabatchee, Tehassa,Totacaga, New Aork, Chalaacpaulley, Logus-pogus, Oakfuskee, Ufala Little, Ufala Big, Soga-hatches,Tuckabatchees, Big Tallassce or Half-wayHouse, Clewaleys, Coosahatches, Coolamies, Sha-Vt'anese or Savanas, Kenlsulka, and Mnckeleses.The towns of the Low'er Creeks, beginning on thehead waters of the Chattahoosee, and so on down-wards, are Chelu Ninny, Chattahoosee, liohtatoga,Cowetas, Cussitahs, Chalagatscaor, Broken Arrow,Euchces several, Hitchatces several, Palachuolo,Chewackala ; besides 20 towns and villages ofthe Little and Big Chehaus, low down on Flint andChattahoosee rivers. From their roving and un-steady manner of living, it is impossible to deter-mine, 'with much precision, the number of Indiansthat comimse tlie Creek nation. General M‘GiI-livray estimates the number of gun-men to be be-tween 3 and 6000, exclusive of the Semiuolcs, Avhoare of little or no accosmt in war, except as smallparties of marauders, acting independent of thegeneral interest of the others. The wliole numberof individuals may be about 23 or 26,000 souls.Every town and village has one established whitetrader in it, and generally a family of whites, wholiave fled from some part of the tfontiers. Theyoften, to have revenge, and to obtain jdunder thatmay be taken, use their influence to scud out pre«3 Y 2

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