LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

Search for CARIBE* "Caribe, Caribbee, or Charaibes" Caribe*

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

14

the same being the case with regard to the numerous rivers which intersect and fertilize the province ; all of them entering and augmenting the already abundant stream of the Mississippi. In the middle of the lake is a pyramidical mount, of above 100 yards in circumference, composed of a stone similar to crystal, and being the loftiest of any in the province. Its borders abound with cattle, called cibolas, a sort of wild cow, having the neck well covered with a long and soft wool, and affording delicious food to the natives. By the fat which they procure from the numerous anteaters, which breed here, they supply {he want of oil. There are also some castors, and other kinds of mountainanimals. Two leagues from the garrison.

Adaes, a river of the above province, which runs 5. e. in the district or country of the Indians, who give it the denomination ; and enters the river Mexicano.

[ADAIZE are Indians of N. America, who live about 40 miles from Natchitoches, below the Yattasses, on a lake called Lac Macdon, which communicates with the division of Red river that passes by Bayau Pierre. They live at or near where their ancestors have lived from time immemorial. They being the nearest nation to the old Spanish fort, or mission of Adaize, that place was named after them, being about 20 miles from them to the s. There are now but 20 men of them remaining, but more women. Their language differs from all others, and is so difficult to speak or understand, that no nation can speak ten Avoids of it; but they all speak Caddo, and most of them French, to whom they were always attached, and join them against the Natchez Indians. After the massacre of Natchez, in 1798, while the Spaniards occupied the post of Adaize, their priests took much pains to proselyte these Indians to the Roman Catholic religion, but, we are informed, were totally unsuccessful.]

[ADAMS, a township in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, containing 2040 inhabitants, is about 140 miles n. w. of Boston. In the n. part of this town is a great natural curiosity. A pretty mill stream, called Hudson's brook, which rises in Vermont, and falls into the n. branch of Hoosuck river, has, for 30 or 40 rods, formed a very deep channel, in some places 60 feet deep, through a quarry of white marble. Over this channel, where deepest, some of the rocks remain, and form a natural bridge. From the top of this bridge to the water is 62 feet ; its length is about 12 or 15, and its breadth about 10. Partly undcrthis bridge, and about 10 or 12 feet below it, is another, Which is wider, but not so long ; for at the e. end they form one body of rock, 12 or 14 feet thick, and under this the water flows. The rocks here are mostly white, and in other places clouded, like the coarse marble common at Lanesborough, and in other towns in Berkshire county.]

ADAMSTOWN, a town in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, containing about 40 houses; 20 miles n. e. of Lancaster.]

ADAUA, a river of the province and government of St. Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It rises between the Meta and Meteta, runs e. and enters the Orinoco in the port of San Francisco de Borja.

ADAUQUIANA, a small river of the province and government of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia, which rises near the sierra of Parime ; and running from to. to e. enters the sources of the Cauca.

ADA YES. See Mexicano River.]

ADDI, a settlement of the province and government of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of a small river, between the settlements of Uquitoa and Tibutana.

ADDIS, a settlement of the island of Barbadoes, one of the Antilles ; situate in the district of the parish of Christ Church, on the s. coast.

ADDISON, a township of the district of Maine in Washington county, 10 miles s. w. of Machias, on the seaboard, between Englishmen's bay and Pleasant river. It was called No. 6. until it was incorporated in Feb. 1797.]

[Addison County], in Vermont, is on the e, side of lake Champlain, and is divided nearly int© equal parts by Otter creek ; has Chittenden county on the n. and Rutland county on the s. and contains 6449 inhabitants, dispersed in 21 townships. It is about SO miles by 27. A range of the green mountains passes through it. Chief town Middlebury, granted Nov. 1761.]

Addison, a town of the above county (Addison County), containing 401 inhabitants. It lies on lake Champlain, and is separated from Newhaven, on the e. by Otter creek. Snake mountains on the s. e. lie partly in this township, granted 1761.1

ADEQUATANGIE Creek, in New York state, is the eastern headwater of Susquehannah river.]

ADICONI, a port on the coast of the N. sea, in the province and government of Venezuela. It is e. of the peninsula of Paraguana.

[ADMIRALTY Bay, and Port Mulgrave, on the n. w. coast of America, lie in Lat. 59° 31' n. Long. 140° 18'.]

ADOLES, a settlement of Indians, of the pro-

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Romina De León
15

A G A

vince of Orinoco, and part of the Saliva nation,forming a separate district, and situate in theplains of San Juan, of the new kingdom of Gra-nada, near the river Sinaruco. It was destroyedby the Caribee indians in 1684.

ADORATORIO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru, situatew. of Larin.

ADSON’S Town lies near the n. e. line of NewJersey, and s. e. of the Drowned Lands; 27 milesn. of Morristown, and 24 n. w. of Patterson . ]

ADUANA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo, situate on the shore ofthe lake of this name, on the e. side.

ADVANCE. See Forward.

AEIQUAIA, the head settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tonala in Nueva Espana.

AERIUCTUQUEN, a mountain of the pro-vince and colony of Surinam, or part of Guayana,in the Dutch possessions. It is the beginning ofthe great sierra of Binocote, between the riversCutini and Caroni.

AFFREUX, a lake of the province and colonyof Virginia, near the coast.

AFUERA, one of the islands of Juan Fer-nandes, on the S. sea coast, in the kingdom ofChile. About 400 leagues to the n. of Cape Horn.This coast swarms with sea lions and wolves.Lat. 33° 47' s. Long. 80° 41' w.

[Aga|AGA]], a mountain of the province and captain-ship oi Rio Janeiro in Brazil. It is between therivers Irutiba and Tapoana, on the sea-coast.

AGACES, a nation of Indians, of the provinceof Paraguay, on the shore of the river of thisname, towards the e. The people are numerous,valiant, and of a lofty stature. In ancient timesthey were masters of that river, cruising about init, and being the enemies of the Guaranies ; butafter several conflicts, they were at last subjectedby Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, governor of theprovince, in 1642.

AGALTECA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Honduras, in the kingdom of Guate-mala.

AGAMENTIGUS, a river of the province andcolony of New England, of York county, dis-trict of Maine. It is indebted to the ocean for itswaters, through Pascataqua bay ; having no con-siderable aid from streams of fresh water. Itsmouth is about four miles s. from Cape Neddieriver. Small vessels can enter here.]

AGAMENTIGUS, a mountain of consider-able elevation in the district of Maine, distantabout six miles from Bald Head, and eight fromYork harbour. Lat. 43° 12' n, and Long. 70°

AGO 15

43' w. from Greenwich. It is a nofed land-markfor seamen, and is a good directory for the entryof Pascataqua harbour, as it lies very nearly inthe same meridian with it and with Pigeon hill,on Cape Ann. The mountain is covered witliwood and shrubs, and affords pasture up to itssummit, where there is an enchanting prospect.The cultivated parts of the country, especially onthe s. and s. w. appear as a beautiful garden, in-tersected by the majestic river Pascataqua, itsbays and branches. The immense ranges ofmountains on the «. and n. w. afford a sublimespectacle ; and on the sea side the various in-dentings of the coast, from Cape Ann to CapeElizabeth, are plainly in view in a clear day ; andthe Atlantic stretches to the e. as far as the powerof vision extends. At this spot the bearing of thefollowing objects were taken, with a good sur-veying instrument, October 11, 1780.

Summit of the White mountains, n. 15° w.

Cape Porpoise, n. 63° e.

Rochester hill, n. 64° w,

Tuckaway South peak, s. 80° w.

Frost’s hill, Kittery, s. 57° w.

Saddle of Bonabeag, w. 14° w.

Isle of Shoals Meeting-house, s. 6° r.

Varney’s hill, in Dover, distant 10| miles bymensuration, «. 89° zo. Variation of theneedle, 6° te).]

AGAMUNTIC, or Amaguntic Pond, inthe district of Maine, sends its waters northward tothe Chaudiere, through the west branch of thatriver.]

AGCHILLA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Pilaya and Paspaya in Peru.It has in its district seven public chapels, withinfour leagues distance.]

AGENAGATENINGA, a river of the pro-vince and country of the Amazonas, in the Portu-guese territory. It rises in the country of theAnamaris Indians, runs n. and enters the abundantstream of the Madera.

AGIQUA, a river of N. Carolina, which runsn. w. and afterwards turning to the w. enters theCherokees.

AGNALOS, a nation of infidel Indians, of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, inhabiting the moun-tains w. of the river Apure.

AGNAPURAS, a chain of mountains, or acordillera of the kingdom of Peru, whicli run forleagues from n. to s. without termination, andseparate the Taucas from the Chizuitos Indians.

AGOMISO, an island of Hudson’s bay, nearits w. coast; n. n. e. from Albany fort.] >

AGONICHE, a river of Nova Scotia, running

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Romina De León
37

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Romina De León
42

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Romina De León
46

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Bernie
49

This page is not corrected, please help correct this page

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Romina De León
287

Pichihua,

Yaura,

Marangani,

Tinta,

Pitumanca,

Surimana,

Langui,

Checa,

Asiento de Con-doroma,

Santuario de la Vir-gen de Huancani,

San Pedro de Cacha,

Combapata,

Pueblo Nuevo,

Santuario de Tan-gascucal,

Quehue,

Coporaque,

Candelaria.

Its repartimiento amounted to 112,500 dollars,and it paid 900 dollars yearly for alcavala. Thecapital is Tinta.

CANETE, a province and corregimiento ofPeru. Its jurisdiction begins six leagues s. ofLima, and extends as far as 35, following thecoast of the Pacific ocean. It is bounded on then. e. by the province of Huarochiri, on the e. byYauros, on the s. by Yca, on the s. e. by CastroVireyna, and on the w. by the sea. It is 31 leaguesin length from n. to s. and from eight to nine inwidth, from e. to w. It is watered by some streams,of which the most considerable are the Mala onthe n. which rises from the lake Huasca-cocha,in the province of Yauyos, and the Cañete. Onits coast are many small ports and bays, thoughvery insecure and of unequal bottom. It aboundsin wheat, maize, sugar-cane, and all sorts offruit. The lands of this province belong for themost part to noble families at Lima, with whichcapital it carries on a considerable trade in fish,(brought from the coast), in fruit and vegetables,salt procured from the salt grounds of Chielca,and in nitre brought from the town of Mala.Its corregidor used to have a repartimiento of124,000 dollars, and it paid 992 yearly for alca-vala. The settlements of this province are,

Cañete, San Pedro de Mala,

Chilca, Pacarán,

Calango, Almagro,

Chincha, Lunaguana,

Tanqui, Zuñiga.

Coillo,

Canete, a river of the same province, whichrises from the lake Tiell-cocha in Yauyos. Itruns to the w. and enters the sea near the Herbae.At its entrance are to be seen the remains of a fortwhich belonged to the Incas of Peru.

Canete, some islands near the coast of thesame province.

Canete, a port in the same province, fre-quented by small vessels. It is very confined andinsecure.

CANGREJILLOS, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, and juris-

diction of Jujuy, situate on the shore of the riverLaquiaca.

CANGREJO, a large settlement of the sameprovince and government as the former, and ofthe same jurisdiction, situate likewise on the shoreof that river.

CANGREJOS, Island of the, lies at the en-trance of the river Orinoco, in its principal mouth,called Navios, on the n. side. Mr. Bellin callsit Cangray. It is small, and inhabited by CaribeeIndians.

CANI, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the cu-racy of Santa Maria del Valle.

(CANIADERAGO, a lake in Otsego county,New York, nearly as large as Otsego lake, andsix miles w. of it. A stream called Oaks creekissues from it, and falls into Susquehannah river,about five miles below Otsego. The best cheesein the state is said to be made on this creek.)

CANIBALES, or Caribes, a barbarous na-tion of Indians, who are, according to their name,cannibals, inhabiting the islands of the Antillesbefore they were taken and conquered by the Spa-nish, English, and French. There are few ofthese Indians at the present day inhabiting thoseislands ; the greater part are to be found in Domi-nica, which is entirely possessed by them ; theyadore a man who they affirm was uncreated, andthe first of all men, who descended from heaven,and was called Longuo, from whose navel wereborn other men , and some also from his legs, whichhe himself cleft open with a hatchet. With theManicheans, they believe in the two original causesof good and evil, and in the immortality of thesoul ; and whenever any one dies they bury withhim his slaves and servants, thinking they maybe of use to him in the other world. They arepolygamists, very cruel, but dexterous in the useof the bow and arrow ; they are to be found alsoin other parts of the continent. [See Caribes.]

(CANICODEO Creek, a s. w. head water ofTioga river in New York, which interlocks withthe head waters of Genessee river, and joins Co-nesteo creek 26 miles w. n. w. from the Paintedpost.)

CANICUARIS, a barbarous nation of Indians,who live scattered in the woods of Rio Negro tothe n. of Marañon. It is but little known.

CANIN, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chancay in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Canchas.

CANIS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Tillos.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
290

Massachusetts, incorporated in 1797, it beingformerly the n. part of Stoughton.)

CANUARI, a small river of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres. It runs to the n.and enters the Rio Grande of the Portuguese, be-tween the Mbouqui and the Pobatini.

CANUEIRAS, a point of the n. extremity ofthe island of Santa Catalina, on the coast ofBrazil.

CANUERALES, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cuyo in the kingdom ofChile, situate near the river Diamante.

CANUTO, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises in the mountain Ta-cazuruma, runs nearly s. and enters the river ofLa Portuguesa.

CANXA, a small settlement of the head settle-ment of Orizavá, and alcaldía mayor of Yxmi-quilpan, in Nueva España.

(CANY Fork, in the state of Tennessee, is ashort navigable river, and runs n. w. into Cum-berland river, w. of the Salt lick, and oppositeSalt Lick creek, 50 miles in a straight line fromNashville.)

CANZE, a river of the colony and govern-ment of Surinam, in the part of Guayana possessedby the Dutch. It rises between the Berbice andthe Corentin, and after a very round-about course,enters the former, close to its mouth, or where itruns into the sea.

CAO, Santa Maria Magdalena de, asettlement of the province and corregimiento ofTruxillo in Peru, situate in the valley of Chicama.It was the capital in the time of the Indians, andthe number of these 200 years ago was 3000 ; butnow it is reduced to a wretched state, and occu-pies a small spot on the other side of the river,being nine leagues distant from its capital.

Cao, with the dedicatory title of Santiago, todistinguish it from another settlement of the sameprovince and corregimiento, although they areboth equally poor and reduced. Its inhabitantsmaintain themselves by the cultivation of maize,wheat, rice, and vegetables, which they carryfor sale to the other provinces, so that they arefor the most part a race of carriers, and indeedpossess no inconsiderable droves of mules. It issix leagues from its capital, just by the sea.

CAOBAS, River of the, in the island of St.Domingo, in that part possessed by the French.It rises in the valley of San Juan, runs to the w.and afterwards changing its course to the n. w. en-ters the Artibonito.

CAORA, a river which runs down from themountains of Guayana to the s. of the lake

Cassipa, into which it enters ; and afterwardsrunning out at the n. side of this lake, it findsits way through a subterraneous passage, until itempties itself into the Orinoco, on its s. shore.The borders of this river are inhabited by anation of barbarous Indians, who wander con-tinually through the forests without any fixedabode. They are cannibals as well as the otherIndian tribes around them, and with whom theykeep up a continual warfare.

CAPACA, a settlement of the province of Culi-acan in Nueva España ; situate near the head set-tlement.

CAPACHICA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; situate onthe w. shore of the lake Titicaca.

Capachica, a narrow strip of land formed bythe great lake Titicaca. Of these strips there arethree, and this appears, for the distance of a league,to be completely divided from any main land.

CAPACHO, a village under the jurisdiction ofthe town of San Christoval, in the new kingdom ofGranada ; of a warm temperature ; abounding insugar-cane, from which much sugar is manufac-tured, and in cacao ; but it is much infested bythe barbarian Indians, called the Motilones (short-haired), who destroy the plantations. It contains200 house- keepers, and is 24; leagues n. e. ofPamplona, in the road which leads to Mérida andLa Grita, and eight leagues from the city of SanChristoval.

CAPACMARCO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru.

CAPAIA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Aimaraez in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Soraica.

Capaia, another settlement in the province ofBarcelona, and government of Cumana; situate onthe coast, on the banks of a river of the samename.

Capaia, a river of the same province and go-vernment, which rises in the serranía, and aftermaking many turnings runs into the sea, near thecape Codera towards the e.

CAPAIAN, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction ofthe city of Rioja.

CAPAIRE, a settlement of the province of Ve-nezuela, and government of Maracaibo ; situatevery near the coast, at the point Colorada, on theshore of the river Guepe.

(CAPALITA, a large town of North America,and in the province of Oaxaca. The countryround abounds with sheep, cattle, and excellentfruit.)

Last edit about 2 years ago by kmr3934
314

314

C A R I B E.

[only informed of it by the natives of Hispaniola,but having landed himself at Guadalupe on itsfirst discovery, he beheld in several cottagesthe head and limbs of the human body recentlyseparated, and evidently kept for occasional re-pasts. He released at the same time several ofthe natives of Porto Rico, who, having beenbrought captives from thence, were reserved asvictims for the same horrid purpose. But amongthemselves they were peaceable, and towards eachother faithful, friendly, and affectionate. Theyconsidered all strangers indeed as enemies, and ofthe people of Europe they formed a right estima-tion. The antipathy which they manifested to-wards the unoffending natives of the larger islandsappears extraordinary, but it is said to have de-scended to them from their ancestors of Guiana :they considered those islanders as a colony of Ar-rowauks, a nation of South America, with whomthe Caribes of that continent are continually at war.We can assign no cause for such hereditary andirreconcilable hostility. With regard to the peo-ple of Europe, it is allowed, that whenever anyof them had acquired their confidence, it wasgiven without reserve. Their friendship was aswarm as their enmity was implacable. The Ca-ribes of Guiana still fondly cherish the tradition ofRaleigh’s alliance, and to this day preserve theEnglish colours which he left with them at part-ing. (Bancroft, p. 259.) They painted their facesand bodies with arnotto so extravagantly, thattheir natural complexion, which was nearly thatof a Spanish olive, was not easily to be distinguish-ed under the surface of crimson. However, as thismode of painting themselves was practised by bothsexes, perhaps it was at first introduced as a de-fence against the venomous insects so common intropical climates, or possibly they considered thebrilliancy of the colour as highly ornamental. Themen disfigured their cheeks with deep incisionsand hideous scars, which they stained with black,and they painted white and black circles roundtheir eyes ; some of them perforated the cartilagethat divides the nostrils, and inserted the bone ofsome fish, a parrot’s feather, or a fragment of tor-toise-shell ; a frightful custom, practised also bythe natives of New Holland ; and they strung to-gether the teeth of such of their enemies as theyhad slain in battle, and wore them on their legsand arms as trophies of successful cruelty. Todraw the bow with unerring skill, to wield theclub with dexterity and strength, to swim withagility and boldness, to catch fish, and to build acottage, were acquirements of indispensable neces-sity, and the education of their children was well

suited to the attainment of them. One method ofmaking their boys skilful, even in infancy, in theexercise of the bow, was to suspend their food onthe branch of a tree, compelling the hardy urchinsto pierce it with their arrows before they could ob-tain permission to eat. Their arrows were com-monly poisoned, except when they made their mi-litary excursions by night : on those occasionsthey converted them into instruments of still greatermischief ; for, by ai ming the points with pledgetsof cotton dipt into oil, and set on flame, they firedwhole villages of their enemies at a distance. Thepoison which they used was a concoction of nox-ious gums and vegetable juices, and had the pro-perty of being perfectly innocent when received-inlo the stomach; but if communicated immediate-ly to the blood through the slightest wound, it wasgenerally mortal. As soon as a male child wasbrought into the world, he was sprinkled with:some drops of his father’s blood. The ceremoniesused on this occasion were sufficiently painful tothe father, but he submitted without emotion orcomplaint, fondly believing that the same degreeof courage which he had himself displayed wasby these means transmitted to his son. As theboy grew, he was soon made familiar with scenesof barbarity ; he partook of the horrid repasts ofhis nation, and he was frequently anointed withthe fat of a slaughtered Arrowauk : but he was notallowed to participate in the toils of the warrior,and to share the glories of conquest, until his for-titude had been brought to the test. The dawn ofmanhood ushered in the hour of severe trial. Hewas now to exchange the name he had receivedin his infancy for one more sounding and signifi-cant; a ceremony of high importance in the life of aCaribe, but always accompanied by a scene of fero-cious festivity and unnatural cruelty. In times ofpeace, the Caribes admitted of no supremacy but thatof nature. Having no laws, they needed no ma-gistrates. To their old men, indeed, they allowedsome kind of authority, but it was at best ill-de-fined, and must at all times have been insufficientto protect the weak against the strong. In war,experience had taught them that subordinationwas as requisite as courage ; they thereiore electedtheir captains in their general assemblies withgreat solemnity, but they put their pretensions tothe proof with circumstances of outrageous barba-rity. When success attended the measures of acandidate for command, the feast and the triumphawaited his return. He exchanged his name a se-cond time ; assuming in future that of the mostformidable Arrowauk that had fallen by his hand.He was permitted to appropriate to himself as many]

Last edit about 2 years ago by kmr3934
315

C A R I B E. 315

[ of the captives as he thought fit, and his country-men presented to his choice the most beautiful oftheir daughters in reward of his valour. It wasprobably this last-mentioned testimony of publicesteem and gratitude that gave rise in these islandsto the institution of polygamy, which, as hathbeen already observed, prevailed universally amongthem, and still prevails among the Caribes of S.America ; an institution the more excusable, astheir women, from religious motives, carefullyavoided the nuptial intercourse after pregnancy.Though frequently bestowed as the prize of suc-cessful courage, the wife, thus honourably obtain-ed, was soon considered of as little value as thecaptive. Deficient in those qualities which alonewere estimable among the Caribes, the femaleswere treated rather as slaves than companions:they sustained every species of drudgery ; theyground the maize, prepared the cassavi, gatheredin the cotton, and wove the hammoc; nor werethey allowed even the privilege of eating in pre-sence of their husbands. Under these circum-stances, it is not wonderful that they were less pro-lific than the women of Europe. Father JosephGumilla, in his account of the nations borderingon the Orinoco, relates (tom. i. p. 207. Fr. trans-lation), that the Caribes of the continent punishtheir women caught in adultery like the ancientIsraelites, “ by stoning them to death before anassembly of the people ;" a fact not recorded by anyother writer. We know but little concerning theirdomestic economy, their arts, manufactures, andagriculture ; their sense of filial and paternal ob-ligations, their religious rights and funeral cere-monies. Such further information, however, inthese and other respects, as authorities the leastdisputable afford, we have abridged in the follow-ing detached observations. Besides the ornamentswhich we have noticed to have been worn by bothsexes, the women, on arriving at the age of pu-berty, were distinguished also by a sort of buskinor half boot made of cotton, which surrounded thesmall part of the leg. The same sort of brodequinor buskin is worn by the female Hottentots andother nations of Africa; a distinction, however, towhich such of their females as had been taken inthe chance of war dared not aspire. In otherrespects, both male and female appeared as nakedas our first parents before the fall. Like them, asthey knew no guilt, they knew no shame ; nor wasclothing thought necessary to personal comfort,where the chill blast of winter is never lelt. Theirhair was uniformly of a shining black, straight, andcoarse ; but they dressed it with daily care, andadorned it with great art, the men, in particular,

decorating their heads with feathers of various co-lours. As their hair thus constituted their chiefpride, it was an unequivocal proof of the sincerityof their sorrow, when, on the death of a relationor friend, they cut it short like their slaves andcaptives, to whom the privilege of wearing longhair was rigorously denied. Like most other na-tions of the new hemisphere, they eradicated, withgreat nicety, the incipient beard, and all super-fluous hairs on their bodies ; a circumstance whichhas given rise to the false notion that all the Abo-rigines of America were naturally beardless. Onthe birth of a child, its tender and flexible skullwas confined between two small pieces of wood,which, applied before and behind, and firmlybound together on each side, elevated the fore-head, and occasioned it and the back part of theskull to resemble two sides of a square ; a customstill observed by the miserable remnant of Red Ca-ribes in the island of St. Vincent. It has beensaid by anatomists, that the coronal suture of newborn children in the West Indies is commonlymore open than that of infants born in colder cli-mates, and the brain more liable to external in-jury. Perhaps, therefore, the Indian custom ofdepressing the os frontis and the occiput, was ori-ginally meant to assist the operation of nature inclosing the skull. They resided in villages whichresembled an European encampment, for their ca-bins were built of poles fixed circularly in theground, and drawn to a point at the top ; theywere then covered w ith leaves of the palm tree. Inthe centre of each village was a building of supe-rior magnitude to the rest: it was formed withgreat labour, and served as a public hall or statehouse, wherein we are assured that the men (ex-cluding the women) had their meals in common.These halls were also the theatres where their youthwere animated to emulation, and trained to mar-tial enterprise by the renown of their warriors andthe harangues of their orators. Their arts and ma-nufactures, though few, displayed a degreeof inge-nuity which one would have scarcely expected tofind amongst a people so little removed from astate of mere animal nature as to reject all dress assuperfluous. Columbus observed an abundance ofsubstantial cotton cloth in all the islands which hevisited ; and the natives possessed the art of stain-ing it with various colours, though the Caribes de-lighted chiefly in red. Of this cloth they madehammocs, or hanging beds, such as are now usedat sea ; for Europe has not only copied the pat-tern, but preserved also the original name. Allthe early Spanish and French writers expressly as-sert, that the original Indian name for their swing-

Last edit about 2 years ago by kmr3934
316

316

C A R I B E.

[ing beds was amack or hamack, but Dr. John-son derives the English word hammoc froni theSaxon. They possessed likewise the art of mak-ing vessels of clay for domestic uses, which theybaked in kilns like the potters of Europe. Theruins of many of these kilns were visible not longsince in Barbadoes, where specimens of the manu-facture are still frequently dug up; and Mr.Hughes, the historian of that island, observes,that they far surpassed the earthen ware made bythe Negroes, in thinness, smoothness, and beauty.(Nat. Hist, of Barbadoes, p, 8.) Ligon, who vi-sited this island in 1647, declares, that some ofthese vessels which he saw even surpassed anyearthen ware made in England, “ both,” to use hisown words, “ in finesse of mettle and curiosity ofturninge.” Besides those, they invented variousother utensils for economical purposes, Avhich areenumerated by Labat. The baskets which theycomposed of the fibres of the palmeto-leaves weresingularly elegant ; and we are told that their bowsand arrows, and other weapons, displayed a neat-ness and polish which the most skilful Europeanartist would have found it difficult to have excel-led, even with European tools. We are told, ongood authority, that among the Caribes of thecontinent there was no division of land ; the har-vests were deposited in public granaries, whenceeach family received its proportion of the publicstock. Rochford indeed observes, that all theirinterests were in common. Their food, both ve-getable and animal, excepting in the circumstanceof their eating human flesh, seems to have been thesame, in most respects, as that of the natives ofthe larger islands. But although their appetiteswere voracious, they rejected many of the bestbounties of nature. Of some animals they held theflesh in abhorrence : these were the pecary or Me-xican hog, the manati or sea cow, and the turtle.Labat observes, that they scrupled likewise to eatthe eel, which the rivers in several of the islandssupply in great plenty. The striking conformityof these, and some other of their prejudices andcustoms, to the practices of the Jewx, has notescaped the notice of historians. On the birth ofhis first son, the father retired to his bed, and fast-^ ed with a strictness that often endangered life.Lafitau, observingjhat the same custom was prac-tised by the Tybarenians of Asia, and the Iberiansor ancient inhabitants of Spain, and is still in useamong the people of Japan, not only urges thiscircumstance as a proof, among others, that thenew world was peopled from the old, but pretendsto discover in it also some traces of the doctrine oforiginal sin : he supposes that the severe penance

thus voluntarily submitted to by the father was atfirst instituted in the pious view of protecting hisissue from the contagion of hereditary guilt, avert-ing the wrath of offended Omnipotence at thecrime of our first parents, and expiating their guiltby his sufferings. The ancient Thracians, as weare informed by Herodotus, when a male childwas brought into the world, lamented over him insad vaticination of his destiny, and they rejoicedwhen he was released by death from those miserieswhich they considered as his inevitable portion inlife ; but whatever might have been the motivesthat first itiduced the Caribes to do penance onsuch occasions, it would seem that grief and dejec-tion had no great share in them ; for the ceremonyof fasting was immediately succeeded by rejoic-ing and triumph, by drunkenness and debauchery.Their lamentations for the dead seem to have ari-sen from the more laudable dictates of genuine na-ture ; for, unlike the Thracians on these solem-nities, they not only despoiled their hair, as wehave before related, but when the master of the fa-mily died, the surviving relations, after buryingthe corpse in the centre of his own dwelling, withmany demonstrations of unaffected grief, quitted thehouse altogether, and erected another in a distantsituation. The dead body they placed in the gravein a sitting posture, with the knees to the chin. Itis asserted, and we believe with truth, that the ex-pectation of a future state has prevailed amongstall mankind in all ages and countries of the world.It is certain that the idea of a future state prevail-ed among the Caribes ; they not only believed thatdeath was not the final extinction of their being,but pleased themselves also with the fond conceit,that their departed relations were secret spectatorsof their conduct; that they still sympathized intheir sufferings, and participated in their welfare.To these notions they added others of a dreadfultendency ; for, considering the soul as susceptibleof the same impressions, and possessing the samepassions as when allied to the body, it was thoughta religious duty to their deceased heroes, to sacri-fice at their funerals some of the captives which hadbeen taken in battle. It was their custom to erectin every cottage a rustic altar, composed of ba-nana leaves and rushes, whereon they occasionallyplaced the earliest of their fruits and the choicestof their viands, as humble peace-o.ff’erings, throughthe mediation of their inferior deities, to incensedOmnipotence : for it is admitted, that their devo-tions consisted less in the effusions of thankfulness,than in deprecations of wrath. They not onlybelieved in the existence of demons and evil spirits,but offered to them also, by the hands of their]

2

Last edit about 2 years ago by kmr3934
321

CAR

321

emolument which used to be derived to the Eng-lish froPA the skins of the castor, is at presentgreatly abridged from the circumstance of the In-dians invariably destroying this animal; but theloss is in a great measure made up from the greatgain acquired in the sale of turpentine, fish, andpitch. Here they cultivate quantities of indigoof three sorts, much maize, and in the low landsexcellent rice. All this province is a plain 80miles in length, carrying on a great commerce inthe above productions, and formerly that of ricewas very considerable; it being computed to haveyielded that article to the value of 150,000/. ster-ling per annum. In its woods are many exquisitekinds of timber, and the country abounds withrabbits, hares, dantas, deer, pheasants, partridges,cranes, pigeons, and other birds, and with num-bers of ravenous and fierce wolves, against theattacks of which it is difficult to preserve thecattle. The European animals have also multi-plied here astonishingly, so that it is not unusualfor persons, who at first had not more than three orfour cows, now to possess as many thousands.These two provinces forming Carolina have 10navigable rivers, with an infinite number of smallernote, all abounding in fish ; but they hare fewgood ports, and the best of these is Cape Fear.N. Carolina is not so rich as is S. Carolina, andDenton was formerly the capital of the former,but it is at present reduced to a miserable village ;the capital of both is Charlestown, which since thelast w^r is independent of the jEnglish, togetherwith all the country, which now forms one of the 13provinces composing the United States of America.[See North Carolina and South Carolina.]

(CAROLINE County, in Virginia, is on the s.side of Rappahannock river, which separates itfrom King George’s county. It is about 40 milessquare, and contains 17,489 inhabitants, including10,292 slaves.)

(Caroline County, on the e. shore in Mary-land, borders on Delaware state to the e. and con-tains 9506 inhabitants, including 2057 slaves. Itschief town Danton.)

CARONI, a settlement of the province ofGuayana, and government of Cumana ; one ofthose of the missions held in that province by theCatalanian Capuchin fathers.

Caroni, another, in the government of Mara-caibo, and jurisdiction of Varinas. It is very poorand of a hot temperature, but abounding in fruitsof maize, yucas, plaintains, and sugar-canes.

Caroni, another, in the government of the NuevoReyno de Granada ; situate on a lofty spot, andone of the most pleasant and delightful of any in the

whole province. It abounds in gold mines, andis fertile in all the fruits peculiar to the climate,but it is much reduced.

Caroni, a large and abundant river of the pro-vince of Guayana. It rises in the mountains in-habited by the Mediterranean Caribes Indians,runs many leagues, laving the territory of the Ca-puchin missionaries of Guayana. Its shores arevery delightful, from the variety of trees and birdsfound upon them. It enters the Orinoco on the s.side, eight leagues from the garrison of Guayana,and 72 leagues before this river enters the sea, be-ing divided into two arms, which form a smallisland. It is very abundant and wide, but it isnot navigable, on account of the rapidity of its cur-rent, and from its being filled with little islands andshoals, as likewise on account of a great waterfallor cataract, which causes a prodigious noise, and isclose to the mission and settlement of Aguacagua.Its waters are very clear, although at first sightthey appear dark and muddy, which effect is pro-duced from the bed of the river being of a sand ofthis colour. Its source, though not accuratelyknown, is affirmed by the Caribes Indians to bein the snowy sierra to the n. of the lake of Parime,that also being the source by which this lake issupplied. At its entrance into the Orinoco, itgushes with &uch impetuosity as to repel the watersof this river the distance of a gun’s shot, [or, as'Depons observes, half a league. Its course is di-rectly from s. to n. and its source is more than100 leagues from its mouth.]

CAROPI, a river of the island and governmentof Trinidad. It runs from e. to w. and enters thesea in the gulf Triste.

==CARORA, S. Juan Bautista del Por-tillo DE==, a city of the province and governmentof Venezuela, founded by Captain John Salamancain 1572, and not in 1566, as is asserted by FatherColeti, in the Siege of Baraquiga. It is situate inthe savanas or Uanuras ; is of a hot temperature,but very healthy, although deficient in water,since the river Morere, which passes in its vicinity,affords but a trifling stream in tlie summer, and isat times entirely dry. In its district are bred allkinds of cattle, but particularly thegoat, as the quan-tities of thorns and thistles found in this countryrender it peculiarly adapted for the nourishmentof this animal. It abounds in very fine grains,also in aromatic balsams and gums, noted for thecure of w'ounds. At present it is reduced to amiserable population, unworthy of the name of acity, consisting of Mustees, Mulattoes, and some In-dians.; but it still preserves a very good parishchurch, a convent of monks of St. hhancisco, and

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
334

334

CAS

CAS

Presurapscot river. It has a good harbour at itsmouth for small vessels, and has several mills uponit ; two miles higher a fall obstructs the navigation.Between it and Kennebeck there are no rivers ;some creeks and harbours of Casco bay throw them-selves into the main land, affording harbours forsmall vessels, and intersecting the country in variousforms.)

CASCONA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Antioquía ; situate at the mouth ofthe river Nare, at its entrance into the Mag-dalena.

CASCUEMBEC, a small island of Nova Scotia,close to the w. point of the island of San Juan.

CASIBANI, a river of the province and countryof the Amazonas : it rises in the cordillera of theMochovos and Pichambios Indians, runs in a ser-pentine course to the n. then inclining for manyleagues to the s. e. enters the Maranon or Amazonas,near the settlement of N uestra Seilora de Guada-lupe.

CASIDI, a river of the province and governmentof Guayana : it enters the Orinoco, according toBeilin, but which is afterwards contradicted by hisown map, since it is^there represented as having itssource to the e. of the city of Pamplona, and asrunning into the river Apure.

CASIGUA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Maracaibo ; situate on the coast, andnear the entrance or mouth of the great lake.

CASILDA, Ensenada de, a bay on the s. coastof the island of Cuba.

CASIMBUCO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chayanta or Charcas in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Pocoata.

CASIMENA, a settlement of the jurisdiction ofthe city of Santiago de los Atalayas, in the govern-ment of San Juan de los Llanos, of the NuevoReyno de Granada : it is of a very hot temperature,and abounds in fruits of a similar climate. Its na-tives, who are numerous and consist of the NeolitosIndians, are very industrious, docile, and of gooddispositions, having been reduced to the faith bythe missionaries of the extinguished society of Je-suits. The settlement is at present in the charge ofthe barefooted order of St. Francis, and lies threeleagues from the settlement of Surimena, on theshore of the large river Meta.

CASIPA, a large lake of the province of NuevaAndalucía Austral or South, to the w. ofthe Vaca-ronis Indians : it is 30 leagues in length from n. to s.and 24 in width from e. to w. Four large riversflow from it, the principal of which areArous or Aroiand Caroa, the which enter the Orinoco on its e.side. Its woods are inhabited by some barbarous

nations of Caribes Indians, such as are the Canuristo the n. the Bsparagois to the e. the Aravis to thes. and the Chaguas and Lasipagotes to thezw. Inthis lake tortoises and alligators abound ; its watersare hurtful, and the climate here is unhealthy;hurricanes are frequent here, from the winds whichblow from the neighbouring mountains.

CASIPOURE, a river of the province ofGuayana, in the French possessions ; it runs fromm. to e. and enters the sea, its mouth being half aleague wide, near cape Orange, in 5° 27'.

Casipoure, a cape or point of the coast oppositethe side of cape Orange.

CASIQUIN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito, whichruns many leagues, and enters the Maranon.

CASIRI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Parinacocha in Peru ; annexed to the.curacy of its capital : in its vicinity is an elevatedmountain, in which great Indian wealth is said tobe secreted.

CASIRIAQUI, Cano de, a large and copiousarm of the river Negro, by which this communi-cates with the Orinoco, and through that with theMaranon or Las Amazonas ; which communication,however, has been frequently doubted and con-troverted since the short time of its having beendiscovered.

CASIROUGE, a small island of the e. coast ofNewfoundland, betweea Bellisle and the portGobos.

CASIRRUENTI, a large and copious riverabounding in fine fish, of the province and govern-ment of San Juan de los Llanos : it passes throughthe llanuras of Cazanare and Meta, and, near thesettlement of San Joaquin de Atanari, enters theMeta.

CASIUINDO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, in the jurisdiction of thecity of Xuxuy ; annexed to the curacy of Cochino-ca ; it has two hermitages, which serve as chapelsof ease, with the dedicatory title of Rinconada andRio de San Juan. The natives fabricate powderof excellent quality, and in its district are goldmines, which are not worked.

CASMA, Alta, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Santa in Peru ; situate on thecoast of the S. sea, with a moderately good port.It was sacked in 1586 by Edward David, an Eng-lish pirate.

Casma, Alta, another settlement of this pro-vince, called, for distinction’s sake, Casma Baxa.

CASMAL, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Olleros.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
339

CAT

CAT 339

CATAMARCA, S. Fernando de, a city ofthe province and government of Tucumán, found-ed by Juan Gomez Zurita, in 1538, in the fertileand extensive valley of Conando. It has a fort torepress the encroachments of the Indians. Thename of Canete was given it in honour to the vice-roy who then commanded in Peru ; this was after-wards changed to London, in honour to the queenof England, wife of Philip II. king of Spain. Theinquietudes caused amongst the inhabitants by theinfidel Indians induced Don Geronimo Luis deCabrera, son of a governor of that province, in1663, to remove it to another not less fertile val-ley, and to give it the name of San J uan de la Ri-vero ; and lastly, by the permission of the king,in 1683, it was transferred to a spot in the valleyof Catamarca ; where it still remains, under thesame title, at 80 leagues distance from its first sta-tion. It has, besides the parish church, a conventof the Recoletos monks of St. Francis, with thededicatory title of San Pedro de Alcantara ; anhospital of Merced ; aud a house of residence,which formerly belonged to the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits. On the w. side of the val-ley is a mountain in which there are gold mines ;and on the w. also from n. to s. runs a serrama^ theskirts of which are for many leagues covered withestates and cultivated grounds, and filled, fromthe abundance of fine pastures, with lage and smallcattle and with mules. A tolerably large riverruns through the valley in the rainy season, andterminates in some lakes M’hich are formed by itabout 30 leagues s. of the city. The commerce ofthis city is very small, so that there is no coin cur-rent ; and even the payments of the royal dutiesare paid in effects, and in the productions of thecountry, such as cotton, linens, pepper, brandy,and wheat. Lat. 27° s.

Catamarca, a settlement of the same provinceand government ; situate in the district of thiscity.

CATAMBUCU, a settlement of the provinceand government of Popayán in the kingdom ofQuito.

CATAN, San Francisco de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxamarca inPeru ; annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CATANERA, an ancient province of Peru, inthat of Condesuyos, in which dwelt the nation ofthe Quechuas. It was subjected to the empire bythe Inca Capac Y upanqui, fifth Emperor.

CATANIAPU, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises to the s. of the settlement of San Joseph de

Mapoyes, runs w. and enters the Orinoco close tothe torrent of Los Atures.

CATAPUIN, San Juan de, a settlement ofthe province and government of Quixos y Macasin the kingdom of Quito.

CATARAQUA, or Catarakui, a copiousriver of the province and country of the IroqueesIndians. It rises from the lake Ontario, runs n. e.and continues its course as far as Quebec, fromwhence it takes the name of St. Lawrence, andthen enters the sea.

Cataraqua, a bay on the n. coast of lakeOntario, in New France or Canada.

CATARUBEN, a settlement of the missions ofSan Juan de los Llanos in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; one of the seven which were held bythe regulars of the company of Jesuits, and be-longing to the nation of the Salivas Indians. TheCaribes burnt and destroyed it in 1684.

CATAROSI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aymaraez in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Pampamarca.

CATAS-ALTAS, a settlement or village of thePortuguese, in the province and captainship ofEspiritu Santo, and kingdom of Brazil ; situate onthe shore of the river Doce or Dulce.

CATAUBA, a river of Virginia, which runsn. e. and enters the Thames.

Catauba, another river in S. Carolina, whichruns s. e. and enters the Watery.

(CATAWESSY, a township in Northumberlandcounty, Pennsylvania ; situate on the s. e. bankof the e. branch of Susquehannah river, oppositethe mouth of Fishing creek, and about 20 milesn. e. of Sunbury.)

CATCA, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Paucartambo in Peru.

CATCH, or Boutin, a port of the coast ofNova Scotia, between the bay of Cheboucto andtbe island of Samborough.

CATEMU, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom of Chile,on the shore of the river Quillota.

(CATHANCE, or Cathants, a small river inLincoln county, Maine, which rises in Topsham,and empties into Merry Meeting bay, and has se-veral mills upon it.)

(CATHERINE’S Isle, St, a small island inthe captainship of St. Vincent’s in Brazil, be-longing to the Portuguese, 47 leagues s. of Cana-nea island. It is about 23 miles from n. to s. in-habited by Indians, wiio assist the Portugueseagainst their enemies, the natives of Brazil. Lak27° 10' s. Long. 47° 15' w.)

X X 2

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
341

shore of the river Maranon, near the port of Cu-rupa.

CAUIANA, an island of the N. sea; situate inthe middle of the mouth of the large river Ma-rañon.

CAUIJA, a lake of the province and govern-ment of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. It is n.of that of Ipava, from whence, according to some,the river Orinoco takes its rise.

CAUINAS, an ancient and barbarous nation ofthe province of Charcas in Peru, which wasbounded by the nation of the Canches ; here wasa superb palace belonging to the Incas, builtupon the top of an high mountain, the remains ofwhich are yet to be seen near the settlement ofUrcos, and those of Querquesana and Quiquijana,these being about nine miles distant from the afore-said palace.

CAUIUSARI, a river of the province and go-vernment of San Juan de los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It rises in the mountains ofthe country of the Guames Indians, runs e. formany leagues, and enters the Apure,

CAUJUL, a settlement of the province and cor-regimienio of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Andajes.

CAUMARES, a barbarous nation inhabitingthewoods which lie upon the banks of the river Ma-ranon towards the n. Some of them were reducedto the faith by the missionaries of the extinguishedcompany of Jesuits of the province of Mainas, andformed part of the population of the settlement ofSan Ignacio de Pevas.

CAUN, a settlement of the missions which wereheld by the regulars of the company of the Jesuits,in the province of Cinaloa.

CAUO, or Couvo, a river of the province andgovernment of Guayana. It runs towards the e.and enters the sea, at the distance of leaguesfrom the mouth of the river Aprovaca : its bankson the e. side are inhabited by some barbarous In-dians of the Yaus nation.

CAUOS, a barbarous nation of Indians who in--habit the woods to the w. of the river Putumayo.They are thought to be a branch or tribe of theAbives, and are but little known.

CAUQUE, a settlement of the kingdom andpresidency of Guatemala.

CAUQUENES, a river of the kingdom andgovernment of Chile. It rises in the mountains ofits cordillera, and enters the Maule.

CAUQUICURA, an ancient and large provinceof the kingdom of Peru, to the s. of Cuzco. Itwas conquered and united to the monarchy byMayta Capac, fourth Emperor.

CAUQUIS, a nation of Indians of the kingdomof Chile, and one of the most warlike and valorous,who resisted and put a check to the conquests ofYupanqui, eleventh Emperor of Peru, obligingliim to retreat with his army to Coqnimbo.

CAURA, a large and copious river of the pro-vince of Guayana, and government of Cumana.It rises in some very lofty sierras, and its shoresare inhabited by many Indiatis, wlio retreat hitherwhen pursued by the Caribes, who are accustonicdto kill the adults, and to ko('p as prisoners tliewomen and children, iit order to sell them to theDutch. This river is the largest of the kingdomof Tierra Firme ever discovered since that of theOrinoco. It runs 60 leagues before it enters into thislatter river, through chains of rocks, which so im-pede its navigation as to render it unsafe for anybut very small craft. On its shores are two forts,one at tlie mouth, where it enters the Orinoco ; andthe other at its mid-course. The Maranon andthe Orinoco also communicate with it by an armwhich is very considerable, and is called the RioNegro.

Caura, a settlement of the jurisdiction of thetown of San Gil, in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra.-nada.

CAURANTA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cumaná ; situate on the coast and atthe point of Paria.

CAURE, a small river of the province and go-vernment of San Juan de los Llanos in the NuevoReyno de Granada. It rises opposite that city, to-wards the s. and then enters the Ariari.

CAURI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimienlo of Tarma in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Cayna.

CAURIMPO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa ; situate between the fortsRio and Mayo. It is n reduccion of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the company ofJesuits.

CAUSAN, a river of the ])rovince and colonyof Georgia, is the same as that of the name ofCombahi. It runs till it enters the sea.

CAUTE, a small river of the island of Cuba,Which runs rw. and enters the sea.

CAUTEN, a large river of the kingdom ofChile, in the district and province of Repocura.It rises in the district of Maquegua, runs continu-ally from e. to vs. collecting the waiters of manyother rivers, in such a gentle and mild course, thatit has also acquired the name of Las Damns. Itpasses before the Ciudad Imperial, and enters theS. sea. It is 500 toises broad at its mouth, and ofsufficient depth to admit of a ship of the line ; at

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
364

364

C H A

C H A

CHAQUIMINAS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Asangaro in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Sandia in the province of Ca-rabaya.

CHARABAYE, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on the shoreof a river in the district of the city of Caracas, andto the e. of the town of Victoria.

CHARACATO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Arequipa in Peru. In itschurch is a miraculous image of Nuestra Senorade la Purificacion or Candelaria, to which singulardevotion is paid.

CHARAI, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Cinaloa ; situate on the shore ofa river of the fort which lies between the settle-ments of Ziribijoa and Mochicauchi.

(CHARAIBES, See Caribe.)

CHARALA, a settlement of the jurisdiction ofthe town of San Gil, in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada, is, at it were, a suburb to the settlement ofMongui, and it is (being very poor and reduced)annexed to the curacy of the same. Its tempera-ture is mild, and abounds in pure good water, andin the productions of a hot climate.

CHARANDO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Guimeo, and alcaldia mayor of Cirandaro,in Nueva Espafia ; annexed to the curacy of Turi-cato.

CHARAPA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Periban in Nueva España ;situate in the loftiest part of the sierra, fromwhence its temperature is so cold that it is seldomany crops can be gathered from the seeds that aresown. It contains 209 families of Indians, 80 inthe wards of its district, and a convent of the reli-gious order of St. Francis : lies e. of its head settle-ment.

CHARAPE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Jaen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito.

CHARAPOTO, a settlement of the district ofPuerto Viejo, and government of Guayaquil, in thekingdom of Quito, at a small distance from thesea-coast and bay of its name ; this title beingalso applied to the point which forms the samebay.

CHARAZANI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHARBON, Rio del, a river of N. Carolina,which runs n. and enters the Conhaway. Thewhole of it abounds in cataracts, and its watersthrow up immense quantities of coal, which wasthe cause of its being thus named.

CHARCA, a settlement of the province and

corregimiento of Chayanta in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Sacaca.

CHARCANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacochas in Peru.

CHARCAS, an extensive province of the king-dom of Peru, composed of various others. Its ju-risdiction comprehends the district of this royalaudience, which begins at Vilcanota, of the cor-regimiento of Lampa and bishopric of Cuzco, andextends as far as Buenos Ayres to the s. It isbounded on the e. by Brazil, the meridian servingas a limit ; and reaching w. as far as the corregi-miento of Atacama, which is of its district, andforms the most n. part of this province in that di-rection, and being closed in on its other sides bythe kingdom of Chile : is 300 leagues in length, in-cluding the degrees of latitude from 20° to 28° s . :is in many parts very thinly peopled, and coveredwith large desert tracts, and rugged and impene-trable mountains, and again by the elevated cordil-leras of the Andes, and the spacious llanuras orpampas, which serve to mark its size and the relativedistances of its territories. Its temperature through-out is extremely cold, although there are not want-ing parts which enjoy a moderate warmth. At thetime that this province was in the possession of theIndians, and previous to the entrance of the Spa-niards, many well-inhabited provinces went jointlyunder the name of Charcas ; and the conquest ofthese was first undertaken by Capac Yupanqui,fifth Emperor ; but he was not able to pass the ter-ritory of the Tutiras Indians and of Chaqui. Hereit was that his conquests terminated : nor did thesubjection of these parts extend farther than Col-laysuyo until after his death, when he was suc-ceeded by his son the Inca Roca, sixth Emperor,who carried on still farther the victories which hadbeen already gained, conquering all the nations asfar on as that of Chuquisaca, where he afterwardsfounded the city of this name, called also La Plata.After that the Spaniards had reduced that part ofPeru, extending from Tumbez to Cuzco, and thatthe civil wars and dissensions which existed be-tween these were at an end, they endeavoured tofollow up their enterprise by making a conquest ofthe most distant nations. To this end, in 1538,Gonzalo Pizarro sallied forth with a great force,and attacking the Charcas and the Carangues,found in them such a spirited opposition, that afterseveral battles he was brought to think this objectwas nearly impracticable : this idea was strength-ened by the reception he had met with from theChuquisacas, who in many conflicts had given himconvincing proofs of their valour and warlikespirit ; indeed it is thought, that had he not just

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
369

C H A

C H A

369

and pleasantly situated. Before the deslrnction oftil is town by the British in 1775, several brandiesof mannfadures were carried on to great advan-tage, some of which have been since revived : par-ticularly tlic manufacture of pot and pearl ashes,ship-building, rum, leather in all its branches,silver, tin, brass, and pewter. Three rope-walkshave lately been erected in this town, and tlie in-crease of its houses, population, trade, and naviga-tion, have been very great within a few' years past.This town is a port of entry in conjunction withBoston. At the head of the neck there is a bridgeover Mystic river, which connects Charlestown withMalden.)

CHARLESTOWN, another city of the island ofNevis, one of the Caribes, in the Antilles ; in w Inchthere are beautiful houses and shops well providedwith every thing ; is defended by a fort calledCharles. It has a market every Saturday, begin-ning at sun-rise and finishing at mid-day, whitherthe Negroes bring 'maize, names, garden-herbs,fruits, &c. In the parish of San Juan is a pieceof sulphureous land, in the upper extremity of anopening of the land, called Solfatara, or Sulphurgut, which is so hot as to be telt through the solesof the shoes when being trodden upon. At thefoot of the declivity of this same part of the city,is a small hot stream, called the Bath, which beingsupposed to rise from the aforesaid spot, loses itselfshortly in the sand. Towards the side lying nextthe sea are two fountains, one of hot water, theother of cold, and of these two are formed the lakeof Blackrock, the waters of which are of a moderatewarmth, and which lies to the n. of the city, beingnearly a quarter of a mile’s distance from the placewhere are caught eels and silver-fish, resemblingthe cod and slimgut in flavour, the latter of whichlias a head disproportioned to its body. [A prodi-gious piece ol Nevis mountain falling down in anearthquake several years ago, left a large vacuity,which is still to be seen. The altitude of thismountain, taken by a quadrant from Charlestownbay, is said to be a mile and a half perpendicular ;and from the said bay to the top, four miles. Thedeclivity from this mountain to the town is verysteep half-way, but afterwards easy of ascent.] InLat. 17° 8' u. and long. 62° 40' w.

Charlestown, another city of the island ofBarbadoes ; the situation of which is two leaguesfrom that of San Miguel. It has a good port de-fended by two castles ; the one beyoml the other,and both commanding the city and the road: inthe middle of them is a platform. Tlse inhabitantscarry on a great trade with the other islands.

(CHARLESTOWN, a township in Montgomery

county. New York, on the s. side of Mohawk river,about 32 miles w. of Schenectady. By the statecensus of 1796, 456 of the inhabitants are elec-tors.)

(Charlestown, a township in Mason county,Kentucky ; situate on the Ohio, at the mouth ofLauren’s creek. It contains but few houses, andis six miles n. of Washington, and 60 n. e. of Lex-ington. Lat. 38° 28' n.)

(Charlestown, a township in Chester county,Pennsylvania.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, on the e. side of Connecticutriver, 30 miles s. of Dartmouth college, upwards of70 n. of Northampton, 116 n. of w. of Boston, 120w. by 71. of Portsmouth, and 431 n. n. e. of Phila-delphia. It was incorporated in 1753, and con-tains 90 or 100 houses, a Congregational church,a court-house, and an academy. The road fromBoston to Quebec passes through this town. Lat.43° 16' n. Long. 72° 23' w. A small internaltrade is carried on here.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cecil county,Maryland, near the head of Chesapeak bay ; sixmites e. n. e. from the mouth of Susquehannahriver, 10 zo. s. w. from Elktown, and 50 s. w. by zb.from Philadelphia. Here are about 20 houses,chiefly inhabited by fishermen employed in theherring fishery. Lat. 39° 36' w.)

(Charlestown, a district in the lower countryof S. Carolina, subdivided into 14 parishes. Thislarge district, of which the city of Charleston is thechief town, lies between Santee and Combaheerivers. It pays 21,473/. 14s. 6d. sterling, taxes. Itsends to the state legislature 48 representatives and13 senators, and one member to congress. It con-tains 66,986 inhabitants, of whom only 16,352 arefree.)

(Charlestown, a village in Berkley county,Virginia ; situate on the great road leading fromPhiladelphia to Winchester ; eight miles fromShepherdstown, and 20 from Winchester.)

(Charlestown, a township in Washingtoncounty, Rhode Island state, having the Atlanticocean on the s. and separated from Richmond on the71. by Charles river, a water of Fawcatiick. Some ofits ponds empty into Fawcatiick river, otliers intothe sea. It is 19 miles /L ti:;. of Newport, andcontains 2022 inhabitants, including 12 slaves. Afew years ago there w'ere about 500 Indians in thestate ; the greater part of them resided in tin's town-ship. They are peaceable and well disposed togovernment, and s|5cak the English language.)

CHARLETON, an island situate near the e.coast of the country of Labrador, in the part of N.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
457

C H O

C H O

457

down from the mountains to the jy. of the RachcsIndians, and runs 52 leagues from s. to «. e. untilit enters the Marmore together with the Guapaix,opposite the settlement and reduccion of Loreto,which lies to the s.

CHOPO, a settlement of the government andjurisdiction of Pamplona in the JNuevo Reyno deGranada. It is of a very mild climate, andabounds in sugar-canes, plantains, maize, and manysorts of vegetables ; these being the principal branchof its trafiic with the Indians, Avho carry them forsale to the capital, which lies at a small distancefrom hence, in the road leading to M6rida andGibraltar. It contains 50 Indians, and almost asmany indigent settlers.

[CHOPS, The, in Kennebeck river, are threemiles from Swan Island; Avhich see.]

CHOPTANK, a large navigable river of theprovince and colony of Maryland, [emptying it-self into Chesapeak bay.]

CHOPTANK, Little, another (river) of the same pro-vince Maryland. It runs w. and enters the sea in the bay ofChesapeak.

CHOQUE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatarabo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Acros.

CHOQUECAMATA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregtmiento of Cochabamba in Peru.

CHOQUELIMPE, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Arica in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Copia.

CHOQUES, a barbarous nation of Caribes Indians,of the Nuevo Reino de Granada, dwellingimmediately upon the mountains and forests ofFosca. They are ferocious and cruel, and pitchtheir huts near the river Bermejo. But little isknown of their customs and of their country.

CHORAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huamalies in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Jesus.

CHOROMA, a settlement of the province andcorrregimiento of Chichas and Tarija, in the dis-trict of the former, and annexed to the curacy ofTupisa.

CHOROMOROS, a barbarous nation of Indians of Peru, who formerly occupied the plainsor llanuras of Calchaqui towards the ??. ; touchingtoAvards the e. upon the source of the river Mogo-les, and extending n. as far as the mountains ofthe Lules, and w. as far as the Andes. They areat present reduced to the Catholic religion, and aremixed with those of other nations ; but some fewof them still persist in their idolatry, and livedispersed upon the mountains.

CHORONI, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, in the province and governmentof Venezuela, between the mountain of Ocumaraand the port of Chuapo.

CHOROS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile. It has the hard lot of being scantily sup-plied Avith Avater, even as much as is necessary lordrinking.

Same name, a point of the coast of this provinceand kingdom (Chile).

Same name, an island near the coast and point ofits name (Choros),

CHORRERA, a settlement of the jurisdictionand akaldia mayor of Nata in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate near the coast of the S.sea.

Same name, a creek of the island of Cuba, onthe 71. coast, having a fort for its protection, witha detacliment of troops from the Havana.

CHORILLO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru.

Same name, another (settlement), in the province and corregimento of Cercado in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Surco.

CHORRILLOS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cañete in Peru; situate onthe coast, close to the point of China.

CHORROS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdom of Quito.

CHORROU, Chike du, a rivulet and establishmentof the French, in their possessions inGuayana.

CHORUNGA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Condesuyos de Arequipa in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Andaray ; situate in thevalley of its name.

CHOSAPACK, a large andbeautiful bay on the coast of the province and colony of Virginia]]. [See Chesapeak.]

CHOSCHAMA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Huacaiia.

[CHOSCUMUS, a fort of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres, near a small lakeabout 20 leagues s. e. of Buenos Ayres, in Lat. 35°33' 40^. Long. 38° 2' 15" 20 .]

CHOTA, Todos Santos de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxamarca inPeru.

[Chota, a valley of the Andes, which, thoughonly two miles Avide, is nearly a mile in depth.It Avas passed by Humboldt and his companions,in 1801, on tlreir way to Quito, Avhen they foundits temperature to be intensely sultry.]

3 N

Last edit almost 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
463

C H U

[And the Import of Slaves, by report of privycouncil, 1788, at a medium of four years, andby a return to house of commons in 1805, at amedium of two years from 1803, was as follows :

Average of

Imports.

Re-exports.

Retained.

Four years to 1787

658

102

556

Tw o years to 1803

971

124

847

By report of privy council, 1788, and by subse-quent estimate, the population amounted to

Years.

Whites.

People of

Slaves.

Colour.

1787

1912

1908

20,435

1805

1800

198

26,000

See Caribe (Leeward) Islands; and for thelater political inquiries, see West Indies.]

Same name, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district and alcaldia mayor ofToluca in Nueva Espana. It contains 64 familiesof Indians, and lies a small distance to the n. of itscapital.

Same name, another, of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in the samekingdom, lying two leagues from its capital.

Same name, another, of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tetelaxonotla in thesame kingdom, lying two leagues to the w. of thatplace.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimienio of Angaraes in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of San Antonio, and situate on the contraryside of the river.

Same name another, settlement of the province andeorreghniento of Conchucos in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of San Marcos.

Same name, another settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of its capital.

Same name, another settlement of the head settlement of Pinotepa, and alcaldia mayor of Xicayan,in Nueva Espana. It contains 24 families ofIndians, and is seven leagues to the n. of its headsettlement.

Same name, another settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cuquio in the samekingdom ; situate near to the conflux of the riversMesquital and Grande, its population is large.

C H U 46S

and it lies 15 leagues to the w. of its capital, an^10 to the n. w. of the capital of the province ofGuadalaxara.

Same name, another settlement of the head settle-ment of Axixique, and alcaldia mayor of Zayula,in the same kingdom ; situate on the shore of thegreat lake or sea of Chapala. It contains 70 faj-milies of Indians, who employ themselves in fish-ing and agriculture ; is 13 leagues to the s. of itshead settlement.

Same name another settlement of the provinceand country of the Amazonas, in the PortugueseK ossessioiis ; situate on the shore of the riverlaranon, at the mouth where it enters the Ovari-pana.

Same name another settlement of the provinceand government of Cartagena in the district ofSinu ; situate on the bank of the river Pichelin, inthe division of this jurisdiction and that of Tolu.It is one of those which were founded, in 1776, bythe Governor Don Juan Piraienta.

Same name another settlement of the kingdom ofBrazil ; situate on the shore of a river whichenters the Yguan to the s. of the settlement of JesusMaria.

Same name another settlement of the provinceand captainship of Sergipé in the same kingdom (Brazil) ;situate on the sea-coast, between the river Sirugipaand thatof Vazabaris.

Same name another settlement of the provinceand kingdom of Nueva Galicia ; situate near itscapital.

Same name,of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof the Jesuits in the province of Tepeguana, andkingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.

Same name another settlement of Nuevo Mexico ;situate on the shore of the Rio Grande del N.(Large River of tlie N.) where this enters the Con-ch os.

Same name, a bay on the coast of theprovince of California, in the part opposite thecoast of Nueva Espana.

Same name another settlement, an isle of the N. sea, in theinterior of the bay and port of the Cul de Sac Grand,of the island of Guadalupe.

[CHRISTOPHER, Sr. See Christovae.]CHUAO, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, in the province and governmentof Venezuela, to the w. of the port of La Guaira.

==CHUAPA, a settlement and head settlement ofthe alcaldia mayor of Villalta in Nueva Espana.It contains 112 familes of Indians, and is 12 leaguesn. e. of its capital.

Same name, a river of the kingdom of Chile.

2

Last edit almost 2 years ago by LLILAS Benson
519

COR

seasons, and is flooded by waters rushing downthrough a neighbouring channel, and in factAvould be hereby rendered iinitdiabitable, but forthe mounds Avhich have been raised for its defence.One half of the city experiences in one day a va-riation of all the winds from n. to s. These winds,thus changing, are accompanied with great tem-pests of thunder and lightning. At one momentthe heat which accompanies the n. wind is ex-cessive, and at another the cold which accompaniesthe s. is intolerable. It is, indeed, to this causethat the number of sudden deaths which occurhere are attributed. The city is small, and nearlyof a square figure, but the buildings are superiorto any in the province. It has three convents ;those of the religious order of St. Francis, St. Do-mingo, and La Merced, an hospital of Bethleraites,with the dedicatory title of San Roque ; two mo-nasteries of nuns, tlie one of Santa Teresa, the otherof Santa Clara, and two colleges with the titles ofuniversities, it is the head of a bishopric, erectedin 1570, and is very rich, owing to the great com-merce which it carries on in mules bought in theprovince of Buenos Ayres, and fattened in thepastures here, for the purpose of being sold for thesupply of the other provinces, and in fact of thewhole of Peru. It abounds in all kinds of pro-ductions, and is 70 leagues from Santiago del Es-tero, to the s. in 62° 39'; long. 31° 20' s. lat. (Foran account of the late revolutions of this place,see La Plata.)

Cordova, another city, in the province andgovernment of Cumaná, founded by Gonzalo deOcampo in 1525, near the sea-coast. It is so re-duced and poor, that it does not deserve the nameof a city. It is bounded by the Caribes Indians.

Cordova, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Castro Vireyna in Peru.

Cordova, another, of the province and go-vernment of Santa Marta in the kingdom of Ti-erra Firme, situate upon the coast. It was sackedby the English pirate Gauson in 1625.

CORDOVES, Rio Del, a river of the provinceand government of Buenos Ayres. It runs zo. andenters the Yazigua close to the pass of Chileno.

CORE, Bank of, an isle of the N. Sea, nearthe coast of S. Carolina, between those of Oca-cook and Drum.

(Core Sound, on the coast of N. Carolina,lies s. of, and communicates with Pamlico.)

COREBO, a river of the province and govern-ment of Chocó. It rises in the valley of 'I'atave,at the foot of the mountains of Choco, and entersthe Paganagandi.

CORENA, a port on the coast of the province

COR 51^

and captainship of the Rio Janeiro in Brazil, closeto the island of Santa Maria.

CORENTE, a river of the kingdom of Brazil.It rises in the head of that of the Paraguas and theVerde, runs s, s.e. and enters the above river atmid-course.

CORENTIN, a river of the province and co-lony of Surinam, or part of Guayana in the Dutchpossessions, according to the last advices ot theFather Bernardo Rosclla of the extinguished so-ciety, Avhich advices were received from theDutch, and served, in 1745, to the making the mapof this province and the Orinoco. It rises in then. part of the famed lake Parime, which some havethought to exist merely in fable. It runs s. wa-teringtlie Dutch colonies; and five leaguesto the w.of Berbice, and to the s. e. of the Orinoco, emptiesitself into the sea, in 5° 22' n. lat. : at its entranceit is one league wide. The English call it Devil’screek, which signifies Barranco del Diablo. Inthe interior of its course it has some sand-banks,which extend for three leagues, and render its na-vigation difficult, notwithstanding that at the lowtide there arc still some channels of water. In thisriver are likewise three small well cultivated islands,lying in a direction from n. tov. They are veryfertile, and covered with trees, and the soundingsof the river about them varies from five to sixfathoms.

CORETIQUI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarquilla in Peru.

CORIANA. See Coro.

CORIDON, Salinas de, salt grounds in thepoint and zo. head of the island of St. Domingo,on the shore of the port Pimiento.

CORIMPO, a settlement of the province ofCinaloa in Nueva Espaiia ; situate on the shore ofthe river Mayo, between the settlements of Heco-joa and Nabajoa.

(CORINTH, a township in Orange county,Vermont, z€. of Bradford, containing 578 inha-bitants.)

CORIO, a settlement of the province and cap-tainship of San Vincente in Brazil, on the shoreand at tlie source of the river Uruguay.

CORIPATA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of Atabillos Altos.

CORIPI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Guayana, iii the French possessions. Itenters the sea between the Oiapoco and capeOrange.

CORIS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento oi Huailas in Peru, annexed to the cu-racy of Aija.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
522

522

COR

COROICO, a settlement of the province andeorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; situate on theshore of the river of its name, where there is aport for small vessels. This river rises in the cor-dillera of Ancuma, to the s. of the settlement ofPalca, and to the e. of the city of La Paz. It runsin a very rapid course to the e. and forming acurve turns n. and enters the w. side of the Beni,in lat. 16° 50' s.

COROMA, a settlement of the province andeorregimiento of Porco in Peru.

COROMANDIERES, some small islands ofthe N. sea, near the coast of Acadia inN. America,near the coast of Scatari. They are also calledDel Infierno, or Devil’s isles.

COROMOTO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on theshore of the river Guanarito, to the s. of the townof Guanaro.

CORON, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Huanoquite.

CORONA-REAL, a city of the province ofGuayana, and government of Curaana, foundedon the shores of the river Orinoco in 1759, by theRear-Admiral Don Joseph de Iturriaga, for whichpurpose he assembled together some wanderingpeople of the provinces of Caracas and Barcelona.At present, however, it is as it were desert andabandoned, since its inhabitants have returned totheir former savage state of life, having been con-stantly pursued and harassed by the CharibesIndians, against whom they could no longer main-tain their ground, after that the king’s garrisonhad been withdrawn, and since, owing to the dis-tance at which they were situate from the capital,it was in vain for them to look for any succourfrom that quarter.

Corona-Real, a large bay in the lake of Ma-racaibo, on thew. side.

Corona-Real, a rocky isle, or ridge of rocks,close to the n. coast of the island of Guadalupe,between cape St. Juan and the port or bay of Mole.

CORONADOS, a small island of the gulf ofCalifornia, or Mar Roxo de Cortes ; situate verynear the island of Carmen, on its n. e. side, whichlooks to the coast of New Spain.

(CORONDA, a town of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a riverforming the island of Santa Fe, about five leaguess. w. of that town, in Lat. 31° 58' 47". Long. 61°2' a).)

CORONANGO, Santa Maria de, a headsettlement of the alcaldia maj/or of Cholula inNueva Espafia. It contains 94 families of In-

C O R

dians, and to its district belong nine other settle-ments. It lies one league to the n. of its capital.

CORONEL, Puerto del, a port on the coastof the province and corregimiento of Quillota, andkingdom of Chile, between the port of Longotoraaand the river Quilimari.

CORONEL, a river of the province and govern-ment of Venezuela. It rises to the ^ . of the city ofNirua, and afterwards unites itself with the Grape,to enter the Tinaco.

CORONEL, a point of the coast of the kingdomof Chile, in the province and corregimiento of Quil-lota, between the mouth of the river Biobio and theheights of Villagran.

CORONGO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Conchucos in Peru.

COROPA, a spacious country of the provinceand government of Guayana, which extends itselfbetween the river Coropatuba to the s. w. the Ma-ranon to the s. the Avari to the e. the mountainsof Oyacop of the Charibes Indians to the n. andthe mountains of Dorado or Manoa to the n.w.The whole of its territory is, as it were, unknown.The Portuguese possess the shores of the Maranonand the sea-coast as far as the bay of Vicente Pin-zon ; the Dutch of the colony of Surinam, by theriver Esequevo or Esquivo, called also Rupununi,have penetrated as far as the Maranon, by the riverParanapitinga. The mountains, which some haverepresented as being full of gold, silver, and pre-cious stones, sparkling in the rays of the sun, aremerely fables, which, at the beginning of the con-quests, deceived many who had gone in search ofthese rich treasures, and fell a sacrifice to thefatigues and labours which they experienced inthese dry and mountainous countries. The Por-tuguese have constructed here two forts, called Paruand Macapa. Mr. De la Martiniere, with hisusual want of accuracy, says that the Portuguesehave a settlement called Coropa, at the mouth ofthe river Coropatuba, where it enters the Maranon ;the Coropatuba joins the Maranon on the n. side,in the country of Coropa, and at the settlement ofthis name ; this settlement being nothing more thana small fort, and lying in the province of Topayos,on the s. shore of the Maranon, and being knownby the name ofCurupa, in the chart published in1744, and in that of the Father Juan Magnin, in1749.

COROPATUBA. See Curupatuba.

COROPUNA, a desert of the province ofCuzco in Peru, between the provinces of Parina-cocha and Canas or Aruni. It extends more than12 leagues s. to n. and is troublesome and dan-gerous to traverse.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kmr3934
541

541

CUBA.

cliurclies for divilie worship, was exported, in 1776,to the quantity of 12,550 arrobas, from a singleport of the Havana ; and all of it of as good aquality as is the wax of Venice. Although thecapital of this island is the city of its name, theHavana is, at the present day, looked upon as theprincipal. Here the governor and captain-generalof the kingdom resides ; and it has gained thispreference from the excellence of its port, and fromother qualifications, which will be found treated ofunder that article. We must here confine our-selves to what we have already said, a more diffuseaccount not corresponding to our plan, though,and if all were said of which the subjectwould admit, a very extensive history might bemade. The population consists of tiie followingcities, towns, and places.

Cilies. Las Piedras,

Havana, . Cubita,

Cuba, Vertientes,

Earacoa, San Pedro,

Holguin, Pamarejo,

Matanzas, Cupey,

Trinidad, Arroyo de Arenas,

Santa Maria del Rosario, Pilipinas,

San Juan de Taruco, .liguam,

Compostela. Caney,

Towns. Tiguabos,

Bayamo, El Prado,

Puerto del Principe, Moron,

S. Felipe and Santiago,

S. J uan de los Remedies, El Cano,

Santi Espiritus, Managua,

Santa Clara, Guines,

G uanavacoa, Rio Elanco,

Guamutas,

Settlements. Alvarez,

Consolacion, Planavana

Los Pinos,

Baxa,

Mantua,

Guacamaro,

Las Tuscas,

Y ara,

[Cuba, which, in 1774, contained only 371,628inhabitants, including 44,328 slaves, and from 5 to6000 free Negroes, possessed, in 1804, a popula-tion of 432,000 souls. The same island, in 1792,exported only 400,000 quintals of sugar ; but, in1804, its annual exportation of that article hadrisen to 1,000,000 of quintals. By a statement ofthe export of sugar from the Havana, from 1801 to1810 inclusive, it appears that the average for thelast 10 years has been 2,850,000 arrohas, or about644,000 cwt. a year. Notwithstanding this, Cuba

San Miguel,

Santiago de las Vegas.

Macuriges,

Guanajay,

El Ciego,Cacarajicaras,Pinal del Rio.

requires annual remittances from Mexico. Thenumber of Negroes introduced into Cuba, from1789 to 1803, exceeded 76,000 souls ; and duringthe last four years of that period, they amounted to34,500, or to more than 8600 annually. Accord-ingly, the population of the island, in 1804, con-sisted of 108,000 slaves, and 324,000 free persons,of whom 234,000 were whites, and 90,000 freeblacks and people of colour. The white popula-tion of Cuba forms therefore or .54 of thewhole number of its inhabitants. In Caracas, thewhites constitute .20 of the total population ; inNew Spain almost .19; in Peru .12; and in Ja-maica .10.

In speaking of the origin, manners, and customs,&c. of the natives of Cuba, we are to be understoodas giving also an account of those of Hispaniola,Jamaica, and Puerto Rico; for there is no doubtthat the inliabitants of all those islands were of onecommon origin ; speaking the same language, pos-sessing the same institutions, and practising similarsuperstitions. The fairest calculation as to theirnumbers, when first discovered, is 3,000,000. But,not to anticipate observations that will more pro-perly appear hereafter, we shall now proceed to theconsideration, -- 1. Of their persons and per sonalendowments.— 2. Their intellectual faculties anddispositions.— 3. Their political institutions.—4. Their religious riles. — 5. Their arts.

1. iYrsows. — Both men and women wore no-thing more than a slight covering of cotton clothround the waist; but in the women it extendedto the knees : the children of both sexes appearedentirely naked. In stature they were taller, butless robust than the Caribes. Their colour wasa clear brown, not deeper in general, accordingto Columbus, than that of a Spanish peasant whohas been much exposed to the wind and the sun.Like the Caribes, they altered the natural con-figuration of the head in infancy ; but after a dif-ferent mode (the sinciput, or fore-part of the headfrom the eye-brows to the coronal suture, was de-pressed, which gave an unnatural thickness andelevation to the occiput, or hinder part of the skull);and by this practice, says Herrera, the crown wasso srengthened that a Spanish broad-sword, insteadof cleaving the skull at a stroke, would frequentlybreak short upon it ; an illustration which gives anadmirable idea of the clemency of their conquer-ors ! Their liair was uniformly, black, withoutany tendency to curl ; their features were hardand unsightly ; the face broad, and the nose flat;but their eyes streamed with good nature, and al-together there was something pleasing and invitingin the countenances of most of them, which pro-]

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
542

b¥Z

CUBA.

[claimed a frank and gentle disposition. It was anhonest face, (says Martyr), coarse, but not gloomy ;for it was enlivened by confidence, and softened bycompassion. Amongst our islanders, an attach-ment to the sex was remarkably conspicuous.Love, with this happy people, was not a transientand youthful ardour only ; but the source of alltheir pleasures, and the chief business of life : fornot being, like the Caribes, opjjressed by theweight of perpetual solicitude, and tormented byan unquenchable thirst of revenge, they gave fullindulgence to the instincts of nature, while the in-fluence of the climate heightened the sensibility ofthe passions. See Oviedo, lib.v. c.S. ' WeLave nearly the same account at this day of theArrowauks of Guayana. “ In their natural dis-position (says Bancroft) they are amorous andwanton and Barrere observes, “ ils sont Intri-gues au supreme degreZ' It is related by Herrera,that a deity similar to the Venus of antiquity,was one of the divinities of the Tlascalans, apeople of Mexico. In truth, an excessive sen-suality was among the greatest defects in theircharacter : and to this cause alone is imputed, bysome writers, the origin of that dreadful disease,witli the infliction of which they have almost re-venged the calamities brought upon them by theavarice of Europe; if indeed the venereal contagionwas first introduced into Spain from these islands;a conclusion to which, notwithstanding all thatLas been written in support of it, an attentive in-quirer will still hesitate to subscribe. Their agi-lity was eminently conspicuous in their dances,wherein they delighted and excelled, devoting thecool hours of night to this employment. “ It wastheir custom (says Herrera) to dance from eveningto the dawn ; and although 50,000 men and wo-men were frequently assembled together on theseoccasions, they seemed actuated by one commonimpulse, keeping time by responsive motions oftheir hands, feet, and bodies, with an exactnessthat was wondertul. These public dances (for theyhad others highly licentious) were appropriated toparticular solemnities, and being accompanied withhistorical songs, were called arietoes ; a singularfeature in their political institutions, of which weshall presently speak. Besides the exercise ofdancing, another diversion was prevalent amongthem, which they called bato; and it appears fromthe account given of it by the Spanish historians,that it had a distant resemblance to the Englishgame of cricket ; for the players were divided intotwo parties, Avhich alternately changed places, andthe sport consisted in dexterously throwing and re-turning an elastic ball from one parly to the other.

It was not however caught in the hand, or re«turned with an instrument, but received on thehead, the elbow, or the foot ; and the dexterityand force with which it Avas thence repelled, Avereastonishing and inimitable. Such exertions belongnot to a people incurably enervated and slothful.

2. Intellects. — The benevolence of these In-dians, unexampled in the history of civilized na-tions, was soon basely requited by the conduct of aband of robbers, whom Columbus unfortunatelyleft in the island, on his departure for Europe.When any of the Spaniards came near to a village,the most ancient and venerable of the Indians, orthe cacique himself, if present, came out to meetthem, and gently conducted them into their habi-tations, and seated them on stools of ebony curi-ously ornamented. These benches seem to havebeen seats of honour reserved for their guests ; forthe Indians threw themselves on the ground, andkissing the hands and feet of the Spaniards, of-fered them fruits and the choicest of their viands ;entreating them to prolong their stay, with suchsolicitude and reverence as demonstrated that theyconsidered them as beings of a superior nature,whose presence consecrated their dAvellings, andbrought a blessing with it. The reception whichBartholomew Columbus, who was appointed lieu-tenant, or deputy -governor, in the absence of theadmiral, afterAvards met with, in his progressthrough the island to levy tributes from the severalcaciques or princes, manifested not only kindnessand submission, but on many occasions munifi-cence, and even a high degree of politeness. Thesecaciques had all heard of the Avonderful eagernessof the strangers for gold ; and such of them aspossessed any of this precious xnetal, willinglypresented all that they had to the deputy-governor.Others, Avho had not the means of obtaining gold,brought provisions and cotton in great abundance.Among the latter Avas Behechio, a powerful ca-cique, Avho invited the lieutenant and his attend-ants to his dominions ; and tlie entertainmentwhich they received from this hospitable chief isthus described by Martyr. “ As they approachedthe king’s dwelling, they Avere met by his Avives,to the number of SO, carrying branches of thepalm-tree in their hands, who first sainted theSpaniards Avitli a solemn dance, accompanied Avitha general song. These matrons Avere succeeded bya train of virgins, distinguished as such by theirappearance; the former Avearing aprons of cottondoth, Avhile the latter Avere arrayed only in the in-nocence of pure nature. Their hair was tiedsimply Avith a fillet over their foreheads, or suf-fered to floAV gracefully on their shoulders and bo-]

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
543

CUBA.

643

[■soms. Their limbs were finely proportioned, andtheir complexions, though brown, were smooth,shining, and lovely. Tlic Spaniards were struckwith admiration, believing that they beheld thedryads of the woods, and the nymphs of the foun-tains, realizing ancient fable. The branches whichthey bore in their hands, they now delivered ivithlowly obeisance to the lieutenant, who, enteringthe palace, found a plentiful, and, according tothe Indian mode of living, a splendid repast al-ready provided. As niglA approached, the Spa-niards were conducted to separate cottages, whereineach of them was accommodated with a cottonhammoc ; and the next morning they were againentertained with dancing and singing. This wasfollowedliy matches of w restling, and running forprizes ; after which two great bodies of armed In-dians unexpectedly appeared, and a mock engage-ment ensued ; exhibiting their modes of attack anddefence in their wars with the Caribes. Forthree days were the Spaniards thus royally enter-tained, and on the fourth the affectionate Indiansregretted their departure.”

3. Political institutions . — Their kings, as we haveseen, were called caciques and their power washereditary. But there were also subordinatechieftains, or princes, who were tributaries to thesoverei<rn of each district. Thus the territory in11 ispaniola, anciently called Xaraguay, extendingfrom the plain of Leogane to the westernmost part ofthe island, was the kingdom of the cfle^ 5 '^/e Behechio;but it appears from Martyr, that no less than 32inferior chieftains or nobles had jurisdiction withinthat space of country, who were accountable to thesupreme authority of Behechio, They seem tohave somewhat resembled the ancient barons orfeudatories of Europe : holding their possessionsby the tenure of service. Oviedo relates, that theywere under the obligation of personally attendingthe sovereign, both in peace and Avar, whenevercommanded so to do. The whole island of His-paniola was divided into five great kingdoms.The islands of Cuba and Jamaica rvere divided,like Hispaniola, into many principalities or king-doms ; but we are told that the Avhole extent ofPuerto Rico was subject to one cacique onljr. Ithas been remarked, that the dignity of these chief-tians was hercditaiy ; but if Martyr is to becredited, the laAv of succession among them wasdifferent from that of all other people ; for he ob-serves, that the caciques bequeathed the supremeauthority to the children of their sisters, accordingto seniority, disinheriting their owm offspring ;“ being certain,” adds Martyr, “ that, by thispolicy, they preferred the blood royal ; which

might not happen to be the case in advancing anyof the children of their numerous wives.” Therelation of Oviedo is somewhat different, and seemsmore probable : he remarks, that one of tlie wivesof each cacique was particularly distinguishedabove the rest, and appears to have been consideredby the people at large as the reigning queen ; thatthe children of this lady, according to priority ofbirth, succeeded to the father’s honours; but, indefault of issue by the favourite princess, the sistersof the cacique, if there were no surviving brothers,took place of the cacique’s own children by hisother wives. The principal cacique was distin-guished by regal ornaments and numerous attend-ants. In travelling through his dominions, he wascommonly borne on men’s shoulders, after a man-ner very much resembling the use of the palanquinin the E. Indies. According to Martyr, he wasregarded by all his subjects with such reverence,as even exceeded the bounds of nature and reason ;for if he ordered any of them to east themselvesheadlong from a high rock, or to drown themselvesin the sea, alleging no cause but his sovereignpleasure, he was obeyed without a murmur ; op-position to the supreme authority being consi-dered not only as unavailing, but impious. Nordid their veneration terminate with the life of theprince ; it was extended to his memory afterdeath; a proof that his authority, however extra-vagant, was seldom abused. When a caciquedied, his body was cmbowelled, and dried in anoven moderately heated ; so that the bones andeven the skin Avere preserved entire. The corpseW'as then placed in a cave with those of his ances-tors, this being (observes Oviedo) among thesesimple people the only system of heraldry ; Avhere-by they intended to render, not the name alone,but the persons also, of their worthies immortal.If a cacique Avas slain in battle, and the bodycould not be recovered, they composed songs inhis praise, Avhich they taught their children. Itis related by Martyr, that on the death of a cacique,the most beloved of his wives Avas immolated at hisfuneral. Thus he observes that Anacaona, on thedeath of her brother. King Behechio, ordered a verybeautiful Avoraan, Avhose name Avas GuanahataBenechina, to be buried alive in the cave Avlicrehis body (after being dried as above mentioned)Avas deposited. But Oviedo, though by no meanspartial towards the Indian character, denies thatthis custom Avas general among them. Anacaona,Avho had been married to a Caribe, probablyadopted the practice from the account she had re-ceived from her husband of his national customs;and it is not impossible, under a female adrninis-]

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
544

544

CUBA.

[tration, (among savages), but that the extraordi-nary beauty of the unfortunate victim contributedto her destruction. These heroic effusions con-stituted a branch of solemnities, called arietoes ;consisting of hymns and public dances, accom-panied with musical instruments made of shells,and a sort of drum, the sound of which was heardat a vast distance. It is pretended that among thetraditions publicly recited, there was one of a pro-phetic nature, denouncing ruin and desolation bythe arrival of strangers completely clad, and armedwith the lightning of heaven.

6. Religious rites. — Like all other unenlightenednations, these poor Indians were indeed the slavesof superstition. Their general theology (for theyhad an established system, and a priesthood tosupport it), was a medley of gross folly and childishtraditions, the progeny of ignorance and terror.Historians have preserved a remarkable speech ofa venerable old man, a native of Cuba, who, ap-proaching Christopher Columbus with great reve-rence, and presenting a basket of fruit, addressedhim as follows. “ Whether you are divinities,”observed he, or mortal men, we know not. Y ouare come into these countries with a force, againstwhich, were we inclined to resist it, resistancewould be folly. We are all therefore at yourmercy ; but if you are men, subject to mortalitylike ourselves, you cannot be unapprised, that afterthis life there is another, wherein a very differentportion is allotted to good and bad men. If there-fore you expect to die, and believe with us, thatevery one is to be rewarded in a future state, ac-cording to his conduct in the present, you will do nohurt to those who do none to you.” This remark-able circumstance happened on the 7th of July1494, and is attested by Pet. Martyr, Dccad. i. lib.iii. and by Herrera, lib. ii. c. 14. If it be askedhow Columbus understood the cacique, the answeris, that he had carried with him to Spain, in hisformer voyage, several of the Indians ; one ofwhom, a native of Guanahani, who had remainedwith him from October 1492, had acquired the.Spanish language. This man, whose name wasDidacus, served him, on this and other occasions,both as a guide and interpreter. Their notions offuture happiness seem however to have been nar-row and sensual. They supposed that the spiritsof good men were conveyed to a pleasant valley,which they called coycha ; a place of indolenttranquillity, abounding with delicious fruits, coolshades, and murmuring rivulets ; in a countrywhere drought never rages, and the hurricane isnever felt. In this si at of bliss (the Elysium ofantiquity), they believed that their greatest enjoy-

ment would arise from the company of their de-parted ancestors, and those persons w'ho weredear to them in life. Although, like the Caribes,our islanders acknowledged a plurality of gods,like them too they believed in the existence of onesupreme, invisible, immortal, and omnipotentCreator, whom they named Jocahuna. But un-happily, with these important truths, these poorpeople blended the most puerile and extravagantfancies, which were neither founded in rationalpiety, nor productive of moral obligation. Theyassigned to the supreme Being a father and mo-ther, whom they distinguished by a variety ofnames, and they supposed the sun and moon to bethe chief seats of their residence. Their system ofidol-worship was, at the same time, more lament-able than even tliat of the Caribes ; tor it wouldseem that they paid divine honours to stocks andstones converted into images, which they calledzemi ; not regarding these idols as symbolical re-presentations only of their subordinate divinities,and useful as sensible objects, to awaken the me-mory and animate devotion, but ascribing divinityto the material itself, and actually worshippingthe rude stone or block which their own hands hadfashioned. Their idols were universally hideousand frightful, sometimes respresenting toads andother odious reptiles ; but more frequently the hu-man face horribly distorted ; a proof that they con-sidered them, not as benevolent, but evil powers ;as objects of terror, not of admiration and love.To keep alive this sacred and awful prejudice inthe minds of the multitude, and heighten its in-fluence, their bohitos or priests appropriated aconsecrated house in each village, wherein the zemiwas invoked and worshipped. Nor was it per-mitted to the people at large, at all times to enter,and on unimportant occasions approach the dreadobject of their adoration. The bohitos undertookto be their messengers and interpreters, and by theefficacy of their prayers to avert the dangers whichthey dreaded. The ceremonies exhibited on thesesolemnities were well calculated to extend thepriestly dominion, and confirm the popular sub-jection. In the same view, the bohitos added totheir holy profession the practice of physic, andthey claimed likewise the privilege of educatingthe children of the first rank of people ; a combi-nation of influence which, extending to the nearestand dearest concerns both of this life- and the next,rendered their authority irresistible. Religion washere made the instrument of civil despotism, andthe will of the cacique, if confirmed by the priest,was impiously pronounced the decree of heaven.Columbus relates, that some of his people enteringj

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
558

55S

CUM

CUM

found in the environs of Cumana what the Spa-niards call til spa, a species of the Jesuits’ bark ;the calaguala, a plant, the root of which isdissolvent, aperitive, and sudorific ; the pissi-phii, a species of emetic ; the caranapire, a speciesof sage ; and the tualua, a more powerful purga-tive than jalap. There arc also a great number ofspices, which are suffered to rot on the spot where 'first they grew. In lat. 10° 27'. Long. 64° IS'.]The settlements of the province of Cumana are,

San Baltasar de los Cum pa,

Arias, Rio Caribes,

San Felipe de Austria, A raja.

Those of the missions,

Cocuisas, San Francisco,

San Feliz, Santa Maria de los An-

San Lorenzo, geles,

Chacaracuan, San Antonio.

Of the doctrines {dodrinas),

Cacuar,

Unare,

Punccres,

Guanaguana,

Soro,

Caicara,

Irapa,

Yaguara,

Caripe,

Teresen,

Guayuta,

Tipirin,

Amacuro,

Paro.

Cumana, a river of the above province (Cumaná) andgovernment, which rises in the spot called Co-coyan, in the serrama. It runs n. following thiscourse continually through the sierra until itflows down to the plain near the city, from whenceit enters the gulf, first having divided itself intofour arms. In the winter time it generally over-flows ; but as the distance from the sierra to itsmouth, or where it enters the sea, is so short, itquickly subsides within its proper bed, when itleaves water enough for the navigation of a barge ;and there w ould be sufficient for large vessels, wereit not for the bar which is at its mouth and im-pedes its entrance. In the summer time, how-ever, it becomes so dry, tliat it is scarcely navi-gable for canoes.

CUMANACOA, a city lying s. e. of Cumana14 leagues ; in the middle of the valley of the samename. The population amounts to 4200 people ;the air is wholesome, the w aters have a diureticqua-lity not commonly to be met with. This city wantsnothing but hands to avail itself of the produc-tions which the richness of the land would yield,if it were cultivated. The fruits have here an un-eommonly fine savour, taste, and substance. Thegovernment gives this city the name of San Bal-tasar de los Arias, but that of Cumanacoa has somuch prevailed, that it is the only one by whichit is now known. See Cumana.

2

CUMANAGOTA, a city of the former pro-vince and government ((Cumaná), in the kingdom of TierraFirme, called also San Baltasar de los Arias. Ithas a good, convenient, and secure port ; issituate on the skirts of the most elevated part ofthe serrama, in a fertile valley, which abounds instreams, which irrigate 26 estates of yucales, somesmall plantations of cacao, and some cattle. Theproductions of all these estates are consumed in thecountry ; since, through the unevenness of theroads, it is impossible to carry^them out of it, withthe exception, however, of tobacco, with whichCumana is supplied. The soil is the most fertileof any in the province, especially to the n. of thesietTa, where there might be established some verygood cacao estates ; but this is not to be accom-plished, considering the scarcity of its inhabitants,and their great poverty. This city, just after the con-quest of these countries, was noted for its famouspearl-fisheries, which were afterwards abandoned.Its vicinity was inhabited by many gentile Indians,who were at continual enmity with the Spaniardsand the other inhabitants ; but these troublesomepeople were reduced to obedience by Don Juan deUrpin, who had held consultations for that pur-pose with the council of the Indies. The popu-lation amounts to 800 souls, including the Negroslaves and the people of colour.

CUMAPI, a large lake of the country of LasAmazonas. It is a waste water of the large riverCaqueta, in the territory of the Guayonas In-dians.

CUMARA, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the territory possessed bythe Portuguese, is an arm of the Cuchivara orPurus, which enters the Maranon before the otherstreams which are tributary to this river.

CUMAREBO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on the sea-coast, and at the point of its name, with a good,though small port, and one that is much frequentedby vessels.

CUMARU, Los Santos Angeles de, a settle-ment of the province and country of Las Amazonas,in the part possessed by the Portuguese; situateon the shore of a large river.

CUMATEN, a small river of the province andcolony of Surinam, or part of Guayana possessedby the Dutch. It rises in the mountain of Areyuc-tuquen, and runs, collecting the waters of manyothers, to enter the Cuyuni on the s. side.

CUMATl, a small river of the province andgovernment of Paraguay. It runs s. and entersthe large river of the Portuguese.

CUMAYARIS, a barbarous nation of Indians,

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
566

S66

CURCURIBISA, a river of the province and government of Quijos and Macas, in the district of *he second, and in the kingdom of Quito. It rises in the country of the Xibaros Indians, runs inclining to the s. e. and enters the Santiago. CURICO, San Joseph de, a town of the province and corregimiento of Maule in the kingdom of Chile ; situate on the shore of the river Huaico. It is small, and but thinly peopled, its inhabitants being for the most part composed of people of colour. [The metal of the mine lately discovered here has obtained the name of natural avanturine, from its being filled with brilliant particles that give it a beautiful appearance. This metal is used by the goldsmiths for rings, bracelets, and other ornaments of jewellery.] CURICURARI, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the part possessed by the Portuguese. It runs e. between the rivers Cicayuri and Yurubechi, and enters the Negro. CURIEPE, a settlement of the province and government of Venezuela ; situate on the coast, near the point or cape of Codera, on the shore of the river of its name. Curiepe. This river rises in the mountains near the coast, runs e. and enters the sea in the bay formed by the cape Codera.

CURIES, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yea in Peru ; annexed to one of the curacies of the Indians of its capital. CURIGUACURU, a river of Nueva Andalucia, Austral or Inferior, in the province of Guayana. It flows down from the mountains of the Caribes Indians to the n. and. running s. and increasing its waters by many other streams, enters the Maranon. CURIGUIMAR, a lake of the province and government of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia, on the shore of the river Orinoco, close to the town of Sanchez. CURIGUIRES, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the woods bordering upon the source of the river Cuchigaras, and bounded by the Indians of this name, as also by the Cumavaris. Some of these Indians are warlike, and of gigantic stature. CURIMON, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Aconcagua in the kingdom of Chile in the district of which is a convent of the religious recollects, or strict observers of the order of St. ■ Francis, bearing the title of Santa Rosa de Vfr terbo. CURINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who inhabit the s. part of the river Maranon. It is but little known, and all that is traced of them is, that they are in continual warfare with the Aguas ; so that their numbers are gradually diminishing. CURIPANA, a port of the coast of the N. sea, in the province and government of Cumana, to the s. of the city of Cariaco. CURIQUAXES, S. Francisco de los, a settlement of the province and government of Quixos and Macas in the kingdom of Quito. It belongs to the district of the former, and is one of those which compose the reduccion of the Sucurabos Indians, held at the charge of the regulars of the company of Jesuits. CURITI, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of the town of San Gil, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Guane. It is of a very wood temperature, pleasant and agreeable. Its natives, who should amount to 30 or 40 Indians, are docile, mild, and of good dispositions. CURITIMI see CorentinCURITUBA, a town of the province and captainship of Rey in Brazil ; situate near the coast. Curitcjba, a river, called also Yguazii, in the province and government of Paraguay. It runs w. collecting the waters of many other rivers, and enters with a large stream into the Parana. See Yguazu.

CURU, a river of the province and captainship of Seara in Brazil. It runs n. and enters the sea, between the coast of Los Humos and the point of Los Baxos or Arricifes. CURUA, a river of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil. It rises in the country of the Aritues Indians, runs to the n.n.e. and enters the river of Las Amazonas on the 5. side. CURUARI, a river of the kingdom of Brazil, in the territory of the Cayapos Indians. It rises in its mountains, runs s.s.e. and enters the n. side of the large river Parana. CURUAT, a small river of the province and government of Guayana. It runs nearly parallel with the river Caroni, collecting the waters of many others in its course, until it enters this river. CURUAU, an island of the N. sea ; situate at the mouth or entrance of the river of Las Amazonas, to the s. of the island of La Penitencia. CURUA-UASU, a village and settlement of the Portuguese, in the kingdom of Brazil ; situate on the shore of a small river which enters the Sono.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
568

568

c u s

CUT

the most pleasant situation that could be desired, in an inland country, upon a high swelling ridge of sand hills, within 3 or 400 yards of a large and beautiful lake, abounding with fish and fowl. The lake is terminated on one side by extensive forests, consisting of orange groves, overtopped with grand magnolias, palms, poplar, tilia, liveoaks, &c. ; on the other side by extensive green plains and meadows. The town consists of 30 habitations, each of which consists of two houses, nearly of the same size, large, and convenient, and covered close with the bark of the cypress tree. Each has a little garden spot, containing corn, beans, tobacco, and other vegetables. In the great Alachua savannah, about two miles distant, is an inclosed plantation, which is worked and tended by the whole community, yet every family has its particular part. Each family gathers and deposits in its granary its proper share, setting apart a small contribution for the public granary, which stands in the midst of the plantation.]

CUSE, a river of the kingdom of Peru. It rises in the mountains of the province of Moxos, and runs e. w. from the river and lake of Sara to the river Ubay. It follows its course to the n. and enters the last mentioned river. [CUSHAI, a small river which empties into Albemarle sound, between Chowan and the Roanoke, in N. Carolina.] [CUSHETUNK Mountains, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey.]

[CUSHING, a township in Lincoln county, district of Maine, separated from Warren and Thoraaston by St. George's river. It was incorporated in 1789, contains 942 inhabitants, and lies 216 miles w. by n. of Boston.] CUSHNOE, a waterfal of the river Kenebec, in the province of Sagadahoc, opposite fort Wertern. CUSI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yauyos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Pampas. CUSIANA, a settlement of the jurisdiction of Santiago de las Atalayas, and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Santiago. It is much reduced and very poor, of a hot temperature, and producing only maize, yucas, plantains, &c. Cusiana, a river of the same province (San Juan de los Llanos). It rises from a small lake near the settlement of Gameza, in the jurisdiction and corregimiento of Tunja, and there enters the Mcta.

CUSIBAMBA, a river of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru. It rises in the cordillera of the Andes, runs w. and en- e u t iers the Apurimac, opposite the settlement of Curaguasi. Cusibamba, a valley of this province.

CUSICAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who dwell to the e. of the nation of the Chiquitos, and to the n. of the settlement of San Juan Bautista de los Xamoros. All that is known of them is, that they are numerous and ferocious. CUSITAS, a settlement of Indians of the province and colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of the river Apalachicola. CUSMO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Santa in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Guarmey. [CUSSENS, a small river in Cumberland county, Maine, which runs a s. e. course to Casco bay, between the towns of Freeport and N. Yarmouth.] [CUSSEWAGA, a settlement in Pennsylvania.] CUSSIA, a settlement of the Salivas Indians, forming the greater part of this nation, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate near the river Sinaruco, in the llanuras or plains of the Orinoco. The Caribes destroyed and burnt it in 1684. CUSSIQUINA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which laves the territory of the Mayorunas Indians, who live upon its borders to the s. This river, after running many leagues to the n, e. enters the said territory, in lat. 3° 20' *.

[CUSSITAH, an Indian town in the w. part of Georgia, 12 miles above the Broken Arrow, on Chattahoosee river.] CUSTODIO, a river of the kingdom of Brazil. It runs n. n. w. is small, and enters the Tocantines, between that of San Elias and the river Preto or De la Palma. CUSUMPE, a small lake of the province of Hampshire; one of those of New England, between the rivers Pennycook and Pygwaket. CUTACO, a river in a narrow vale of the Andes, the bed of which was ascertained by Humboldt, in 1802, to be at the vast depth of 4200 feet. On its banks are many plantations of sugarcanes. CUTAGOCHI, a settlement of Cherokees Indians, in the province, and colony of S. Carolina ; situate at the source of the river Eu phase, where the English have a commercial establishment. CUTAWA, or Catawba, a river of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the Ohio ;. its waters are always full of coal.

CUTERUO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed to' the curacy of Huambos.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
Untitled Page 572

lake is as cold as snow itself, This province, like all the others of the kingdom which lie to the s. e. of the cordilfcra, is ever subject to terrible tempests of thunder and lightning, accompanied with boisterous winds and rains from October to March; the same not happening in the provinces which lie to the to. The Indians of this province are of a darker complexion than those of any other ; but they are also of loftier stature, better made, agile, and extremely addicted to the chase, in which they greatly excel, and more particularly in the taking of ostriches, which abound in the llanuras to \X\cs. ; and by all of these exercises they become so light and active as to be able to keep pace with a horse. These Indians are generally known here by the name of Guapes, and are descendants of the Pampas, their neighbours to the e. with whom they trade in the fruits of the country in exchange for clothes and other articles, money not being known amongst any of these barbarians. The Guapes are of a docile and generous disposition, but of great spirit, and very warlike, robust, and well formed. This country, considering its extent, is but thinly peopled, since its inhabitants amount to only 25,000 of all sexes and ages, according to the latest calculation. The capital is the city of Mendoza. [See Chile.] _ _

CUYO, a shoal formed by two rocks in the N. sea, near the coast of the province and government of Yucatan, close to the cape of Cotoche.

[ CUYOACAN, a settlement of the intendancy of Mexico, containing a convent of nuns founded by Hernan Cortes, in which, according to his testament, this great captain wished to be interred, " in whatever part of the world he should end his days." This clause of the testament was never fulfilled.] CUYOCUYO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of its capital. CUYOTAMBO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Quishuares. CUYOTEPEC, San Bartolome de, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Antequera, in the province and bishopric of Oaxaca in Nueva Espana. It is of a middle temperature, contains 358 families of Indians, and a convent of the religious order of St. Dominic. In its district are sown in abundance various kinds of seeds and American aloes, of which is made pulque: Four leagues s. of its capital. CUYUANA, an island of the province and country of Las Amazonas, in the territory of the Portuguese, formed by two arms of the river Cudiivara or Purus, which separate before they c u z enter the Maranon. It is large, and of an irregular square figure. CUYUM, or Cuyuni, a large river of the province of Guayana, and government of Cumana. Its origin is not known for certain ; but, from the accounts of the Caribes Indians, it is somewhere near the lake Parime, in the interior of the province, and to the n. e. of the said lake. It runs nearly due from n. to s. making several turnings, until it enters the Esquivo. By this river the Dutch merchants of this colony, assisted by the Caribes, go to entrap the Indians, to make them labour in the estates ; and they have built two forts on either side of the mouth of this river.

CUZABAMBA, a large settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lamas in Peru ; close to which passes a small river of the same name, and which afterwards unites itself with the river Moyobamba. Cuzabamba, another settlement in the province and corregimiento of Tacunga, of the kingdom of Quito.

CUZALAPA, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Ayotitlan, and alcaldia mayor of Amola, in Nueva Espana. Its population is very small, and its inhabitants employ themselves in the cultivation of seeds and breeding of cattle. Nine leagues to the w. of its head settle ment. CUZAMALA, a head settlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Azuchitlan in Nueva Espana, lying 10 leagues to the n. of its capital, and being divided from the same by two large rivers. It is of a hot and dry temperature ; its population is composed of 36 families of Spaniards, 30 of Mustees, 48 of Mulattoes, and 53 of Indians, who speak the Taracan language. The trade here consists in large cattle, in the cultivation of maize, and making cascalote. Some emolument also is derived from renting the lands belonging to the capital and the neighbouring settlements. CUZCATLAN, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of San Salvador in the kingdom of Guatemala. CUZCO, as it is called by the Indians, a city, the capital of a corregimiento in Peru, the head of a bishopric, erected in 1536, founded by the first Emperor of the Incas, Manco Capac, in 1043, who divided it into Hanam Cozco and Hurin Cozco, which signify Cuzco Lofty and Low, or Superior and Inferior ; the former towards the n. and the second towards the s. It is situate upon a rough and unequal plain formed by the skirts of various mountains, which are washed by

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
All 29 records