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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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THE GEOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL DICTIONARY OF AMERICA AND THE WEST INDIES.

[AARONSBURGH lies at the head of Penn's Creek, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania; about 30 miles W from Lewisbursrh, and 40 W by N from Sunbury. Lat. 40° 52' 30" N Long. 77° 31' 30" W.]

ABACACTIS, a settlement of Indians, of this name, in the province of the Amazonas, and in the part or territory possessed by the Portuguese. It is a reduccion of the religious order of the Carmelites of this nation, situate on the shores of a lake of the same name. It lies between this lake and a river, which is also so called, and which is a large arm of the Madeira, which, passing through this territory, afterwards returns to that from whence it flowed, forming the island of Topinambes.

[ABACO, one of the largest and most northern of the Bahama islands, situate upon the SE end of the Little Bahama bank. The Hole in the Rock, or (as it is most commonly called) the Hole in the Wall, is the most southern point of the island, and bears about 18 leagues north from the island of New Providence, about 9 or 10 leagues in a NW direction from Egg Island, and about 10 or 12 in a NW direction from the Berry Islands. About 10 leagues to the N of the Hole in the Wall, on the E side of the island, is Little Harbour, the entrance to which is between the main land of Abaco and Ledyard's Key, and within which there is good anchorage. There is also an anchorage to the W of the Hole in the Wall. The island of Abaco is at present uninhabited. In 1788 it contained about 50 settlers and 200 Negroes. The lands granted by the crown, previous to May 1803, amounted to 14,058 acres, for the purpose of cultivation; but the settlers who occupied it have since removed. It contains great quantities of the various kinds of woods which are common to almost all the Bahama islands.] To the northward of Abaco, is a long chain of small islands or keys, (including Elbow Key, Man of War Key, Great Guana Key, the Galapagos, &c. &c.) reaching, in a NW direction, almost to the Matanilla reefs on the Florida stream; from whence the Little Bahama bank extends, in a southerly direction, to the west point of the island of the Grand Bahama. [Lat. 26° 22' N Long. 77° 14' W See Bahamas.]

ABACOOCHE, a large river, rising in the SW territory, passing into Georgia, through the Cherokee into the Creek country, where it unites with the Oakfuskee, and forms the Alibama.]

ABACQUA, a settlement of the province and government of Buenos Ayres, situate on the shore of the river Paraná, near the spot where it enters the Paraguay, to the E of the city of Corrientes,

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are the ruins or some well made benches in the shape of couches, which have been much injured by time, and were there before the corning of the Spaniards. Lat. 13° 16' 30" s. Long. 74° 32' 30" w.

another settlement, of the same name in the province and corregimiento of Jauja, annexed to the curaey of Cochangara.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tarma.

ACOBIMBILLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Conaica.

ACOCHALA, a very lofty mountain of the province and corregimienento of Lipes, in the arch- bishopric of Charcas, where there are some very fine silver mines, which are, however, little worked for want of hands.

ACOLA , a settlement of the province and cor- regimiento of Lucanas in Peru, annexed to the curacy of its capital.

ACOLMAN, San Agustin de , a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez- coco, in Nueva Espana, situate in a pleasant valley of a benign temperature. There are some wards united to its district, and the number of its inhabitants, including these wards, amounts to 240 Indian families, besides a convent of monks of the order of St. Augustin.

ACOMA , a settlement of Nuevo Mexico, situ- ate on the shore of a river which enters the Grande of the N. between the settlements of San J uan and La Laguna. [It is on a high mountain, with a strong castle, and is the capital of the province. [Lat, 35° 24' «. Long. 106° 10'

ACOMACK , a county of the province and colony of Virginia, which preserves its Indian name. It is the largest county of the province, containing 200,925 acres of ground ; but not so well peopled as the others, and has only one parish, which is of the same name. Different rivers take their rise here ; among the most noted is the Clif>- sonossea,

ACOMAIO, a settlement of the province, and corregimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Santa Maria del Valle, situate on the confines of the infidel Panataguas Indians.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru.

ACOMARCA, a settlement of the province and corregimityito of Vilcas Huaman in Peru, arinexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

ACOMES, a fall of the river Amariscoggin, in the prov'ince of Continent, one of the four w hich compose the colony of New England.

ACOMULCO, a settlement of the head settle- ment and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan in Nueva Espana. It contains 12 Indian families, and is two leasrues to the w. of its capital.

ACONCAGUA, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Chile ; bounded n. by a part of the province of Quillota, e, by the Cordillera, s. by the valley of Colina, of the jurisdiction of Santiago, w. by the province of Quillota. Its territory is level and well watered. It is divided into two parts by a large river of the same name, having a bridge built of stone and mortar, w ith two arches. It produces abundance of wheat and much wild marjoram, which is carried to Peru, and forms the principal branch of its commerce. In this province is the royal road, lying through the Cordillera in the way to Mendoza, which is very rough and dangerous, on account of the many slopes and steep declivities towards the river ; the path is very narrow, and in various places it is necessary to open a pass by means of a pick-axe ; so that, if at any time the mules should crowd together, they would push each other into the river, w hich has not unfrequently been the case. The royal treasures are carried by this road from the month of Novem- ber to April and part of May. A few years since, some small houses of brick and mortar have been built on one or other side of the Cordillera, which they call casuchas (miserable huts) ; in these they put, in the winter time, some coal, biscuit, and hung beef, so that the couriers, providing them- selves with the keys of the doors at Mendoza, or, on the other side, at the Guardia of Aconcagua, may have something to live upon, incase they should be stopt by a fall of snow on their journey ; and with this precaution, a courier goes every month to Santiago, carrying with him the mails brought by the ships from Europe. In the winter it is customary to walk on foot over the snow, from Paramillo, which is three leagues from the top of the Cordillera, and four from its descent to tlie place which is called Los Ojos de Agua, through the valley of Putaendo ; but towards the ??. there is another way, which they call De Los Patos, which is the road generally taken in going to the city of San Juan ; but the Cordillera being more lofty here, it is only passable in the months of February and March. The inhabitants of this province amount, on an average, to 8000 souls. The capital' is San Felipe el Real. [Lat. 32° II' s. Long. 70° 12' 30" w. j

ACONCAGUA, a large river which runs through the above province, rising in the mountains of the Cordillera, and running through it by the side of the road which leads to Buenos Ayres : hrarcliing

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Villas. It contains 34 families of Indians, whocultivate and trade in grain, pulse, coal, and thebark of trees. A little more than two leagues tothe w. with a slight inclination to the s. of its headsettlement.

Agustin, San, another setttlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman in Peru ; si-tuate on the shore of the river Tercero (third river.)

Agustin, San, another settlement of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the king-dom of Guatemala.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Popayan in the kingdom of Quito.

Agustin, San, another of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres in Peru, on the shoreof the river Ibiquay.

Agustin, San, another of the province andalcaldia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva España,situate near the town of Rosario.

Agustin, San, a point or cape of the coast ofBrazil, in the province and captainship of Per-nambuco, between the port Antonio Vaz and theriver Tapado. One hundred leagues from thebay of Los Miiertos ; [300 miles n. e. from the bayof All Souls. Lat. 8° 38' s. Long. 35° 11' tc.]

Agustin, San, another point or cape of thecoast of the province and government of Rio deHacha, and kingdom of Tierra Firme, close to thelake of San Juan, on the e. side.

Agustin, San, a river of the province andgovernment of Antioquia, in the new kingdom ofGranada. It runs from s. to n. and afterwards,with a slight inclination to the w. enters the riverS. Juan, of the province of Choco.

Agustin, San, a small island of the gulph ofCalifornia, or Red Sea of Cortes ; situate in themost interior part of it, and near upon the coast ofNueva España, opposite the bay of San JuanBaptista.

[ AGWORTH, a township in Cheshire county.New Hampshire, incorporated in 1766, and con-tains 704 inhabitants ; eight miles e. by n. fromCharlestown, and 73n. w. by a), from Portsmouth.]

AHOME, a nation of Indians, who inhabit theshores of the river Zuaque, in the province ofCinaloa, and who are distant four leagues fromthe sea of California : they were converted to theCatholic faith by father Andres de Rivas, a Jesuit.Their country consists of some extensive and fer-tile plains, and they are by nature superior to theother Indians of Nueva España. Moreover, theirHeathenish customs do not partake so much of thespirit of barbarism. They abhorred polygamy,and held virginity in the highest estimation : andthus, by way of distinction, unmarried girls wore

a small shell suspended to their neck, until the dayof their nuptials, when it was taken off by the bride-groom. Their clothes were decent, composed ofwove cotton, and'they had a custom of bewailingtheir dead for a whole year, night and morning,with an apparently excessive grief. They aregentle and faithful towards the Spaniards, withwhom they have continued in peace and unityfrom the time of their first subjection. The prin-cipal settlement is of the same name, and lies atthe mouth of the river Fuerte, on the coast of thegulph of California,* having a good, convenient,and well sheltered port.

AHORCADOS, Point of the, on the shore ofthe large lake of Los Patos, of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil.

Ahorcados, some small islands or points onthe coast of the S. sea, in the district of SantaElena, of the province and government of Guay-aquil, close to the mouth of the river Colonche.

AHUACATEPEC, San Nicolas de, anothersettlement of the above head settlement and alcal-dia mayor.

AHUACATES, Santa Maria de, a branchof the head settlement of the district and alcaldiamayor of Cuernavaca in Nueva España.

AHUACATLAN, Santa Maria de, a set-tlement of the head settlement of the district ofSan Francisco del Talle, and alcaldia mayor ofZultepec, in Nueva España. It is of a cold tem-perature, inhabited by 51 families of Indians, anddistant three leagues s. of its head settlement.

Ahuacatlan (Zochicoatlan), another settlement of’the headsettlement and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan inNueva España. It is of a cold temperature, si-tuate on a small level plain, surrounded by hillsand mountains. It contains 13 families of In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. of its capital.

Ahuacatlan, with the dedicatory title of SanJuan, the head settlement of the district of thealcaldia mayor of Zacatlan in Nueva España.Its inhabitants are composed of 450 families ofIndians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mu-lattoes, including the settlements of the district.Five leagues from its capital, and separated by amountainous and rugged road, as also by a verybroad river, whose waters, in the winter time, in-crease to such a degree as to render all communi-cation between the above places impracticable.

Ahuacatlan, another, of the head settlementof the district of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa, in the above kingdom. It contains 160families of Indians, who trade in chia^ (a whitemedicinal earth), and grain, with which its territoryabounds. It lies n, w. of its head settlement.

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AHUACAZALCA, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of San Luis de la Costa,and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espaiia.It contains 56 families of Indians, -whose com-merce consists in rice and cotton. Three leaguesn. e. of its liead settlement.

AHUACAZINGO, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Atengo, and alcaldiamayor of Chilapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains46 families of Indians, and is ten leagues e. of itshead settlement.

AHUALICAN, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tixtlan in Nueva Espana ; of a benignand salutary temperature, as it is fanned by then,breezes. It lies three leagues n. of its head settle-ment, which is Oapan ; and contains 36 familiesof Indians.

AHUATELCO, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofIzucai in Nueva Espana, situate on the skirt of thevolcano of the same name. In its district areeight settlements, inhabited by 289 families of In-dians, and 11 of Musiees and Mulattoes, wholive in some temporary habitations for labourers.It is situate on a cold, rough, and barren soil, butis nevertheless fertile in wheat, and abounds inwater and cattle. Eight leagues n. w. of its capital.

AHUATEMPA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Santa Isabel, and alcaldiamayor of Cholula, in Nueva Espana. It contains 39families of Indians, and is two leagues s.of its capital.

AHUATEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espana. It contains 32 families of In-dians, and is two leagues n. of its capitaL

AHUATLAN, San Pedko de, a settlementof the head settlement of the district of San Juandel Rio, and alcaldia mayor of Queretaro, in NuevaEspana ; annexed to the curacy of the formerplace, and lying ten leagues n. w, of the latter.

AHUEHUEZINGO, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Chietlan, and alcaldiamayor of Izucar, in Nueva Espana.

AHUEZITLA, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espana. It contains 36 families of In-dians, and abounds in chia, (a white medicinalearth), grain, and earthen-ware. It is nine leaguesw, n. w. of its capital.

AHWAHHAWAY, a race of Indians, whodiffer but very little in any particular from theMandans, their neighbours, except in the unjustwar which they, as well as the Minetares, prosecuteagainst the defenceless Snake Indians. They claimto have once been a part of the Crow Indians, whom

they still acknowledge as relations. They haveresided on the Missouri as long as their traditionwill enable them to inform.

AIABACA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Piura in Peru.

AIACASI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Belille.

AIACOA, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises to the w. of the Sierra Maiguatida, runs e. andenters the Orinoco near the rapid stream of theMarumarota.

AIACOCHA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huanta in Peru, situate in theisland Tayacaja.

AIAHUALTEMPA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Zitlala, and alcaldia mayorof Chilapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 36 fa-milies of Indians, and is three leagues to the s. ofits head settlement.

AIAHUALULCO, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Ixlahuacan, and alcaldiamayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana, which, in theMexican language, signifies a small river. Itabounds in the best fruits of its jurisdiction, suchas pears and other sorts of fruit highly esteemed atVera Cruz. It contains only three families of Spa-niards, 22 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 70 of In-dians. In its district are several temporary habi.tations for labourers, and pastures for breeding cat-tle, which reach as far as the district of Tepcaca,in the lofty eminence of Xamiltepec, 16 leaguesdistant from Xalapa. It includes also within itsadministration the cultivated estates extending asfar as the place called Puertezuelo, where this juris-diction approximates to that of San Juan de losLlanos on the w. s.w. side ; and in the culture ofthe above estates many Spaniards, 3Iustees, andMulattoes, are employed. One league s. w. of itshead settlement.

Aiahualulco, another settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Zitlala, and alcaldiamayor of Chilapa, in the kingdom of Xalapa, andannexed to the curacy of this place, from which itis three leagues distant, being nine to the s. of itshead settlement. It contains 42 families of Indians,including another small settlement incorporatedwith it.

AlAHUASA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Pachaconas.

AIAMARCA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Castro Virreyna in Peru, an-nexed to the curacy of Cordova.

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which the inhabitants trade. These are composed of34 Indian families. It is a little more than threeleagues from its head settlement,

AIOZINGO, a settlement of the alcaldía mayorof Chaleo in Nueva España, situate on the shoreof the lake of Mexico, with a good port, at whichare embarked the fruits of many provinces for thesupply of that capital, (Chaleo), which is withineight or ten hours sail from hence. It has a goodconvent of S. Augustin, where a most beauti-ful image of the virgin is reverenced, and sup-posed to be wonder-working. Its inhabitants con-sist of 120 Indian families and some Spanish. Itis distant one league s, s. e. from its capital.

AIQUILE, a settlement of the province of Mizque in Peru.

AIRICOS, a nation of Indians who inhabit theplains of Cazanare and Meta, of the new kingdomof Granada, to the c. of the mountains of Bogota,on the borders of the river Ele. It is numerous,and feared by all its neighbours, on account of itsvalour and dexterity in the use of arms.

Airicos, with the dedicatory title of SanFrancisco Xavier, a settlement which belongedto the Jesuits, and founded in 1662 by father An-tonio de Monteverde, and composed of some ofthose Indians who were thus reduced to the Catho-lic faith.

AIRIHUANCA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cotabamba in Peru.

AIRS, a small city of the province and colonyof New Jersey, in the county of Burlington.

AIUDA, Nuestra Senora be la, a villageand settlement of the Portuguese, in the provinceand captainship of Pernambuco in Brazil, situateupon the sea-coast, and on the shore of the riverS. Miguel.

Aiuda, another settlement in the province andcaptainship of Puerto Seguro, situate upon thecoast on the shore of the port.

AIUILA, a river of the province and alcaldiamayor of Soconusco, in the kingdom of Guate-mala: It runs into the S. sea between the settle-ment of Suchitepec and the river Coatlan.

AIUINOS, a nation of Indians of the provinceand government of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana,converted to the faith by father Francisco Olinano,of the abolished society of the Jesuits, in 1624.They live towards the n. of the above province,and in the times of their heathenism they dwelt inthe lofty mountains, in order that they might de-fend themselves from the other nations with whomthey were at war. They are docile, well-inclined,and of good habits.

AIUN, or luMERi, a river of the province and

AKA

viceroyalty of Buenos Ayres. It runs s. and entersthe Rio Negro.

AIUNCHA, Pago BE, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucuman, in the districtand jurisdiction of the city of Santiago del Estero,from whence it is 22 leagues distant. It is situateon the shore of the river Dulce.

AIUTLA, the head settlement of the district ofthe alcaldia mayor of Villalta in Nueva Espana.It is of a cold temperature, containing 187 Indianfamilies, and a convent of the religious order of S.Domingo ; distant 13 leagues to the e. of its capi-tal.

Aiutla, another settlement in the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Autlanof the same kingdom, with 23 Indian families, whohave large stores of pulse and fruit, so rich and fer-tile is their country. It is annexed to the curacy ofTenamaztlani, from whence it lies one league s,

AlUA, a small town of the island of St. Domin-go, situate in the line which divides the Spanishterritory from the French. It was the inhabitantsof this town who chiefly contributed to ensure thevictory which was gained against the Spaniards inthe plain of Puerto Real, by the president DonFrancisco de Segura y Sandoval, in 1691.

AIX, Palmar be, a large beach on the coastof Florida, within the channel of Bahama, nearthe point of Canaveral ; memorable for the ship-wreck of 22 vessels, composing the fleet of NuevaEspana, which took place in 1715, being under thecommand of Don Antonio de Ubila ; memorablealso for the loss of two galleons from Tierra Firme,commanded by Don Antonio de Echevers ; theloss of the one and the other amounting to nearly20 million dollars.

Aix, a river of the same province, which runsinto the sea very near the Palmar.

AJOIANI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Carabaya in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Coaza.

[AJOS, a parish situate on the foot of the moun-tains which separate the rivers Paraguay and Pa-rana, about 24 leagues e. of Asuncion. Lat. 23°26' 34" s. Long. 56° 30' w.~\

AJOUES, a settlement of Indians of the pro-vince and government of Louisiana, in which theFrench held a garrison and fort for its defence, onthe shore of a lake near the Missouri.

A joues, another settlement of the same provinceand government, situate on the shore of the riverMissouri.

AKANCEAS, a nation of savage Indians of N.America, who live at the conflux of the riversMississippi, and another abundant stream of its

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ALACLATZALA, a branch of the head set-tlement of the district of S. Luis, of the coast andalcaldia mayor of TIapa in Nueva España. Itcontains 125 Indian families, and is one leaguefrom the settlement of Quanzoquitengo.

ALACRANES, some islands, or rather somehidden rocks, of the N. sea, in the bay of Mexico,opposite the coast of Yucatan. Those who navi-gate these parts are accustomed to pass round be-yond them for fear of venturing amongst them, al-though there are some good cliannels among them,and withgood soundings. They are for the most partbarren, producing nothing beyond a herb calledmoron, -And deficient in fresh water ; neither do theyproduce any animal except the mole, which isfound here in prodigious numbers. There are,however, a quantity of birds, of three distinct sorts,each forming a community of itself, and entirelyseparated from the other two ; and it has beenobserved, that if one party may have fixed uponany place for building their nests, the others neverthink of disturbing them, or driving them from it ;but the noise these birds make is so great, that onecannot pass near them without suffering consider-ably from their united clamours.

[ALADAS, a parish situate about 14; leaguess. e, of Corrientes, in Lat. 28° 15' 20" s. Long. 58°SO' e».]

ALAHUIZTLAN, San Juan de, a branchof the head settlement of the district of Escateopan,and alcaldia mayor of Zaqualpa, in Nueva España.It contains 270 Indian families.

ALAIN, a river of the province and govern-ment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito. It risesin the country of the Locamas Indians, runs fromj. to n. and turning to the n. n. e. enters the Pucaré.

ALAMEDA, a settlement of the missions be-longing to the religious of St. Francis in NuevoMexico.

ALAMILLOS, a settlement of the province ofTaraumara and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; oneof the missions which belonged to the religious ofSt Francis. It is close to the town and real ofthe mines of Santa Eulalia.

ALAMO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of the new kingdom of Leon, situ-ate 15 leagues to the s. e. of the Point.

ALAMOS, Real de Los, Real de Los, a settlement andreal of the mines of the province of Sinaloa inNueva España. It is situate s. e. of the SierraMadre, and surrounded by rich silver mines,which would produce abundantly but for want oflabourers. There are in its district five estatesthat are fertile in maize, French beans, and sugar-cane. The spiritual concerns of all these parts

are under the direction of a curate, whose jurisdic-tion extends as far as the river Mayo, which flowsdown from the sierra. It is 20 leagues distantfrom the town of Tuerte, and between these liesthe valley of Maquipo. [Population 7900 souls]

Alamos, with the dedicatory title of S. Jorge,a town of the province and captainship of Para inBrazil, founded by Jorge del Alamo, who gaveit his name, in a place called La Vigia. It has amagnificent parish church, with the title of NuestraSenora de Nazareth, with a large and good fort,and well furnished with artillery. Also, at the dis-tance of a league and an half from the settlement,is a house of charity belonging to the religiousorder of the Capuchins of La Piedad.

Alamos, another town of the province and go-vernment of Sonora, in the line that divides theconfines of this jurisdiction and the province ofOstimuri, between the rivers Hiaqui and LaSonora.

Alamos (Sonora near Coro de Guachi), another settlement of the same pro-vince and government as the former, situate tothe s. of the garrison of Coro de Guachi.

Alamos, another of the missions belonging tothe abolished society of Jesuits, in the provinceof Taraumara and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya.It is 27 leagues s. w. and a quarter of a league s.of the real of the mines and town of S. Felipe deChiguaga.

Alamos, another settlement and real of thesilver mines of the province and government ofCinaloa.

ALANGASI, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the district of the corregimiento of theCinco Leguas de la Capital. In its territory is afountain of hot medicinal waters.

Alangasi, a river of the above corregimiento,and rising in the desert mountain of Sincholagua ;over it there is a large bridge, composed of a singlearch, but so strong, that when, in 1660, a partof the mountain fell upon it, and precipitated onehalf of it into the stream, the other half still re-mained firm and immoveable. This bridge isbuilt of mud and stone.

ALANIS, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Maracaibo, in the district of the cityof Merida, situate in the way whicE leads fromthis city to the new kingdom of Grenada.

ALANGI, Santiago de, a city and headsettlement of the district of the province of Chi-riqui and government of Santiago de Veragua,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It is small, butabounding in fruits and cattle ; in which a regulartrade is carried on for supplying the city of Pa-nama. This trade consists principally in pigs.

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state to maintain itself. Thus the colonists lived for some years, and in time the productions in which their commerce consisted, increased to such a degree as to have caused them to excel all the other English colonies,

ALUEMAur.E, another county or part of Vir- ginia, washed by the river Fluvana on the s. which divides itself into several branches, and adds much to the fertility of the country. It is bounded e. by the county of Goochland, w. divided by a chain of mountains of Augusta, and by that of Louisa on the «. [It contains 12,585 inha- bitants, including 5579 slaves. Its extent, about S5 miles square.]

Albemarle, a strait, which is the mouth or entrance into the sea of the river Roanoke.

ALBERTO, a small settlement or ward of the head settlement of the district of Tlazintla, and alcafdia mayor of Ixmiqailpan, in Nueva Espana.

[ALBION, New, the name given by Sir Francis Drake to California, and part of the n. w. coast of America, when he took possession of it. A large uncertain tract of the n. w, coast is thus called. Its limits, according to Mr. Arrow- smith’s chart, are between 27° 12' and 41° 15' 71. lat. Humboldt asserts, that, agreeably to sure historical data, the denomination of New Albion ought to be limited to that part of the coast which extends from the 43° to the 48°, or from Cape White of Martin de x\guilar, to the entrance of Juan de Fuea. Besides, he adds, from the mis- sions of the Catholic priests to those of the Greek priests, that is to say, from the Spanish village of San Francisco, in New California, to the Russian establishments on Cook river at Prince William’s bay', and to the islands of Kodiac and Unalaska, there are more than a thousand leagues of coast inhabited by' free men, and stocked with otters and Phocre! Consequently, the discussions on the extent of the New Albion of Drake, and the pre- tended rights acquired by certain European na- tions, from planting small crosses, and leaving inscriptions fastened to trunks of trees, or the burying of bottles, may be considered as futile. The part of the coast on which Capt. Cook landed on the 7th of March 1778, and which some desig- nate as Nezo Albion, is in n. lat. 44° 33'. e. long. 235° 10', which he thus describes : “ The land is lull of mountains, the tops of w hich are covered with snow, while the vallies between them, and the grounds on the sea-coast, high as well as low, are covered with trees, which form a beautiful prospect, as of one vast forest. At first the natives seemed to prefer iron to every other article of

commerce; at last they preferred brass. They were more tenacious of their property than any of the savage nations that had hitherto been met with ; so that they would not part with wood, water, grass, nor the most trifling article without a compensation, and were sometimes very unrea- sonable in their demands.” See Calii^ornia, New.]

ALBOR, a small island of the N. or Atlantic sea, one of the Bahamas, between those of Neque and 8. Salvador.

ALBUQUERQUE, Santa Rosa de, a settle- ment and real of the silver mines of the alcaldia mayor of Colotlan in Nueva Espana. It is 19 leagues s. w. of the head settlement of the district of Tlaltcnango.

Albuquehque, a townof New Mexico, situate on the shore of the Rio Grande (large river) of the N. [opposite the village of Atrisco, to the w. of tlie Sierra Obseqra. Population 0000 souls.]

Albuquerque, a small island, or low rocks, of the N. sea, near that of 8. Andres.

ALCA, a settlement of the province and corre- gimienlo of Condensuyos of Arequipa in Peru.

ALCALA, a settlement of the province and alcaldia mayor of Chiapa, and kingdom of Gua- temala, in the division and district of that city.

ALCAMANI, a branch of the head settlement of the district and alcaldia mayor of Igualapa in Neuva Espana, and two leagues to the n. of the same.

ALCANTARA, S. Antonio de, a town of the province and captainship of Maranam' in the kingdom of Brazil. It luis been frequently invaded by the infidel Indians, who destroyed its work- shops, so that its inhabitants have been much reduced.

Alcantara, S. Antonio de, another settle- ment in the province and district of Chanco, in the kingdom of Chile, near the shore of the rivec Mataquino.

ALCARAI, a small river of the province and government of Buenos Ayres. It runs e. and enters the river La Plata between those of Lay- man and Gomez.

ALCATRACES, Ishmd of the, one of those which lie n. of St. Domingo, between the s. point of the Caico Grande, and the Panuelo Quadrado, (square handkerchief).

ALCIIICHlCd, 8 . Martin de, a ward of the head settlement erf the district and alcaldia mayor of Izucar in Nueva Espana, belonging to that of Santa Maria de la Asuncion.

ALCHIDOMAS, a settlement of the province of the Apaches in Nuevo Mexico, situate on the

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escape the destruction which followed them where-ever they fled. Still are the vestiges of this cala-mity to be seen, and there are large quantities ofthis mud or lava, now become hard, scattered onthe s. side of the settlement.

CARHUA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of its capital.

CARHUACAIAN, a settlement of the same pro-vince and corregimiento as the former ; annexedto the curacy of Pomacocha.

CARHUACALLANGA, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Jauja in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Chongos.

CARHUACUCHO, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Laramate.

CARHUAMAIO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Tarma in Peru.

CARHUAPAMPA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; an-nexed to the curacy of Lorenzo de Quinti.

Carhuapampa, another settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Cajatambo in the samekingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Hacas.

CARHUAZ, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huailas in Peru.

CARI, a river of the province and governmentof Cumaná in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. Itrises in the Mesa (Table-land) de Guanipa, andruns s. being navigable to the centre of the pro-vince, and enters the Orinoco near the narrowpart.

Cari, a settlement of the same province; oneof those under the care of the religious order of S.Francisco, missionaries of Piritu. It is situateon the shore of the former river.

CARIAI, a small river of the country of theAmazonas, in the part possessed by the Portuguese.It is by no means a considerable stream, runs n.and enters the Xingu.

CARIACO, a large gulf of the coast of TierraFirme, in the province and government of Curnana.It is also called, Of Curnana, from this -capital beingbuilt upon its shores. The bajr runs 10 or 12leagues from w. to c. and is one league toroad atits widest part. It is from 80 to 100 fathomsdeep, and the waters are so quiet as to resemblerather the waters of a lake than those of the ocean.It is surrounded by the serramasy or lofty chainsof mountains, which shelter it from all winds ex-cepting that of the n. e. which, blowing on it as itwere through a straitened and narrow passage,it accustomed to cause a swell, especially from 10

m the morning until five in the evening, after whichall becomes calm. Under the above circumstances,the larger vessels ply to windward ; and if thewind be very strong, they come to an anchor outhe one or other coast, and wait till the evening,when the land breezes spring up from the s. e. Inthis gulf there are some good ports and bays, viz.the lake of Obispo, of Juanantar, of Gurintar,and others.

Cariaco, a river of the same province and go-vernment, taking its rise from many streams andrivulets which rise in the serrania, and unite be.fore they flow into the valley of the same Uame.After it has run some distance over the plain, it iscut off' to water some cacao plantations, and thenempties itself into the sea through the former gulf.In the winter great part of the capital, which issituate upon its banks, is inundated, and the riveris tlien navigated by small barks or barges ; but inthe summer it becomes so dry that there is scarce-ly water sufficient to nqvigate a canoe.

Cariaco, a small city of the same province,situate on the shore of the gulf. [This city (ac-cording to Depons) bears, in the official papersand in the courts of justice, the name of San Fe-lipe de Austria. The population is only 6500,but every one makes such a good use of his timeas to banish misery from the place. The produc-tion most natural to the soil is cotton, the beautyof which is superior to that of all Tierra Firme.This place alone furnishes annually more than3000 quintals ; and besides cacao they grow a littlesugar. Lat. 10° SO' n. Long. 63° 39' w.

(CARIACOU is the ehief of the small isles de-pendent on Granada island in the West Indies;situate four leagues from isle Rhonde, which is alike distance from the «. end of Granada. It con-tains 6913 acres of fertile and well cultivated land,producing about 1,000,000 lbs. of cotton, be-sides corn, yams, potatoes, and plaintains for theNegroes. It has two singular plantations, and atown called Hillsborough.)

CARIAMANGA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom ofQuito.

CARIATAPA, a settlement which belonged tothe missions of the regular order of the Jesuits, inthe province of Topia and kingdom of Nueva Viz-caya ; situate in the middle of the sierra of thisname, and on the shore of the river Piastla.

CARIBABARE, a small settlement which be-longed to the missions of the regular order of thsJesuits, in the province and government of SanJuan de los Llanos of the new kingdom of Granada.

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emolument which used to be derived to the Eng-lish froPA the skins of the castor, is at presentgreatly abridged from the circumstance of the In-dians invariably destroying this animal; but theloss is in a great measure made up from the greatgain acquired in the sale of turpentine, fish, andpitch. Here they cultivate quantities of indigoof three sorts, much maize, and in the low landsexcellent rice. All this province is a plain 80miles in length, carrying on a great commerce inthe above productions, and formerly that of ricewas very considerable; it being computed to haveyielded that article to the value of 150,000/. ster-ling per annum. In its woods are many exquisitekinds of timber, and the country abounds withrabbits, hares, dantas, deer, pheasants, partridges,cranes, pigeons, and other birds, and with num-bers of ravenous and fierce wolves, against theattacks of which it is difficult to preserve thecattle. The European animals have also multi-plied here astonishingly, so that it is not unusualfor persons, who at first had not more than three orfour cows, now to possess as many thousands.These two provinces forming Carolina have 10navigable rivers, with an infinite number of smallernote, all abounding in fish ; but they hare fewgood ports, and the best of these is Cape Fear.N. Carolina is not so rich as is S. Carolina, andDenton was formerly the capital of the former,but it is at present reduced to a miserable village ;the capital of both is Charlestown, which since thelast w^r is independent of the jEnglish, togetherwith all the country, which now forms one of the 13provinces composing the United States of America.[See North Carolina and South Carolina.]

(CAROLINE County, in Virginia, is on the s.side of Rappahannock river, which separates itfrom King George’s county. It is about 40 milessquare, and contains 17,489 inhabitants, including10,292 slaves.)

(Caroline County, on the e. shore in Mary-land, borders on Delaware state to the e. and con-tains 9506 inhabitants, including 2057 slaves. Itschief town Danton.)

CARONI, a settlement of the province ofGuayana, and government of Cumana ; one ofthose of the missions held in that province by theCatalanian Capuchin fathers.

Caroni, another, in the government of Mara-caibo, and jurisdiction of Varinas. It is very poorand of a hot temperature, but abounding in fruitsof maize, yucas, plaintains, and sugar-canes.

Caroni, another, in the government of the NuevoReyno de Granada ; situate on a lofty spot, andone of the most pleasant and delightful of any in the

whole province. It abounds in gold mines, andis fertile in all the fruits peculiar to the climate,but it is much reduced.

Caroni, a large and abundant river of the pro-vince of Guayana. It rises in the mountains in-habited by the Mediterranean Caribes Indians,runs many leagues, laving the territory of the Ca-puchin missionaries of Guayana. Its shores arevery delightful, from the variety of trees and birdsfound upon them. It enters the Orinoco on the s.side, eight leagues from the garrison of Guayana,and 72 leagues before this river enters the sea, be-ing divided into two arms, which form a smallisland. It is very abundant and wide, but it isnot navigable, on account of the rapidity of its cur-rent, and from its being filled with little islands andshoals, as likewise on account of a great waterfallor cataract, which causes a prodigious noise, and isclose to the mission and settlement of Aguacagua.Its waters are very clear, although at first sightthey appear dark and muddy, which effect is pro-duced from the bed of the river being of a sand ofthis colour. Its source, though not accuratelyknown, is affirmed by the Caribes Indians to bein the snowy sierra to the n. of the lake of Parime,that also being the source by which this lake issupplied. At its entrance into the Orinoco, itgushes with &uch impetuosity as to repel the watersof this river the distance of a gun’s shot, [or, as'Depons observes, half a league. Its course is di-rectly from s. to n. and its source is more than100 leagues from its mouth.]

CAROPI, a river of the island and governmentof Trinidad. It runs from e. to w. and enters thesea in the gulf Triste.

==CARORA, S. Juan Bautista del Por-tillo DE==, a city of the province and governmentof Venezuela, founded by Captain John Salamancain 1572, and not in 1566, as is asserted by FatherColeti, in the Siege of Baraquiga. It is situate inthe savanas or Uanuras ; is of a hot temperature,but very healthy, although deficient in water,since the river Morere, which passes in its vicinity,affords but a trifling stream in tlie summer, and isat times entirely dry. In its district are bred allkinds of cattle, but particularly thegoat, as the quan-tities of thorns and thistles found in this countryrender it peculiarly adapted for the nourishmentof this animal. It abounds in very fine grains,also in aromatic balsams and gums, noted for thecure of w'ounds. At present it is reduced to amiserable population, unworthy of the name of acity, consisting of Mustees, Mulattoes, and some In-dians.; but it still preserves a very good parishchurch, a convent of monks of St. hhancisco, and

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CARTAGENA.

San Nicolas de laPaz,

San J uan de lasPalmas,

Pueblo Nuevo,Santero,

Lorica,

San Nicolas deBari,

San Bernardo A-bad,

Morales,

Babilla,

Tablada,

Tiquicio de Aden-tro,

Tiquicio de Afu-era,

Majagua,

Nechi,

San Marcos,

San Pelajo,

Zerete,

Zienega del Oro,San Carlos de Co-losina.

San Geronimo deBuenavista.

The capital is a large city adorned with beauti-ful buildings, founded by Pedro de Heredia in1533, on the shore of a great and very convenientbay more than two leagues in length. It was call-ed Calamari in the time of the Indians, which sig-nifies, in their language, the land of craw-fish, fromthe abundance of these found in it. It is situateon a sandy island, which forming a narrow strait,gives a communication to the part called TierraBomba ; on the left it is entered by a woodenbridge, having a suburb called Xiximani, whichis another island uniting with the continent bymeans of a bridge in the same manner as itself.It is well fortified, and is the residence of a go-vernor, with the title of captain-general, dependenton the viceroy of Santa Fe, having beeu indepen-dent till the year 1739. Besides the precinct andbastions, it has a half-moon, which defends theentrance or gate ; and at a small distance is thecastle of San Felipe de Baraxas, situate on aneminence, and on the side of the bay the castles ofSan Luis, Santa Cruz, San Joseph, San P'elipe,and Pastelillo, which were rebuilt in a modernmanner, in 1654;, by the Lieutenant-general DonIgnacio de Sala, with the names of San Fernando,San Joseph, El Angel, and El Pastelillo. Thecathedral church is magnificent, and included in itis the parish of Sagrario, besides two other pa-rishes called La Trinidad and Santo Toribo. Ithas the convents of monks of St. Francisco, St.Domingo, St. Augustin, St. Diego, La Merced,and San Juan de Dios, which is an hospital, andsituate at the top of a high mountain without thewalls of the city, at a quarter of a league’s dis-tance from the convent of the barefooted Augustins,called Nuestra Senora de la Popa ; to this con-vent vessels are accustomed to offer up a salutationas soon as they discover it at sea. It has also acollege which belonged to the society of Jesuits,a convent of Santa Clara, one of the Observersof San Francisco, and another of barefooted Car-

melites. At a small distance without the city isthe hospital of San Lazaro for lepers, which ma-lady is epidemical in the country. It has also atribunal of the inquisition, established in 1610, ofwhich there is only three in all America, and put-tingthis city, in this pointof view, onafooting withthe metropolitan cities Lima and Mexico. It is thehead of a bishopric erected in 1534 by his holinessClement VII. The bay abounds in fish of variouskinds, but it is infested by marine wolves. Theclimate of this city is very hot ; from May to No-vember, which are the winter months, thunder,rain, and tempests are very frequent, but fromthis inconvenience they derive an advantage offilling with water their cisterns, called aijibes, andwhich afford them the only supply of this inostnecessary article ; accordingly every house is fur-nished with one of these cisterns : from Decemberto April, which is the summer, the heat is exces-sive, occasioning continual perspiration, whichdebilitates the frame, and causes the inhabitants tohave a pale and unhealthy appearance, althoughthey nevertheless enjoy good health, it being notunusual to find amongst them persons exceeding80 years of age. The irregularity of this climateproduces several very afflicting disorders, as theblack vomit, which is most common amongststrangers and sea-faring people, few of whom havethe luck to escape it, but no person ever has ittwice. The inhabitants are likewise much trou-bled with the leprosy, or disease of St. Lazarus ; theculebrilla, which is an insect which breeds under theskin, and causes a swelling which is accustomed toterminate in gangrene and spasms or convulsions :besides these inconveniences, there are multitudesof troublesome insects which infest the houses,such as beetles, niguas, scorpions, centipeds, andmorcielagos. The largest trees are the caob, thecedar, the maria, and balsam ; of the first aremade canoes, out of the solid trunk, for fishing andcommerce ; the red cedar is better than the white,and the two last, not to mention their utility fromthe compactness of their timber, for their delicioussmell and beautiful colour, are the trees fromwhence are procured those admirable distillationscalled the oil of Maria and balsam of Tolu. Hereare also tamarind trees, medlars, sapotas, papai/as,cassias, and Indian apple trees, producing deli-cate and pleasant fruits ; the fruit, however, of thelast mentioned is poisonous, and many who, de-ceived by the beauty of these apples, have therashness to taste them, soon repent of their folly,for they immediately swell to a distressing degree :so if perchance any one should sleep under itsbranches, he will be afflicted in the same way.

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C H A

C H A

Brocal de la Mina de, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru ;finnexed to the curacy of Santa Barbara.

CHACLAIA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Ambana.

CHACLIA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huarochiri in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Santa Olaya.

CHACMA, or Chamaca, a valley of the pro-vince of Cuzco and kingdom of Peru, near thecoast of the S. sea. It was well peopled in formertimes, and abounds now in sugar-cane, from whichsugar is made. It was conquered and united tothe empire by Huaina Capac, thirteenth Emperor.

CHACNA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Colcabamba.

CHACO, a province of the kingdom of Peru,called the Gran Chaco, is an extensive country ;having as its boundary to the e. the river Para-guay, and being bounded on the [n.e. by the pro-vince of the Chiquitos Indians ; on the n. by thatof Santa Cruz de la Sierra ; on the zo. it touchesupon the provinces of Mizque, Tomina, Porna-bamba, Pilaya, Paspaya, Tarija, and Tucuman.On the s. it extends as far as the jurisdiction of thegovernment of Buenos Ayres, which is its farthestlimits. Towards the n. it is 150 leagues widefrom e. to w. and 250 leagues long from n. to s. ;but to make these distances, it requires manymonths, owing to the unevenness and roughness ofthe territory. It is called Chaco, or, with morepropriety, Chacu, which, in the Quechuan lan-guage, signifies junta, or company, from the cir-cumstance of its having been formed of Indians ofseveral countries, who had fled from the conquer-ing arms of the Incas, and afterwards from thoseof the Spaniards. Towards the w. it has someserraniasj which are branches of the cordilhrn ;where, on account of their immense height, thecold is very great ; but in the low grounds, whichare for the most part plains, the temperature is hot.It is full of thick woods, and in many parts isswampy and wet ; particularly in the part lyingtowards the e. on the road to Paraguay. In thewet season, which lasts from the month of Novem-ber to April, the rivers leave their beds and formvarious lakes, some of which dry up, and someremain. This province has some rivers of note ;such are the Salado and the Bermejo ; is one of themost fertile provinces in America, and would, ifit were cultivated, afford, in the greatest abun-dance, those productions wnich are now thrownaway upon the infinite number of barbarous na-

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tions who inhabit it. It produces a great varietyof fine woods and fruit-trees; such as walnuts andnuts, although different from those of Europe, butwhich arc extremely well tasted ; beautiful cedars ;quebrachos^ thus called on account of their hard-ness ; guqyacanes, carob-trees, balsams, marias,palms, some of which are more than 30 yards inheight; almonds, cacaos, ceihas, whicli are verylarge trees, bearing in the pods a remarkable softwool, used for quilts, since it cannot be spun ; cot-ton-trees, mistoles, of the heart of which the In-dians make darts and cimeters ; myrrh, sarzafraz-trees, bark, and others, which have the interiorbark so delicate and white as occasionally to serveinstead of writing paper; others there are, whicli,at one or two yards up their stems, form a kind ofbarrel or pipe, and being of a very tough bark,are accustomed to be ripped open by the Indians,and thus serve as vessels, in which these keep theirliquor called chieha ; it is from this that theywhimsically call this plant palo borracho, ordrunken tree. In this province are found alsocanes for walking sticks, as fine as those of Asia ;and in the trunks of trees, in holes of the rocksand below the ground, are quantities of honey andwax wrought by bees, of which there are reckonedto be more than 12 sorts : some of the wax, besidesbeing transparent, is extremely fragrant and deli-cious to the taste, whilst some is so sour as to re-semble the juice of boiled lemons. One sort ofthese bees fabricate, with great skill, excellenthives of mud upon the branches of trees, and ofthe shape of a decanter, which are so hard thatthey will not break in falling down upon theground ; they, morever, are filled Avith exquisitewax and Avell-flavoured honey. The fruit-treeswhich this province produces, are oranges, cedars,lemons, apples, pears, melocotones^ (or peaches en-grafted on quinces), figs, nuts, prunes, and olives,also passion-floAvers ; all of which have beenbrought hither from the city of Santiago de Gua-dalcazar. Here are palms Avhich have cups con-taining 25 kernels each, differing only slightlyfrom the palms of Europe by having a flavour ofthe cocoa, and being somewhat larger. Here isalso a plant called chahuar, having prickles likethe savine, of which are made threads similar tohemp, for the manufacture of nets, bags, and somesorts of coarse garments : its root serves as food forthe Indians, as do also yucas, potatoes, and others.It has an innumerable quantity of birds, namely,Avild pigeons, ducks, herons, mountain-peacocks’pheasants, crows, condors, partridges, falcons,SAvans, periguanas, ostriches, parrots, and onekind of bird which exactly imitates an organ, and

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CHAQUIMINAS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Asangaro in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Sandia in the province of Ca-rabaya.

CHARABAYE, a settlement of the provinceand government of Venezuela ; situate on the shoreof a river in the district of the city of Caracas, andto the e. of the town of Victoria.

CHARACATO, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Arequipa in Peru. In itschurch is a miraculous image of Nuestra Senorade la Purificacion or Candelaria, to which singulardevotion is paid.

CHARAI, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Cinaloa ; situate on the shore ofa river of the fort which lies between the settle-ments of Ziribijoa and Mochicauchi.

(CHARAIBES, See Caribe.)

CHARALA, a settlement of the jurisdiction ofthe town of San Gil, in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada, is, at it were, a suburb to the settlement ofMongui, and it is (being very poor and reduced)annexed to the curacy of the same. Its tempera-ture is mild, and abounds in pure good water, andin the productions of a hot climate.

CHARANDO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Guimeo, and alcaldia mayor of Cirandaro,in Nueva Espafia ; annexed to the curacy of Turi-cato.

CHARAPA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Periban in Nueva España ;situate in the loftiest part of the sierra, fromwhence its temperature is so cold that it is seldomany crops can be gathered from the seeds that aresown. It contains 209 families of Indians, 80 inthe wards of its district, and a convent of the reli-gious order of St. Francis : lies e. of its head settle-ment.

CHARAPE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Jaen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito.

CHARAPOTO, a settlement of the district ofPuerto Viejo, and government of Guayaquil, in thekingdom of Quito, at a small distance from thesea-coast and bay of its name ; this title beingalso applied to the point which forms the samebay.

CHARAZANI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHARBON, Rio del, a river of N. Carolina,which runs n. and enters the Conhaway. Thewhole of it abounds in cataracts, and its watersthrow up immense quantities of coal, which wasthe cause of its being thus named.

CHARCA, a settlement of the province and

corregimiento of Chayanta in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Sacaca.

CHARCANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacochas in Peru.

CHARCAS, an extensive province of the king-dom of Peru, composed of various others. Its ju-risdiction comprehends the district of this royalaudience, which begins at Vilcanota, of the cor-regimiento of Lampa and bishopric of Cuzco, andextends as far as Buenos Ayres to the s. It isbounded on the e. by Brazil, the meridian servingas a limit ; and reaching w. as far as the corregi-miento of Atacama, which is of its district, andforms the most n. part of this province in that di-rection, and being closed in on its other sides bythe kingdom of Chile : is 300 leagues in length, in-cluding the degrees of latitude from 20° to 28° s . :is in many parts very thinly peopled, and coveredwith large desert tracts, and rugged and impene-trable mountains, and again by the elevated cordil-leras of the Andes, and the spacious llanuras orpampas, which serve to mark its size and the relativedistances of its territories. Its temperature through-out is extremely cold, although there are not want-ing parts which enjoy a moderate warmth. At thetime that this province was in the possession of theIndians, and previous to the entrance of the Spa-niards, many well-inhabited provinces went jointlyunder the name of Charcas ; and the conquest ofthese was first undertaken by Capac Yupanqui,fifth Emperor ; but he was not able to pass the ter-ritory of the Tutiras Indians and of Chaqui. Hereit was that his conquests terminated : nor did thesubjection of these parts extend farther than Col-laysuyo until after his death, when he was suc-ceeded by his son the Inca Roca, sixth Emperor,who carried on still farther the victories which hadbeen already gained, conquering all the nations asfar on as that of Chuquisaca, where he afterwardsfounded the city of this name, called also La Plata.After that the Spaniards had reduced that part ofPeru, extending from Tumbez to Cuzco, and thatthe civil wars and dissensions which existed be-tween these were at an end, they endeavoured tofollow up their enterprise by making a conquest ofthe most distant nations. To this end, in 1538,Gonzalo Pizarro sallied forth with a great force,and attacking the Charcas and the Carangues,found in them such a spirited opposition, that afterseveral battles he was brought to think this objectwas nearly impracticable : this idea was strength-ened by the reception he had met with from theChuquisacas, who in many conflicts had given himconvincing proofs of their valour and warlikespirit ; indeed it is thought, that had he not just

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at that critical moment received fresh succours,that were sent from Cuzco by his brother the Mar-quis Don Francisco Pizarro, he would have fallena sacrifice, with the whole of the Spanish army, tothat undertaking : but being invigorated by thisassistance, he succeeded in routing the Indians,and in obliging them to surrender to the Spanishgovernment. In 1539 the Marquis Don Fran-cisco Pizarro, seeing the importance of making anestablishment here, resolved upon building of atown, giving a commission to Captain Pedro Au-zures to execute the same. This person actuallyput into effect the plan suggested, founding thetown in exactly the same spot in which formerlystood the settlement of Chuquisaca. Here manyof its conquerors settled and became citizens, andthey gave it the name of La Plata, or Silver, fromsome mines of this metal which are found in themountain of Porco, which lies at a small distancefrom this city, and from which the Inca Emperorswere accustomed to extract immense emolument.Notwithstanding this name it has never lost itsoriginal title, Chuquisaca, although indeed it isbadly pronounced by the Spaniards ; since the In-dians, and with great propriety, will have it Cho-quezaca, Choquechaca, or Choquisacha; all ofwhich, however pronounced, signify, the first,moun-tains of gold ; the second, cunchos of gold, orfields of brambles with yellow twigs ; and the third,bridges of gold. Although this province is exten-sive, it is composed of various others, which weshall notice under their proper heads. This keepsits present name, from being the one of all theothers the most abounding in minerals, seeds, andcattle ; as well as being the one best peopled withIndians. It is watered by many large rivers ; andthe whole of it composes an archbishopric, towhich arc suffragan the bishoprics of La Paz,Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Tucuman, Paraguay,and Buenos Ayres. It belongs to the viceroyaltyof this latter place since the time that this waserected, and that the government was entrusted tothe royal audience established in 1559. The afore-said district comprehends in its jurisdiction allthe following provinces and corregimientos :Tomino, Cochabamba,

Porco, Chayanta,

Tarija, Paria,

Lipes, Carangas,

Amparaez, Cicasica,

Oruro, Atacama ;

Pilaya,

In which are contained 188 settlements and cura-cies, in which there were in 1651 about 100,000Indians. The capital of the whole jurisdiction is

the aforesaid city of Chuquisaca or La Plata. —[Charcas joined the new government of BuenosAyres in 1810. See La Plata,]

Those who have been Presidents in the RoyalAudience of Charcas.

1. The Licentiate Pedro Ramirez de Quinones,first president, in 1559.

2. The Licentiate Juan de Matienzo, a cele-brated jurisconsult, in 1580.

3. The Licentiate Zepeda, in 1588.

4. The Licentiate Alonso Maldonado de Torres,in 1606.

5. Don Juan de Lizarazu, knight of the orderof Santiago ; he passed over to the presidency ofQuito in 1612.

6. Don Diego de Portugal, in 1614.

7. Don Alonzo Perez de Salazar, who was pre-sident of Quito, and was promoted to this, wherehe governed until the year 1620.

8. Don Juan de Caravajal y Sande, promotedin 1633.

9. Don Dionisio Perez Manrique, knight ofthe order of Santiago, collegiate in the collegeof Los Manriques de Alcala, rector of the uni-versity there, oidor of Lima, and president ofQuito, from whence he was removed to be pre-sident of this audience of Charcas in 1646 ; whence,having exercised it till 1654, he was removed tothat of Santa Fe.

10. Don Pedro Vazquez de Velasco, who pre-sided until the year 1661.

11. Don Bartolome Gonzalez de Poveda, pro-moted in 1678 ; he was made archbishop of theholy church of Charcas, remaining in the presi-dency until 1688.

12. Don Diego Mesia, native of Lima, oidor ofits royal audience, and formerly of that of Quito ;he was promoted to the presidency of Charcas in1688.

13. Don Jorge Manrique de Lara, who wasoidor of Panama, afterwards of Charcas, as alsopresident.

14. Don Gabriel Antonio Matienzo, president in1723.

15. Don Francisco de Herboso, who was ap-pointed in 1725, and presided until 1732.

16. Don Agustin de Jauregui, knight of theorder of Santiago, and native of Lima.

17. Don Juan Francisco Pestana, adjutant-major of the regiment of Spanish guards ; he wasnominated in 1752, and presided until 1769.

18. Don Ambrosio de Benavides, who enteredin the above year, and presided until 1777.

19. Don Agustin de Pinedo, who succeededthe former, and governed until 1782.

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appears to have been a settlement towards the n,of the island, from some vestiges still remaining.It is at present frequented only by some of the in-liabitants of Chepo, who cultivate and gather hereoral^ges, lemons, and plantains of an excellent fla-vour, which are found here in abundance. Inlat. 8^ 57' n.

CHEPO, San Christoval de, a settlementof the province and kingdom of Tierra Firme, andgovernment of Panama ; situate on the shore ofthe river Mamoni ; is of a kind temperature, fer-tile and agreeable, though little cultivated. Theair is however so pure that it is resorted to byinvalids, and seldom fails of affording a speedyrelief. It has a fort, which is an esfacada, or sur-rounded with palisades, having a ditch furnishedwith six small cannon, and being manned by adetachment from the garrison of Panama, for thepurpose of suppressing the encroachments of theinfidel Indians of Darien. This territory was dis-covered by Tello Guzman in 1515, who gave itthe name of Chepo, through its Cazique Chepauri,in 1679. It was invaded by the pirates Bartholo-mew Charps, John Guarlem, and Edward Bol-men, when the settlement Avas robbed and destroy-ed, and unheard-of prosecutions and tormentswere suffered by the inhabitants. Fourteen leaguesnearly due e. of Panama, [and six leaguesfrom the sea ; in lat. 9° 8' «.]

CHEQUELTI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chilcas and Tarija in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of its capital.

(CHEQUETAN, or Seguataneio, on thecoast of Mexico or New Spain, lies seven leaguesw. of of the rocks of Seguataneio. Between thisand Acapulco, to the e. is a beach of sand, of 18leagues extent, against which the sea breaks soviolently, that it is impossible for boats to land onany part of it ; but there is a good anchorage forshipping at a mile or two from the shore duringthe fair season. The harbour of Chequetan is veryhard to be traced, and of great importance tosuch vessels as cruise in these seas, being the mostsecure harbour to be met with in a vast extent ofcoast, yielding plenty of wood and water; andthe ground near it is able to be defended by a fewmen. When Lord Anson touched here, theplace was uninhabited.)

CHEQUIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Maúle in the kingdom of Chile,and in the valley or plain of Tango, near the riverColorado. In its vicinity, toAvards the s. is anestate called El Portrero del Key, at the source ofthe river Maipo.

CHERA, a river near Colan, in the province ofQuito in Peru, running to Amotage ; from AvhencePaita has its fresh Avatcr.

CHERAKEE. See Cherokee.

CHERAKIKAU, a river of the province andcolony of South Carolina. It runs e. and entersthe river Cliuvakansty. On its shore is a smallsettlement of Indians of the same name.

CHERAKILICHI, or Apalachicola, a fortof the English , in the province and colony of Georgia,on the shore of the river Apalachicola, and at the con-flux, or where this river is entered by the Caillore.

CHERAN EL Grande, S. Francisco de, asettlement of the head settlement of Siguinan, andalcaldia mayor of Valladolid, in Nueva Espana,contains 100 families of Curtidores Indians, and isa little more than half a league from its head set-tlement.

CHERAPA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiernto of Piura in Peru, on the confines ofthe province of Jaen de Bracamoros, upon the riverTambarapa, is of a hot and moist temperature,and consequently unhealthy ; and is situate in theroyal road which leads from Lpxa through Aya-baca and Guancabamba to Tomependa, a port ofthe river Maranon.

(CHERAWS, a district in the upper country ofSouth Carolina, having North Carolina on then. and n. e. Georgetown district on the s. e. andLynche’s creek on the s. w. which separates itfrom Camden district. Its length is about 83miles, and its breadth 63 ; and is subdivided intothe counties of Darlington, Chesterfield, and Marl-borough. By the census of 1791, there were10,706 inhabitants, of Avhich 7618 were white in-habitants, the rest slaves. It sends to the statelegislature six representatives and two senators ;and in conjunction Avith Georgetown district, onemember to congress. This district is watered byGreat Peter river and a number of smaller streams,on the banks of vdiich the land is thickly settledand Aveli cultivated. The chief towns are Green-ville and Chatham. The court-house in this dis-trict is 52 miles from Camden, as far from Lum-berton, and 90 from Georgetown. The mail stopsat this place.]

CHERIBICHE, a port of the province andgovernment of Venezuela, to the w. of the settle-ment of Guaira.

CHERIGUANES. See Chiriguanos.

CHERILLA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of its capital.

CHERINOS, a river of the province and go-

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left the government, in the year 1655, to the suc-cessor,

25. Don Martin de Muxica, knight of the orderof Santiago, a renowned officer, and one who hadgained much renown in the armies of Ital}^ andFlanders.

26. Don Pedro Porter de Casanate, A. D.1659.

27. Don Francisco Meneses Bravo de Sarabia,who led from Spain a body of troops, in order tosubdue the Indians; this he accomplished; andin the year 1664 rebuilt the cities which had beendestroyed in 1599 : his government lasted untilthe year 1668, when he was deposed by the vice-roy of Peru.

28. Don Angel Peredo, knight of the order ofSantiago ; he was appointed as an intermediategovernor upon the deposition of his antecessor,and governed during the following year, 1669.

» 29. Don Juan Enriquez, native of Lima, knightof the order of Santiago, governed until the year1677.

30. Don

31. Don

32. Don

33. Don Juan Andres de Ustariz, native of Se-villa, until the year 1715, when was elected,

34. Don Gabriel Cano dc Aponte, brigadier-general of the royal armies, in whose time theAraucanos again declared war, when he obligedthem to renew the peace ; died A.D. 1728.

35. Don Juan de Salamanca, colonel of the mi-litia of that kingdom ; he was an intermediate go-vernor, and at his death,

36. Don Joseph de Santiago Concha, Marquisde Casa Concha, kinght of the order of Calatrava,chief auditor of the royal audience of Lima, nomi-nated by the viceroy.

37. Don Alonso de Obando, Marquis de Obatido,vice-admiral of the royal armada ; appointed bythe viceroy, the Marquis de Villa Garcia, as inter-mediate successor, until the year 1736.

38. Don Joseph Manso de Velasco, Count otSnperunda, knight of the order of Santiago ; hewas at that time captain of the grenadiers of theregiment of Spanish guards, and ranked as briga-dier; well recommended by his valour and ex-ploits, when he was appointed to this presidencyin the aforesaid year ; he governed until the year1746, when he was promoted to the viceroyalty ofPeru.

39. Don Domingo Ortiz de Rozas, knight ofthe order of Santiago, was at that time governor ofBuenos Ayres, and Avas elected to this presidencyin the aforesaid year ; he founded several toAvns,

on which account the king gave him the title ofConde de Poblaciones ; governed until the year1754, when returning to Spain, he died.

40 Don Manuel Arnat y J unient, knight of theorder of San Juan, colonel of the regiment of dra-goons of Sagunto, of the rank of brigadier, ap-pointed to this presidency ; which he filled untilthe year 1761, when he was promoted to the vice-royahy of Peru.

41. Don Mateo de Toro de Zambrano y Urueta,appointed as intermediate successor by the former,upon his departure from Lima, until the arrival ofthe right successor,

42. Don Antonio Guill, formerly colonel of theregiment of infantry of Guadalaxara, and thenranked as brigadier, being governor and captain-general of the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; promotedto this presidency in the aforesaid year, 1761, andexercised it until his death, in 1768.

43. Don Mateo de Toro Zambrano y Urueta, thesecond time of his being nominated as intermediatesuccessor by the audience in the vacancy, untilwas nominated by the viceroy of Peru,

44. Don Francisco Xavier de Morales, knightof the order of Santiago, brigadier of the royalarmies, who being captain of the grenadiers of theregiment of the royal Spanish guards, was madegeneral of the militia in Peru, and Avas nominatedas intermediate successor by the viceroy to thispresidency, Avhich he enjoyed till his death in theyear 1772.

45. The aforesaid Don Mateo de Toro Zam-brano y Urueta, then Count of La Conquista, knightof the order of Santiago, and lieutenant-colonel ofthe royal armies, nominated for the third time bythe royal audience during the vacancy, until ar-rived the right successor,

46. Don Agustin de Jauregui, knight of theorder of Santiago, brigadier of the royal armies,Avho had been colonel of the regiment of dragoonsof Sagunto ; Avas appointed to this presidencyA.D. 1773, and enjoyed it until 1782, Avhen heAvas promoted to the viceroyalty of Peru.

47. Don Ambrosio de Benavides, brigadier ofthe royal armies, was nominated in the same year,1782.

[INDEX TO THE ADDITIONAL HISTORY ANDINFORMATION RESPECTING CHILE.

Chap. 1. Origin and language of the Chilians.— Conquest o f the Peruvians^ and state of Chilebefore the arrival of the Spaniards.— What werethen its political establishments^ government, andarts.

1. Language.— 2. Original state.— 3. Divided intofree and subjugated.— Agricidture.—b. Civi-

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[in case of a siege. Modern geographers speak ofit as a city not only existing in the present time,but as very stongly fortified, and the seat of abishopric, when it has been buried in ruins formore than 200 years.

4. Villarua founded. — About the same time hedispatched Alderete, one of liis officers, with 60men, to form a settlement on the shore of the greatlake J^auquaiy to which he gave the name of Vil-larica, from the great quantity of gold that hefound in its environs. In the mean time, havingreceived fresh reinforcements, he commenced hisinarch towards the s. still kept in view byliincoyan, whom timid caution constantly pre-vented from offering himself to his enemy.

5. The Clinches. — In this manner the Spanishcommander traversed, with little loss, the Avholeof Araucania from n. to s. ; but at his arrivalat the Calacalla, which separates the Arau-canians from the Cunches, he found the latter inarms determined to oppose his passage. Whilehe was deliberaling what measures to pursue, awiiman of the country, called Recloma, had theaddress to jiersuade the Cunchese general to fa-vour the strangers ; and without foreseeing theconsequences, he permitted them to pass unmo-lested. The Cunches form one of the most valiantnations of Chile : they inhabit that tract of countrywhich lies upon the sea, between the river Cala-ealla, at present called Valdivia, and the Archi-pelago of Chiloe. They are the allies of theAraiicanians, and mortal enemies to the Spaniards,and are divided into several tribes, which, likethose in the other parts of Chile, are governed bytheir respective uhnenes.

6. Valdivia founded. — The Spanish com-mander having passed the river with his troops,founded upon the southern shore the sixthcity, called Valdivia, being the first of theAmerican conquerors who sought in this man-ner to perpetuate his family name. This set-tlement, of which at present only the fortress re-mains, in a few years attained a considerable de-gree of celebrity, not only from the superior fine-ness of the golcl dug in its mines, which obtainedit the privilege of a mint, but from the excellenceof its harbour, one of the most secure and plea-sant in the S. sea. The river is very^ broad,and so deep, that ships of the line may anchorwithin a few feet of the shore ; it also forms seve-ral other harbours in the vicinity.

7. For tresses of Puren, Tucapel, and Araucobuilt. — Valdivia, satisfied with the conquests, orrather incursions, that he had made, turned back,and in repassing the provinces of I\iren, Tucapel,

and Arauco, built in each of them, in 1553, a for-tress, to secure the possession of tire others ; as hewell knew that from these provinces alone he hadto apprehend any attempt that might prove fatalto his settlements. Ercilla says, that in this expe-dition the Spaniards had to sustain many battleswith the natives ; which is highly probable, as thecontinuance of Lincoyan in command can on noother principle be accounted for. Without re-flecting upon the imprudence of occupying solarge an extent of country with so small a force,Vahlivia had the farther rashness, on his return toSantiago, to dispatch P'rancis de Aguirre, with200 men, to conquer the provinces of Cujo andTucuman, situated to the e. of the Andes.

8. Cilj/ of the Frontiers founded. — The Spanishgeneral, indefatigable in his plans of conquest, re-turned also himself to Araircania; and in theprovince of Encol founded the seventh and lastcity, in a country fertile in vines, and gave it thename of the City of the Frontiers. This name,from events which could not possibly have been inthe calculation of Valdivia, has become strictlyapplicable to its present state, as its ruins are, inreality, situated upon the confines of the Spanishsettlement in that part of Chile. It was a richand commercial city, and its wines were trans-ported to Buenos Ayres by a road over the cor-dilleras.

9. Three principal military offices instituted atConcepcion . — After having made suitable provi-sions for this colony, Valdivia returned to his fa-vourite city of Concepcion, where he institutedthe three principal military offices ; that of quar-ter-master-general, of serjeant-major, and of com-missary ; a regulation which has, till within a fewyears, prevailed in the royal army of Chile. Atpresent only two of these offices exist ; that of thequarter-master-general, who is also called the in-tendant, and resides in the city of Concepcion,and that of the serjeant-major.

10. The Toqui Caupolican. — The next toquiwho distinguished himself in the Araucanianwars, and who succeeded Lincoyan in command,was Caupolican ; he evinced a spirit of much en-terprise and cunning, and succeeded in drivingthe S])aniards from the forts of Arauco and Tuca-pel, which Avereby his orders completely destroyed.In a succeeding battle we find this commander,from the loss of a number of his men, flying inconfusion before the Spanish artillery, and suffer-ing all the horror and disgrace attendant upon anapparent defeat, when, in a momentous crisis, ayoung Araucanian, called Lautaro, whom Valdi-via in one of his incursions had taken prisoner,]

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- fS7. Suppression of the tribunal o f audience. — In1575’ the tribunal of audience was* suppressed, asit is asserted, on the sole principle of economy, andRodrigo Quiroga was reinstated in the governmentby order of Philip II. This experienced olhcer,having received a reinforcement of 2000 men fromSpain, gave directions to his father-in-law, RuizGamboa, to found a new colony at the foot of thecordilleras, between the cities of Santiago andConcepcion, which has since received the appella-tion of Chilian, from the river on whose shore itstands, and has become the captial of the fertileprovince of that name. Shortly after the establish-ment of this settlement, in 1589, the governor diedat a very advanced age, having nominated Gamboaas his successor. The three years of Gamboa’sgovernment were occupied on one side in opposingthe attempts of Paynenancu, the then existingtoqui, and on the other in repelling the Pehuen-ches and Chiquillanians, Avho, instigated by theAraucanians, had begun to molest the Spanish set-tlements.

38. Description of the Pehuenches. — The Pe-huenches form a numerous tribe, and inhabit thatpart of the Chilian Andes lying between lat. 34°and 37° s. to the e. of the Spanish ])rovinces ofCalchagua, Maule, Chilian, and Huilquilemu.Their dress is no way difl’erent from that of theAraucanians, except that instead of drawers orbreeches, they Avear around the waist a piece ofcloth like the Japanese, which falls down to theirknees. Their boots or shoes are all ot one piece,and made from the skin of the hind leg of an oxtaken ofi’ at the knee ; this they fit to the foot whilegreen, turning the hair within, and sewing up oneof the ends, the skin of the knee serving for theheel. These shoes, from being Avorn, and oftenrubbed Avith tallow, become as soft and pliable asthe best dressed leather. Although these moun-taineers have occasionally shown themselves to bevaliant and hardy soldiers, they are neverthelessfond of adorning and decorating themselves likewomen. They wear ear-rings and bracelets ofglass beads upon their arms ; they also ornamenttheir hair with the same, and suspend little Ivellsaround their heads. Notwithstanding they havenumerous herds of cattle and sheep, tlieir usualfood is horse-flesh, which, like the Tartars, tlieyprefer to any other ; but, more delicate than thatpeople, they eat it only Avhen boiled or roasted.They dwell in the manner of the Redouin Arabs,in tents made of skins, disposed in a circular form,leaving in the centre a spacious field, where theircattle feed during the continuance of the herbage.When that begins to fail, they transjAort themselves

to another situation, and in this manner, continu-ally changing place, they traverse the valleys of thecordilleras. Each village or encampmeirt is go-verned by an ulmen or hereditary prince. Intheir language and religion they differ not from tlieAraucanians. They are fond of hunting, andoften, in pursuit of game, traverse the immenseplains Avhich lie between the great riv^r of Plataand the straits of Magellan. These excursions theysometimes extend as far as Buenos Ayres, andplunder the country in the vicinity. They fre-quently attack the caravans of merchandize goingfrom thence to Chile ; and so successful have theybeen in their enterprises, that, owing to that cause,the commerce in that quarter Avas once almost en-tirely stopped, though very lately resumed Avitli a to-lerable degree of A'igour. They have, nevertheless,for many years abstained from committing hostilitieswithin the Chilian boundaries in time of peace ;induced either by the advantages which they de-rive from the trade with the inhabitants, or fromthe fear of being roughly handled by them. Theirfavourite Aveapon is the laqve, Avhich they alwayscarry with them fastened to their girdles. It isvery probable that the ten Americans conductedby the valiant Orellana, of Avhose amazing couragemention is made in Lord Anson’s voyage, were ofthis tribe. Notwithstanding their wandering andrestless disposition, these people are the most in-dustrious and commercial of any of the savages.When in their tents they are never idle. The avo-men Aveave cloths of various colours : the menoccupy themselves in making baskets and a varietyof beautiful articles of Avood, feathers, or skins,Avhich are highly prized by their neighbours. Theyassemble every year on the Spanish frontiers, Avherethey hold a kind of fair, which usually conti-nues for 15 or 20 days. Hither they bring fos-sil salt, gypsum, pilch, bed-coverings, ponchos,skins, woo], bridle-reins beautifully wrought ofplaited leather, baskets, wooden vessels, feathers,ostrich eggs, horses, cattle, and a variety of otherarticles ; and receive in exchange wheat, Avine,and the manufactures of Europe. They are veryskilful in traffic, and can with difficulty be over-reached. Eor fear of being plundered by thosewho believe every thing is lawful against infidels,they never all drink at the same time, but separatetiiemsch'es into several companies ; and Avhilesomekeep guard, the others indulge themsehms in thepleasures of Avine. They are generally humane,complacent, lovers of justice, and possess all thosegood qualities that are produced or perfected bycommerce.

39. Description of the Chiquillanians. — The]3 I 2

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[had been deserted for more than 40 years, wherethey intended to form an establishment in order toconquer the rest of the kingdom. With this viewthey immediately began building three strong fortsat the entrance of the river, in order to secure itspossession. The Araucanians were invited, withthe most flattering promises, to join them ; this theynot only declined, but strictly adhering to the sti-pulations of the treaty, refused to furnish them withprovisions, of which tliey were greatly in want.The Cunchese, to whom the territory which theyhad occupied belonged, following the counsel oftheir allies, refused also to treat with them or sup-ply them. In consequence of this refusal, theDutch, pressed with hunger, and hearing tliat acombined army of Spaniards and Araucanians wereon their march against them, were compelled toabandon the ])lace in three months aftertheir land-ing. The Marquis de Mancura, son to the vice-roy of Pern, having soon after arrived there insearch of them, with 10 ships of war, fortified theharbour, and particulary the island, which hassince borne the titular name of his family. Onthe termination of the sixth year of his govern-ment, Baydes was recalled by the court, and DonMartin IVluxica appointed in his place.

51. Dreadful earthquake.— lAa succeeded inpreserviiijr the kingdom in that state of tranquil-lity in which he found it, no other commotion oc-curring during his government, but that producedby a violent earthquake, which, on the 8th of May1617, destroyed part of the city of St. Jago.The fortune of his successor, Don vVntonio Acugna,was very dift'erent. During his government thewar was excited anew between the Spaniards andAraucanians ; but contemporary writers have leftus no accounts of the causes that produced it,Clentaru, the hereditaiy toqui of Lauquemapu,being, in 1655, unanimously elected general, sig-nalized his first campaign bj’ the total defeat ofthe Spanish army. He, moreover, continued topersecute the Spaniards with great violence for aperiod of 10 years, under the governments of DonPedro Portel Casanate, and Don Francisco Me-neses. The last, who was a Portuguese l)y birth,had the glory of terminating it, in 1665, by a peacemore permanent than that made by Baydes. Allthe succeeding governors appear to have kept upa good understanding witli the Araucanians untilthe year 1686, when Garro was nearly breaking it,on occasion of removing tlie inhabitants of theisland of Mocho to the ?z. shore of the Biobib,iti order to cut off all communication with foreignenemies.

^ 52. Commerce zeilh the French.~T\\Q com-

mencement of the present aera was marked in Chileby the deposition of the Governor Doi^ FranciscoIbanez, the rebellion of the inhabitants of Chiloe,and the trade with the French. The islandersof Chiloe were soon restored to obedience, throughthe prudent conduct of the quarter-master-generalof the kingdom, Don Pedro Molina, who succeededin reducing them rather by mild measures than byuseless victories. The French, in consequence ofthe war of the succession, possessed themselvesfor a time of all tlie external commerce of Chile.From 1707 to 1717, its ports were filled with theirships, and they carried from thence incrediblesums in gold and silver. It w as at this period thatthe learned F'ather Feuille, whoremained there threeyears, made his botanical researches and meteorolo-gical observations upon the coast. His amiable quali-ties obtained him the esteem of the inhai)itants, whostill cherish his memory with much affection. Itw'as in 1722 that the Araucanians, impatient atthe insolence of those who were designated by thetitle of captains of the friends ; and who having"'been introduced under pretence of guarding themissionaries, arrogated to themselves a species ofauthority over the natives, resolved to create atoqui, and have recourse to arms. A war in con-sequence ensued, but it soon became reduced tolittle skirmishes, which were finally terminated bytlie celebrated peace of Negrete, a place situatedat the confluence of the rivers Biobio and Lara,where the treaty of Quillan was reconfirmed, andthe odious title of captain of friends wholly abo-lished.

53. How the Pehuenches became inimical tothe Spaniards. Governor Gonzaga was thenext Avho excited the flames of war by endeavour-ing to effect more than his predecessors. He un-dertookto compel the Araucanians to live in cities.This chimerical scheme was ridiculed by thosewho knew the prejudices of tiiis people, and it wasfinally abandoned, not, however, till it had pro-cured another powerful, and for ever after impla-cable enemy to the Spaniards. Tiiis was no otherthan the Peliuenches, avIio being in the above warin alliance with (he Spaniards, and who sufiered aconsiderable defeat whilst fighting against theAraucanians, resolved all at once to'change sides,and have ever since been the firm allies of the lat-ter. They have a practice of attacking the Spa-nish caravans from Buenos Ayres to Chile, andevery year furnishes some melancholy inforinationof that kind. We shall not proceed particularlyto notice several actions, and among others abloody battle wdiich was fougiit in tlie beginning ofthe year 1773 ; mention of which was made in t1iel

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[their masters, tliat the greatest punishment inflictedon them would be to sell them to others. Mastersnevertheless exercise the rights of fathers of fami-lies over their slaves, in correcting them for theirfaults.

12. Internal and external commerce, mines,imports, and exports. — The internal commerce ofChile has been hitherto of very little importance,notwithstanding the advantages that the countryoffers for its encouragement. Its principal source,industry, or more properly speaking, necessity, iswanting. An extensive commerce is correlativewith a great population, and in proportion as thelatter increases, the former will also be augmented.Hitherto it may be said, that of the two branchesthat in general give birth to commerce, agricultureand industry, the first is that alone which animatesthe internal: commerce of Chile, and even thatpart of the external which is carried on with Peru.The working of mines also occupies the attentionof many in the provinces of Copiapo, Coquimbo,and Quillota ; but the industry is so trifling thatit does not deserve the name. Notwithstanding theabundance of its fruits and materials of manufacture,as flax, wool, hemp, skins and metals, which mightproduce a flourishing commerce, it is conductedbut languidly. The’inhabitants employ themselvesonly in making ponchos, stockings, socks, carpets,blankets, skin-coats, saddles, hats, and other smallarticles chiefly made use of by the common orpoorer class of people, since those of the middlerank employ those of European manufacture.These, but more particularly the sale of hides andtanned leather, which they have in great plenty,with that of grain and wine, form the whole of theinternal commerce of the kingdom. The external,which is carried on with all the ports of Peru, par-ticularly Callao, arises from the exportation offruits ; this amounts to 700,000 dollars annually,according to the statements given in the periodicalpublications at Lima. The commerce betweenChile and Buenos Ayres is quite otherwise, sincefor the herb of Paraguaj/ dXone, it is obliged to ad-vance 300,000 dollars annually in cash ; theother articles received from thence are probablypaid for by those sent thither. In the trade withSpain, the fruits received from Chile go but a littleway in payment of more than a million of dollars,which are received from thence annually in Euro-pean goods, either directly, or by the way ofBuenos Ayres, and sometimes from Lima. Gold,silver, and copper, are the articles which formnearly the whole of this commerce, since the hidesand vicuna wool are in such small quantities as torender them of little importance.

Notwithstanding theworkingofthe mines in Chilehas in a great measure been relinquished from theex-pence,and from the impediments offered by the war-like spirit of the Araucanians, there are more than athousand now in work between the cities of Co-quimbo and Copiapo, besides those of the provinceof Aconcagua ; and it is a matter of fact that theproduce of its mines has been increasing eversince that the passage into the S. sea by cape Hornwas frequented by the Spanish merchants. Thegold coined in the capital was lately regulated at5200 marks annually ; but the present yearly pro-duce of the mines, as calculated from the amountsof the royal duties, and therefore considerablyunder the truth, amounts to 10,000 Spanish marksof pure gold, and 29,700 do. of pure silver. Thevalue in dollars of both is 1,737,380; the goldbeing estimated at 145i*#^ dollars, and the silverat 9 t'V dollars the Spanish mark. Besides^ this, wemust add for contraband 322,620 dollars ; andthe total produce will then be 2,060,000. Accord-ing to liumboldt, the dollars imported into Chileand Peru in 1803 amounted to 11,500,000, andthe exports consisted of produce to the value of4,000,000 dollars, besides 8,000,000 dollars inspecie. The receipts of Chile, Guatemala, and Ca-racas, are consumed within the country. The re-mittances of gold and silver to Spain are usuallymade from Buenos Ayres ; the first being lessbulky, is carried by the monthly packets insums of 2 or 3000 ounces ; as to the second,it has, till within a very late period, been sent intwo convoy ships in the summer, by which con-veyances gold is also remitted. The copper whichis extracted from the mines is estimated from 8to 10,000 quintals. From these data it will notbe difficult to form a general estimate of all thatChile produces annually. A communication bywater, which greatly facilitates the progress ofcommerce, has been already commenced. In se-veral of the ports, barks are employed in the trans-portation of merchandize, which was before carriedby land upon mules. Several large ships havealso been built in the harbour of Concepcion andthe mouth of the river Maule. The external com-merce is carried on with Peru and Spain. In thefirst, 23 or 24 ships, of 5 or 600 tons each, are em-ployed, which are partly Chilian and partly Peru-vian. These usually make three voyages in ayear; they carry from Chile wheat, wine, pulse,almonds, nuts, cocoa-nuts, conserves, dried meat,tallow, lard, cheese, sole-leather, timber for build-ing, copper, and a variety of other articles, andbring back in return silver, sugar, rice and cotton.The Spanish ships receive in exchange for Euro-1

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the river Marailon has its rise in tins lake ; its realorigin being in the lake Lauricociia, as may beseen under that article.

CHINCHERO, a settlement of the provinceand correghniado of Calca y Lares in Perú. Thecemetery of its church is composed of some large,thick Avails of Avrouglit stone, well fitted together,and having in them certain niches similar to sentryboxes ; so that they appear as having formerly be-longed to some fortress.

Same name, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas in the same king-dom.

Same name, a lake in the province of Cuzco,five leagues distant from this city.

CHINCHILCA, as otherswill have it, a river of the district of Guadalabquien and kingdom of Chile ; it runs n. n. w. andenters the river Callacalla.

CHINCHIPE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito.

Same name, a river of this province, whichrises from the mountain desert or paramo of La Sabanilla. It Avashes the city and territory of Val-ladolid, and on its c. side receives the rivers Nnm-balla, Vergel, Patacones, Sangalla, San Francisco,and Nambacasa ; and on its zs. side those of Pa-landa, Simanchi, Namballe, and Guancabamba ;when, being sAA'^elled to a considerable size by all ofthese, it enters the Maranon on the n. shore, to thew. w. of the settlement of Tompenda.

CHINCHIRU, a large lake of the province andcorregimiento of Cuzco in Peru, from whence it liestwo leagues to the n.

CHINCHULAGUA, a very lofty desert mountainor paramo, covered with eternal snow, in theprovince and corregimiento of Tacunga in thekingdom of Quito. It lies five leagues to the n. ofTacunga, Avith a slight inclination to the n. c.

CHINCONTLA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of Olintla, and alcaldia mayor of Zacatlan,in Nueva Espana ; situate in a delightful defile ornarroAV tract, watered by various rivers. Eightleagues from its head settlement.

CHINCOTEAG, a small island near the coastof the N. sea, in the province and colony of Maryland,between the Cedar isle and the river Si-wanscut.

CHINGA, a fortress of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada; one of the six Avhich were held by the%ipas or kings of Bogota, against the Punches na-tion, who border upon their country ; 10 leaguesto the s. w. of Bogota.

CHINGOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Gongor.

CHINI, a small island of the S. sea; situateclose to the coast of the province and governmentof Costarica in the kingdom of Guatemala, withinthe gulf ofNicoya, and in the innermost part of it.

CHINIJO, a settlement of the missions whichAvere held by the religious order of St. Augustin,in the country of the Gran Paititi, of the provinceand corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHINIPAS, a settlement of the missions of theprovince and government of Cinaloa.

Same name, some sierras of this province.

CHINGUINTILEA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huamanga in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Aneo.

CHINU, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cartagena in the kingdom ofTierraFirme ; founded in the sahanas, and formed by are-union of other settlements, in 1776, by the G'o-A^ernor Uon Juan Piraiento.

CHIPACO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huamalies in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chavin de Pariarca.

CHIPALO, a river of the province and governmentof Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ;one of those Avhich enter the great river Mag-dalena.

CHIPALZINGO, a settlement and head ettlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tixtlanin Nueva Espana. It contains 353 families ofIndians, and of Spaniards, Mustces, and Mn-lattoes, and lies three leagues from the sett lemcn!,of Zurnpango.

CHIPAN, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Lucanas in Peru.

CHIPANGA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Quixos and Macas in the kingdom oiQuito. It rises in the sierra, Avhich divides thedistrict of Macas from the province of Mainas, runsfrom n. to s. and enters the Morona.

CHIPAQUE, a settlement of the corregimientoof Ubaque in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a mild temperature, and abounds in fruits andseeds peculiar to a warm climate. It consists of150 housekeepers, and of as many Indians. It isso infested with snakes, that it is impossible to findany part of it clear of them. Eight leagues .9. .of Santa Fe, in the road which leads to San Juande los Llanos.

CHIPASAQUE, a settlement of the corregimiento of Guatavita in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.It is of an hot temperature, lying 24 leagues to thes. e. of Santa Fe, and close to the settlement ofChaqueta, in the road Avhich leads to San Juan dc

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papas; likewise in cattle, from the fleeces of whichgreat quantities of woven clotlis are made. Its'population amounts to 150 house-keepers and 100Indians. Four leagues to the s. w. of its capital,and near to the settlement of Turmeque.

CHIROBIO, a river of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela. It runs e. and enters thesea opposite the island Tarata.

CHIRTA, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Chachapoyas in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Yambrasbamba.

CHIRU, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorand jurisdiction of Penonome in the kingdom andgovernment of Tierra Firme ; situate on the shoreof the S. sea, upon an extensive plain.

Same name, a river of this jurisdiction, which risesin the mountains of Penonome, and enters the S.sea near the settlement of Anton.

Same name, a very small island of the same juris-diction, close upon the coast, and called El Fa-rallon.

CHISAHALO, a settlement of theprovince and corregimienlo of Tacunga in thekingdom of Quito.

==CHISCAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate at the foot of the Snowy sierra^and therefore of a cold and unpleasant temperature.Its productions correspond with those of a similarclimate ; it contains about 80 Indians, with a veryfew whites. Thirty-two leagues n. e. of Tunja.

CHISGAS, Paramo de, a very lofty mountain covered with eternal snow, in the provinceand government of San Juan de los Llanos of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, between the riversApure and Sinaruco.

CHISLOCA, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Chichas and Tarija in Peru ; be-longing to the district of the former. It is annexedto the curacy of Tupisa.

CHISME, a settlement of the head settlementof Puxmecatan, and alcaldia mayor of Villalta.It contains 71 families of Indians, and lies 18leagues from its capital.

CHISPAS, Punta de las, a point on the s.coast and w. head of the island of St. Domingo,in the territory possessed by the French ; lyingbetween the settlement and parish of the English,and the point of Burgados.

CHISQUE, a settlement of the province andcorregimienlo of Canta in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Atabillos Altos.

CHISQUILLA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimienlo of Chachapoyas in Peru.

[CHISSEL, a fort in the state of Tennessee,two miles and a half from English ferry, on Newriver, 43 from Abingdon, and 107 from Longisland, on Holston.]

CHITA, a province and corregimienlo of theNuevo Reyno de Granada, and vice-royalty ofSanta Fe. It was formerly called Chisca. It isbounded w. by the province of Bogota, and n. bythe country bt the Laches Indians, or province ofCochuy, and e. and s. by the llanuras of theOrinoco. It was discovered by George Spira, aGerman, and he was the first who entered it withhis companions in 1535. This territory is fertile,abounds in wheat and maize, the grain of which isextremely large, as also in other seeds, and hasgoats and neat cattle in plenty. It is of an hotand unhealthy temperature, and has palms similarto those of Palestine and Barbary, producing ex-cellent dates. The capital is of the same name.This is situate at the foot of the mountains of Bo-gota ; it is a large settlement, and was formerly en-titled a city. Its inhabitants consist of upwardsof 700 whites and about 200 Indians. Twenty-four leagues to the n. e. of Tunja.

Same name, another settlement, which is the headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofVillalta in Nueva Espana. It is of a mild tempe-rature, contains 90 families of Indians, and is threeleagues and a half to the s. of its capital.

CHITAGA, Punta de, a bridge in the province and government of Merida, to the s. ofthe city of Pamplona, and upon the river of thisname.

CHITANOS, a barbarous nation of Indians;bounded by that of the Chiscas, but distinct fromit, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. They in-habit the woods to the n. e. of the mountains ofBogota and the shores of the rivers Ele, Cuiloto,and Arauca ; are an intractable and. cruel people,and dreaded by all their neighbours. In 1535,having joined company with the Jiraras, theytook and destroyed the city of Las Palmas.

CHITARAQUE, a settlement of the corregi-mienlo and jurisdiction of Velez in the NuevoReyno de Granada, it is of an hot but healtliytemperature, produces yucas, maize, plantains,cotton, and great quantities of sugar, from whichare made fine and much esteemed conserves.

CHITAREROS, a barbarous and brutal nation of Indians of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada,who inhabit the mountains in the vicinity of Pam-plona ; they are mixed with some families of theLaches. This nation is extremely numerous, andpass a wandering life without any fixed abode ;they go entirely naked, and are much given to sen-sual gratifications ; some of them have embraced2

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down from the mountains to the jy. of the RachcsIndians, and runs 52 leagues from s. to «. e. untilit enters the Marmore together with the Guapaix,opposite the settlement and reduccion of Loreto,which lies to the s.

CHOPO, a settlement of the government andjurisdiction of Pamplona in the JNuevo Reyno deGranada. It is of a very mild climate, andabounds in sugar-canes, plantains, maize, and manysorts of vegetables ; these being the principal branchof its trafiic with the Indians, Avho carry them forsale to the capital, which lies at a small distancefrom hence, in the road leading to M6rida andGibraltar. It contains 50 Indians, and almost asmany indigent settlers.

[CHOPS, The, in Kennebeck river, are threemiles from Swan Island; Avhich see.]

CHOPTANK, a large navigable river of theprovince and colony of Maryland, [emptying it-self into Chesapeak bay.]

CHOPTANK, Little, another (river) of the same pro-vince Maryland. It runs w. and enters the sea in the bay ofChesapeak.

CHOQUE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatarabo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Acros.

CHOQUECAMATA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregtmiento of Cochabamba in Peru.

CHOQUELIMPE, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Arica in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Copia.

CHOQUES, a barbarous nation of Caribes Indians,of the Nuevo Reino de Granada, dwellingimmediately upon the mountains and forests ofFosca. They are ferocious and cruel, and pitchtheir huts near the river Bermejo. But little isknown of their customs and of their country.

CHORAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huamalies in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Jesus.

CHOROMA, a settlement of the province andcorrregimiento of Chichas and Tarija, in the dis-trict of the former, and annexed to the curacy ofTupisa.

CHOROMOROS, a barbarous nation of Indians of Peru, who formerly occupied the plainsor llanuras of Calchaqui towards the ??. ; touchingtoAvards the e. upon the source of the river Mogo-les, and extending n. as far as the mountains ofthe Lules, and w. as far as the Andes. They areat present reduced to the Catholic religion, and aremixed with those of other nations ; but some fewof them still persist in their idolatry, and livedispersed upon the mountains.

CHORONI, a port of the coast of the kingdomof Tierra Firme, in the province and governmentof Venezuela, between the mountain of Ocumaraand the port of Chuapo.

CHOROS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Coquimbo in the kingdom ofChile. It has the hard lot of being scantily sup-plied Avith Avater, even as much as is necessary lordrinking.

Same name, a point of the coast of this provinceand kingdom (Chile).

Same name, an island near the coast and point ofits name (Choros),

CHORRERA, a settlement of the jurisdictionand akaldia mayor of Nata in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate near the coast of the S.sea.

Same name, a creek of the island of Cuba, onthe 71. coast, having a fort for its protection, witha detacliment of troops from the Havana.

CHORILLO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru.

Same name, another (settlement), in the province and corregimento of Cercado in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Surco.

CHORRILLOS, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cañete in Peru; situate onthe coast, close to the point of China.

CHORROS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the kingdom of Quito.

CHORROU, Chike du, a rivulet and establishmentof the French, in their possessions inGuayana.

CHORUNGA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Condesuyos de Arequipa in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Andaray ; situate in thevalley of its name.

CHOSAPACK, a large andbeautiful bay on the coast of the province and colony of Virginia]]. [See Chesapeak.]

CHOSCHAMA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Huacaiia.

[CHOSCUMUS, a fort of the province andgovernment of Buenos Ayres, near a small lakeabout 20 leagues s. e. of Buenos Ayres, in Lat. 35°33' 40^. Long. 38° 2' 15" 20 .]

CHOTA, Todos Santos de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxamarca inPeru.

[Chota, a valley of the Andes, which, thoughonly two miles Avide, is nearly a mile in depth.It Avas passed by Humboldt and his companions,in 1801, on tlreir way to Quito, Avhen they foundits temperature to be intensely sultry.]

3 N

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of Key in Brazil. It runs s. and turning e. en-ters the lake Mini.

Same name, a settlement of this province (Rey) ; situate onthe sea-coast, and lying between this and the lakeMini.

CHUIGOTES. See Chiugotob.

CHUILLE, a river of the province and go-vernment ot Darien in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It has its source in the mountains towardsthe e. runs n. e. and enters the river Tarena.

CHUIRIEUI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay. It runs n. and enters theIguy near the mission of San Miguel.

CHULK, a small port or creek of the coast ofthe S. sea, in the province and corregimiento ofArequipa. It is shallow, insecure, and exposedto the ,v. w. winds.

==CHULIHUCANI, a settlement of tlie province and government of Potosiin Peru.

CHULINA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Charazani.

CHULISANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Cachi.

CHULUMANI, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Cicasica in Peru.

Same name, a river of the above province (Cicasica),which rises at the end of the cordillera of Ancuma,begins its course to the e. and forming a large bendtowards the n. enters the Beni just at its source,and where it keeps the name of the Chuquiavo.

CHUMA, a river of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, which flows down from the mountains ofBogota. It waters the territory of Merida, pass-ing opposite the city, and enters through the s.side into the lake of Maracaybo.

Same name, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHUMATLAN, a settlement of the head settle-nidnt of Zozocoles, and alculdia mayor of Papantla,in Nueva Espana. It is situate at the top of anhigli mountain, and from it may be seen all the set-tlements belonging to this jurisdiction. Its popu-lation amounts to 183 families of Indians, and itlies to the n. of its head settlement, three leaguesdistant from this, and 14 from the capital.

CHUMBE, a village of the province and corre-gimiento of Cuenca in the kingdom of Quito. Itis to the xd. of Tarqui, and on the w. shore of oneof the torrents rising in fhe river Paute. Not farfrom it are some excellent hot baths, of which nouse is made. LHere the stately melastoma and theembothriuin are growing at an elevation of 12,000feet, according to Humboldt, who visited this vil-lage in 1802. Lat. 3° 10' s.]

CHUMBES, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Vilcas Huaman in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Vizchongo.

CHUMBI, a settlement of the province and cor-of Parinacochas in Peru, where thereis a pious sanctuary, with an excellent painting ofthe blessed virgin, said to have been given by apontitf to the curate of this settlement when he wasat Rome.

CHUMBICHA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tucuman in Peru; situate to thew. of the valley of San Fernando de Cata-inarca.

CHUMBICOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Piura in Peru ; situate on theshore of a small river of the same name.

CHUMBILLA, a mountain of the province andcorregimiento of Huamanga in Peru ; celebratedfor a rich silver mine. It lies three leagues froma small settlement called Canaria, which is at pre-sent abandoned and deserted.

CHUMBIVILCAS, a province and corregi-miento of Peru. It is bounded n. by the provinceof Quispicanchialgo, and by that of Chilquesand Masques on the n. w. ; by those of Cota-bamba and Aymaraez on the jr. ; by that of Con-dcsuyos de Arequipa on the s . ; and on the e. bythat of Canes and Cauches. Its temperature isfor the most part cold, although in some placestemperate, so that it produces the fruits peculiar toeither climate ; such as wheat, barley, maize, pa-pas, and other seeds, though none in abundance,but plenty of neat cattle. In this province arefound the lofty and vast snowy mountains calledCondesuyos del Cuzco. It lies on the boundariesof the province of Parinacocha, being separatedfrom it by the river which flows down from theprovince of Camana. Here much cloth peculiarto the country is manufactured ; and in its districtare many mouths of gold and silver mines, themounds and pits of which, together with the re-mains of several mills for working metal, indicatethat in former times they were probably worked tono small advantage. They gather here a greatquantity of Cochineal, which is called macno, withwhich cloths are dyed of very fine colours. Ithas likewise fountains and mineral streams of hotwater, and is subject to earthquakes. Its reparti-mento used to amount to 85,800 dollars, and its al-cavala to 685 dollars per annum. Its inhabitants,including the district of Condesuyos, amount to16,000 souls, who live in the 22 following set-tlements :

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territory, where the noble families of Loxa havetheir best possessions.

CHUQUIS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huamalies in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Bailos.

CHUQUISACA, La Plata,a city and capital of the province of Peru, foundedby Pedro Anzures in 1539, who gave it this name.It had a settlement of Indians on the same spot.The first founders called it La Plata, from thecelebrated mine of this metal (silver) in the moun-tain of Porco, close to the aforesaid settlement,and from whence immense wealth was extractedby the emperors the Jncas of Peru. This city issituate on a plain surrounded by pleasant hills,which defend it from the inclemency of the winds ;the climate is mild and agreeable, but during thewinter, dreadful tempests, accompanied with thun-der and lightning, are not unusual ; the edificesare good, handsome, and well adorned, havingdelightful orchards and gardens. The waters aredelicate, cold, and salutary, and divided intodifferent aqueducts, by which they are carried tothe public fountains, forming an object at onceuseful and ornamental. Its nobility is of the firstand most distinguished families of Peru, who havemany privileges and distinctions. The cathedralconsists of three naves ; it is very rich, and adorn-ed with fine furniture and beautiful paintings.It contains convents of the religious orders of St.Domingo, St. Augustin, St. Francis, La Merced,and San Juan de Dios, with a good hospital, ahandsome college and a magnificent church whichbelonged to the regulars of the company ; alsothree monasteries of nuns, the one of Santa Clara,the other of Santa Monica, and the third of theCarmelites ; a royal university with the title ofSan Francisco Xavier, the rector of which wasuniversally of the college of the regulars of thecompany of the Jesuits. It has also two housesof study for youth, the one the seminary of SanChristoval, and the other the college of San Juan,which were likewise under the controul of theJesuits until the year 1767 ; also an hermitage de-dicated to San Roque. It was erected into abishopric by the pontiff Julius III. in 1551, andafterwards into a metropolitan in 1608, with anarchbishop, five dignitaries, six canons, four pre-bends, and as many more demi-prebends. Thetribunal of audience was erected here in 1559, andafterwards those of the inquisition of the cruzada.Its arms are a shield divided horizontally, havingin the upper part two mountains with a cross uponeach, in the middle a tree with two columns on thesides, in the lower part to the left two lions rampant,

on the right two towers with two lions, a standardbeing in the middle, and the whole embossedupon a silver field. At the distance of six leaguesfrom this city passes the river Pilcoraayu, bywhich it is supplied with good fish, and upon theshores of the Cachimayu, which is only twoleagues distant, the nobility have many rural seats.In 1662 a great insurrection took place hereamongst the Mustees and the people of colour.It is the native place of several illustrious persons,and amongst others of the following :

Don Rodrigo de Orozco, Marquis of Mortara,captain-general of the principality of Cataluna,and of the council of state and war.

Fra}/ Antonio de Calancha, a monk of St. Au-gustin, a celebrated author.

Don Rodrigo de Santillana, oidor of Valladolid,and afterwards in his country.

The venerable Friar Martin de Aguirre, of theorder of St. Augustin.

Don Alonso Corveda de Zarate, canon of Lima,and professor of languages.

The Father Maestro Diego Trexo, a Do-minican monk.

The Father Juan de Cordoba, of the extin-guished company of Jesuits, a celebrated theo-logist.

Its archbishopric has for suffragans, the bishop-rics of Santa (3ruz de la Sierra, La Paz, Tucu-man, and La Ascencion of Paraguay ; and to itsdiocese belong 188 curacies. Its inhabitants inand about it amount to 13,000, of which 4000 areSpaniards, 3000 Mustees, 4500 Indians, and 15,000Negroes and Mulattoes. It is 290 leagues fromCuzco, in lat. 19° 31' s.

Archbishops of the church of La Plata.

1. Don Frau Tomas de San Martin, a monk ofthe order of St. Dominic, a master in his order,and one of the first monks who passed over intoPeru with the Friar Vicente de Valverde; he W 2 isprovincial there, returned to Spain with the Licen-tiate Pedro de la Gasca, and as a reward for hislabours, presented by the king to the first arch-bishopric of Charcas, in 1553: he died in 1559.

2. Don Fraj/ Pedro de la Torre, who waselected, but not consecrated ; and in his place,

3. Don Fray Alonso de la Cerda.

4. Don Fernan Gonzalez de la Cuesta, who laidthe foundation of the cathedral church.

5. Don Fray Domingo de Santo Tomas, of theorder of St. Dominic, a noted preacher, and one ofthose who went over to Peru with the Fray VicenteValverde ; he was prior in different convents, andgeneral visitor of his order in those kingdoms.

6. Don Fernando de Santillana, native of Se-

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