LatAm Digital Edition and Gazetteer

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

Search for Chumbivilcas* CHUMBIVILCAS*

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

22

22

A I A

AIANABE, a settlement of Indians of S. Caro-lina, situate on the shore of the river Buffle-noir.

AIAPANGO, the head settlement of the districtof the akaldia mayor of Chaleo in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 100 families of Indians, and isannexed to the curacy of Amecaraeca, at twoleagues to the s. of its capital.

AIAPATA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carabaya in Peru, and veryopulent, on account of its silver mines. The sandson the banks of the rivers here have been known sorichly impregnated with this metal, that lumps ofit have been at different times picked up. It is themost considerable population in the province, andthe temperature is so salutary, that it is very com-mon to meet with persons of 90 years of age, andmany also of 100.

AIAPEL, a town of the province and govern-ment of Antioquia, in the new kingdom of Gra-nada, situate on the bank of a large lake or swampof the same name, and which is formed from thewaters of the rivers Cauca, San Jorge, and others.In its district are the lavaderos, or washing placesfor gold, of La Cruz, San Mateo, Thuansi, Can,Ure, Man, San Pedro, and La Soledad.

AIARANGA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chancay in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Paccho.

AIARI, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Huanta in Peru, annexed to the cu-racy of Mayoc.

AIATA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

AIATASTO, a large river of the province andgovernment of Tucuman, in the district and juris-diction of the city of Salta, on the banks of whichare some pasture grounds of the same name, uponwhich are fed 40,000 head of neat cattle, and 6000of horses for breeding.

AIATEPEC, a settlement of the head settlementof the district of Atitlan, and alcaldia mayor ofVillalta, in Nueva España. It contains 45 fami-lies of Indians, and is 17 leagues from its capital.

AIAUl, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Castro Virreyna in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Huaitara.

AIAUIRI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Lamoa in Peru. In its vicinity aresome forts, which were built by the Indians in thetime of their gentilism, and now in a state of greatdilapidation. There is a lake of warm water here,the bottom of which has never yet been found.The water always keeps at one height, so that it ispresumed that it finds its way out through somesubterraneous channel. There is also another warm

AIM

water spring at two leagues distance, which is verynoxious, and, as it runs, has the property of petri-fying, in like manner as the spring of water inGuancavelica.

Aiauiri, another settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Yauyos in Peru.

AIAUTLA, a settlement of the head settlementof the district of the alcaldia mayor of Teutila inNueva España, of a warm temperature, and inha-bited by 100 Indian families, who support them-selves by cultivating and selling the vaynilla plant.Nine leagues s. of its capital.

AICAROPA, a small river Of the province andgovernment of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises in the country of the Armocotos Indians, runsfrom e. to w. with a slight inclination to the s. andenters the Caura.

AICHES, a settlement of Indians of the provinceand government of Las Texas, in Nueva España,sitzate in the way which leads to Mexico.

AICIACHIA, a settlement of the missions whichbelonged to the Jesuits, in the province of Tarau-mara and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya, 40 leaguesw. s. w. of the town and real of the mines of Chi-guagua.

AIECTIPAC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district of Yxteapan, and alcaldiamayor of Tlapa, in Nueva España. It contains21 Indian families, and is three leagues e. of itshead settlement.

AIENCAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cuenca, in the kingdom of Quito,annexed to the curacy of Paccha.

AIGA, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Huailas in Peru.

AIGAME, a settlement and real of mines ofthe province and government of Sonora in NuevaEspana.

==AILES, a river of the province and governmentof Louisiana. It runs s, e. between the rivers Canotand Noyre, and empties itself into the Mississippi.

AIMARAEZ, a province and corregimiento ofPeru, bounded n. w. and w. by the province ofAndahuailas, of the bishopric of Guamanga, s. byParinacocha of the same, s. e. by Ghumbivilcas,and e. by Cotabamba. It is 40 leagues in lengthfrom «. to s. and 26 in width from e. to ti). includ-ing in its figure on the w. side the last mentionedprovince. It js one of the most uneven soils in thekingdom, being full of lofty sierras and snowymountains. It is on this account that its climate isvery cold, excepting, however, in some vallies,where it is more temperate, and where, on somesmall sloping grounds, the inhabitants sow seed andgrain, and cultivate fruit trees and cane plantations,

Last edit over 1 year ago by MJG
443

CHI

C H I

443

mines have as yet been discovered here. Theseislands have some ports, but such as are small, in-secure, and without any defence, with the excep-tion of that of Chacao. The inhabitants shouldamount to 22,000 souls, and these are dividedinto 4 1 settlements or parishes, being formed bythe reducciones of the missionaries of St. Francis,and consisting at the present day, for the mostpart, of Spaniards and Creoles. The capital is thecity of Santiago de Castro, in the large island ofChiloe. [For further account, see index to addi-tional history of Chile, chap. lY. § 35.]

CHILON, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Santa Cruz de la Sierra in Peru ;situate in a valley which is beautiful and fertile,and which abounds in wheat. Twenty-eight leaguesfrom the settlement of Samaypata.

CHILOSTUTA, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Zedales in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CHILPANSINGO, a settlement of the intendancy of Mexico, surroundedwith fertile fields of wheat. Elevation 1080 me-tres, or 3542 feet.

CHILQUES Y MASQUES, a province andcorregimiento of Peru, bounded by the provinceof Quispicanchi; s.e. by that of Churabivilcas ;s. and s. w. by that of Cotabambas ; w. by that ofAbancay; and n. t®. by Cuzco. Its temperatureis various, the proportion of heat and cold beingregulated by its different degrees of elevation ; sothat in the quebradas or deep glens, it is warm,and in the sierras or mountains, cold. It is 13leagues in length, and 25 in width ; is watered bythree rivers, which are the Cusibamba, passingthrough the valley of this name, the Velille, andthe Santo Tomas ; over these rivers are extendedseven bridges, which form a communication withthe other provinces. It has likewise eight smalllakes, and in some of these are found water-fowl.The hot parts abound in all kinds of fruits ; inwheat, maize, pulse, potatoes, and are well stockedwith some sorts of cattle, and great herds of deer.Its natives fabricate the manufactures of the coun-try ; such as cloths, baizes, and coarse frieze, bymeans of chorillos, or running streams, as theyhave no mills for fulling, since a royal licence isnecessary for the making use of the same. Al-though the appearance of mines has in manyplaces been discovered amongst the mountains,yet no mines have as yet been worked, and twoonly have been known to have been opened informer times. This province has suffered muchfrom earthquakes ; and the greatest of these hap-pened in 1707, when many settlements were madedesolate. It is composed of 27 settlements, andthese contain 16,000 inhabitants. The capital isParuro ; and the repariimiento of the corregimientoused to amount to 84,550 dollars, and the alcamlaThe other settlements are.

to 676 dollars per ann.Colcha,

Araipalpa,

San Lorenzo,Parapacucho,

Ceapa,

Cuchirihuay,

Tucuyachi,

Coron,

Pacopata,

Aicha-Urinzaba,

Pilpinto,

Huayaconga,

Accha-Amansaia,

Parco,

Pocoray,

Hanoquite,

Corea,

Paucartarnbo,

Amacha,

Antapalpa,

Quilli,

Acca,

Vilque,

Capi,

Cavabamba,

Huancahuanca,

Yaurisque.

Same name, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Lucanas in the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Pucquin.

CHILTAL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Atacames or Esmeraldas in thekingdom of Quito ; situate in the valley of Chota,on the shore of the river Mira.

CHILTEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Tepalcatepcec in Nueva Espana. Its tem-perature is the mildest of any part of its jurisdic-tion. It is situate in the middle of a plain, ex-tending over the top of a hill, on two sides ofwhich are large chasms, so immensely deep, thatit is really astonishing to observe how the Indianscontrive to cultivate the impoleras on their edges.It contains 67 families of Indians, and is five leaguesto thes. of its head settlement.

Same name, a river of the province and alcal-diamayor of Tabasco, which runs into the sea.

CHILUA, San Marcos de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Huanta in Peru ;annexed to the Curacy of Huamanguilla.

CHIMA, a mountain of the kingdom of Quito,in the government and corregimiento of Chirnboor Guaranda, to tire zo. of the settlement of Asan-coto. It is entirely covered with woods and withstreams, which flow down from the heights intothe plains of Babahoyo. The river named De laChima runs from e. tow. until it joins the Caracol.A way has been opened through this mountainwhich leads to Guaranda or Guayaquil ; but it ispassable in the summer only. There is also an-other pass equally difficult and dangerous, calledAngas. The cold is great at the top of the moun-tain, and at the skirts the heat is excessive, it i.sin lat. 44' s.

3 L 2

Last edit over 1 year ago by LLILAS Benson
492

492

COL

COL

particularly those of (lie parish church, the con-vent of the monks of Niiestra Sonora de la Merced,another of St. Francis, and the hospital of S. J uande Dios. Its population consists of 200 familiesof Spaniards, 122 oi Mustees, 15 Mulattoes, and22 of Indians. In its district is found and gatheredthe celebrated plant called in the country oleacazan^■which is considered as a wonderful restorer of loststrength, and a certain specific against all kinds ofpoison. The leaves of it are applied to the partaffected, and the natives are accustomed to judgeof its virtues by its degree of adhesion. One hun-dred and fifty leagues to the w. of Mexico, inlong. 103^ 20', and lat. 18° 34'.

COLIMAS, a barbarous nation of Indians informer times, but now reduced to the faith, in theprovince of its name; this being now incorporatedwith that of Muzo of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.These Indians are also known by the name of Ca-napayes, being united to them. Its capital is thecity of La Palma de los Colimas. See articleMuzos.

COLIMBA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Popayán in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada.

COLINA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Santiago in the kingdom of Chile ;in the district of which there are five chapels ofcase, in a spacious and beautiful valley.

COLINA, a river of this province and kingdom,which rises in the mountains of its cordillera, andenters the Maypo.

COLIUINA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Nicaragua in the kingdom of Guate-mala ; situate upon a long strip of land on the coastof the S. sea.

(COLLA, a parish of the province and govern-ment of Buenos Ayres ; situate on a small rivernear the sea-coast, about eight leagues e. of Coloniadel Sacramento, in lat. 34° 19' 39" s. Long. 57°21' 43" w.')

COLLADOS, Ensenada de los a bay onthe s. coast of the w. head, and in the territory ofthe French, in the island of St. Domingo. It is be-tween the rock of Bareo and the river Damasein.

COLLAHUAS, and Asiento of Mines ofCaylloma, a province and corregwiiento of Peru ;bounded n. by that of Cbumbivilcas, e. by that ofCanes and Canches or Tinta, s. e, by that ofLampa, s. by that of Arequipa, and w. by that ofCamana. It is 52 leagues in length s. e. n. w. and16 in width. Its temperature is cold, from beingsituate in the cordillera ; with the exception of thatpart which borders upon Camana, where it isvery mild, especially in the five leagues where its

2

jurisdiction extends itself in the valley of Sihuas ;the other five leagues reaching to tlie sea borderingon Camana. Its productions are various : thoseof the valley are comprised in wine, brandies,wheat, maize, pulse, and fruits, especially figs,which being preserved, serve as nourishment tonumbers of poor people. The other territories ofthis province are of the same temperature, thoughcomparatively barren. It abounds in large andsmall cattle, native sheep, vicunas, and some wildanimals. The roads are dangerous, from thecountry’s being extremely unequal, and the greaterpart of it beinga craggy ravine, over which labours,rather than to say runs, a pretty large river, whichhas its rise within the province. Here are manysilver mines, from which great riches were formerlyextracted, since they yielded 80 or 100 marks eachcaxon. Atthe present day they yield but sparingly,on account of their great depth, some of them being200 fathoms in descent ; they are, nevertheless,worked with tolerable profit. The principalmountain of these mines is that of Caylloma, andit was through this mine that the capital wasfounded. There are also not wanting mines ofgold, tin, lead, copper, and sulphur; but these, onaccount of the deficiency of resources, remain un-worked. The capital, as we have before stated, isCaylloma. Its repartimmito used to amount to37,100 dollars, and its alcavala to 456 dollars perannum. The other settlements of the jurisdictionare.

Tisco,

Madrigal,

Callalli,

Tapay,

Sibayo,

A^angui,

Tuty,

Achoma,

Llauta,

Murco,

Taya,

Sihuas,

Chibay,

Maca,

Canocota,

Y chupampa,

Coperaque,

Chabanaconde,

Lary,

Pinchollo,

Huanca,

Huambo,

Yura,

Hucan.

COLLANA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Cicasica in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Mccapa. Its Indian inhabitants havekept themselves unmixed from any other cast eversince the time of the conquest ; and in order to stillpreserve themselves so, they will not allow of anystrangers sleeping in the settlement, though heshould be sent by the corregidor. If any otherperson should come among them, he is put intoprison, and after a very short time dispatched.Owing to these precautions, the vicious propen-pensities observable in other settlements are en~

Last edit over 1 year ago by kmr3934
505

CON

CON 505

purchase, obtained an act of incorporation, Sep-tember 3, 1655 ; and this was the most distantsettlement from the sea-shore of New England atthat time. The settlers never liad any contest withthe Indians ; and only three persons were ever kill-ed by them within the limits of the town. In1791, there were in this township 225 dwellinglionses, and 1590 inhabitants ; of the latter therewere 80 persons upwards ot 70 years old. For 13years previous to 1791, the average number ofdeaths was 17 ; one in four of whom were 70 yearsold and upwards. The public buildings are, aCongregational church, a spacious stone gaol, thebest in New England, and a very handsome countycourt-house. The town is accommodated withthree convenient bridges over the river ; one ofwhich is 208 feet long, and 18 feet wide, supportedby 12 piers, built after the manner of Charles riverbridge. This town is famous in the history of therevolution, having been the seat of the provincialcongress in 1774, and the spot where the first op-position was made to the British troops, on thememorable 19th of April 1775. The generalcourt have frequently held their sessions here whencontagious diseases have prevailed in the capital.Lat. 42° 20'

(Concord, a small river of Massachusetts,formed of two branches, which unite near thecentre of the town of Concord, whence it takes itscourse in a n. e. and n. direction through Bed-ford and Billerica, and empties itself into Merri-mack river at Tewksbury. Concord river isremarkable for the gentleness of its current, whichis scarcely perceivable by the eye. At low watermark it is from 100 to 200 feet wide, and from threeto 12 feet deep. During floods. Concord riveris near a mile in breadth ; and when viewed fromthe town of Concord, makes a fine appearance.)

(Concord, a township in Delaware county,Pennsylvania.)

(Concord, a settlement in Georgia, on the e.bank of the Mississippi, about a mile from the s.line of Tennessee, 108 miles h. from the mouth ofYazoo river, and 218 bclov/ the Ohio.)

CONDACHE, a river of the province and go-vernment of Quixos in the kingdom of Quito. Itruns n. e. and traversing the royal road whichleads from Baza to Archidono, enters the river Co-quindo on its s. side, in 37' lat.

(CONDE, Fort, or Mobile City, is situate onthe w. side of Mobile bay, in W. Florida, about40 miles above its mouth, in the gulf of Mexico.Lat. 30° 59' n. Long. 88° 11' a'.)

CONDE, a small river of the province andcountry of the Iroquees Indians, in New France or

VOL. I.

Canada. It runs n. and enters the lake On-tario.

CONDE, another of the same name. SecV E H D E .

(CONDECEDO, or Desconocida, a cape orpromontory of N. America, in the province ofYucatán, *100 miles w. of Merida. Lat. 20° 50' n.Long. 90° 45' w.)

CONDEBAMBA, a large and beautiful valleyof the provitice and fo?TCg7'??//f>«/o of Huamachucoin Peru ; celebrated for its fertility.

CONDES, River of the, in the straits of Ma-gellan. It runs into the sea opposite the islandSanta Ana.

CONDESA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena; situate near the coast,at the mouth of the Dique, which forms a com-munication between the sea and the grand riverMagdalena.

CONDESUIOS DE Arequipa, a provinceand corregimiento of Peru : bounded n. by that ofParinocochas, e. by that of Chumbivilcas, s. e.by that of Canes and Canches, and s. by that ofCollahuas. It is generally of a cold temperature,even in the less lofty parts of the cordillera ; ofa rough and broken territory, and with very badroads. Nevertheless, no inconsiderable proportionof wheat is grown in the low grounds, as likewise ofmaize, and other seeds and fruits, such as grapes,pears, peaches, apples, and some flowers. Upontlie heights breed many vicunas, huanacos, andvizcachas, and in other parts is obtained cochineal,here called macno, and which is bartered by theIndians for baizes of the manufacture of the country,and for cacao. It has some gold mines whichwere worked in former times, and which, on ac-count of the baseness of the metal, the depth of themines, and hardness of the strata, have not pro-duced so much as formerly they did, althoughthey are not now without yielding some emolu-ment : such are those of Airahua, Quiquimbo,Araure, and Aznacolea, which may produce alittle more than the expences incurred in Avorkirigthem. The gold of these mines is from 19 to 20carats, and they produce from tliree to four ounceseach cfljjow. They are Avorked by means of steeland powder, and the metals are ground in mills.The greater part of the natives of tliis province oc-cupy themselves in carrying the productions of thevalley of Mages, of the province of Carnana, suchas Avines and brandies, to the other provinces ofthe sierra; also in the cultivation of seeds, andsome in working the mines. It is watered by somesmall rivers or streams, which, incorporate them-selves, and form t-wm large rivers. The capital is3 T

Last edit over 1 year ago by kmr3934
525

COT

COT

525

the province and captainship of Marañan, betweenthe rivers Camindes and Paraguay.

Costa-Desierta, a large plain of the At-lantic, between cape S. Antonio to the n. and capeBlanco to the s. It is 80 leagues long, and has onthe n. the llanuras ox pampas of Paraguay, on theetJ. the province of Cuyo, of the kingdom of Chile,on the s. the country of the Patagones, and on tliec. the Atlantic. It is also called the Terras Ma-gellanicas, or Lands of Magellan, and the wholeof this coast, as well as the land of the interior terri-tory, is barren, uncultivated, and unknoAvn.

Costa-Rica, a province and government ofthe kingdom of Guatemala in N. America ; boundedn. and w. by the province ot Nicaragua, e. bythat of Veragua of the kingdom of Tierra Firme ;s. w. and n. w. by the S. sea, and n. e. by the N.sea. It is about 90 leagues long e. w. and 60 n. s.Here are some gold and silver mines. It has portsboth in the N. and S. seas, and tAVO excellent bays,called San Geronimo and Caribaco. It is for themost part a province that is mountainous and fullof rivers ; some of which enter into the N. sea, andothers into the S. Its productions are similar tothose of the other provinces in the kingdom ; butthe cacao produced in some of the llanuras hereis of an excellent quality, and held in much esti-mation. The Spaniards gave it the name ofCosta-Rica, from the quantity of gold and silvercontained in its mines. From the mine calledTisingal, no less riches have been extracted thanfrom that of Potosi in Peru ; and a tolerable tradeis carried on by its productions with the kingdomof Tierra Firme, although the navigation is not al-way« practicable. The first monk Avho came hi-ther to preach and inculcate religion amongst thenatives, was the Fra_y Pedro de Betanzos, of theorder of St. Francis, who came hither in 1550,when he was followed by several others, whofounded in various settlements 17 convents of theabove order. The capital is Cartago.

Costa-Rica, a river of the province ancT go-vernment of Nicaragua in the same kingdom,which runs n. and enters theDesaguadero, or W asteW ater of the Lake.

COSTO, a settlement of the English, in theisland of Barbadoes, of the district and parish ofSantiago ; situate near the w. coast.

COTA, a settlement of the corregimiento of i-paquira in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is ofa very cold temperature, produces the fruits pecu-liar to its climate, contains upwards of 100 In-dians, and some white inhabitants ; and is fourleagues from Santa Fe.

Cota, a small river of the province and govern-

ment of Buenos Ayres in Peru. It rises in thesierras, or craggy mountains, of Nicoperas, runsw. and enters the Gil.

COTABAMBAS, a province and corregimientoof Peru ; bounded n. by the province of Abancay,s. w. and s. and even s. e. by that of Chilques andMasques or Paruro, w, by that of Chumbivilcas,and n. w. by that of Aimaraez. It is 25 leagueslong e.w. and 23 wide n.s. It is for the mostpart of a cold temperature, as are the other pro-vinces of the sierra; it being nearly covered Avithmountains, the tops of which are the greatest partof the year clad Avith snoAV. In the Ioav lands aremany pastures, in Avhich they breed numerousherds of cattle, such as cows, horses, mules, andsome small cattle. Wheat, although in no greatabundance, maize, pulse, and potatoes, also groAvhere. In the broken, uneven hollows, near whichpasses the river Apurimac, and which, after passingthrough the province, runs into that of Abancay,groAV plantains, figs, water melons, and other pro-ductions peculiar to the coast. Here are abund-ance of magueges', which is a plant, the leaves ortendrils of which, much resemble those of thesavin, but being somewhat larger ; from them aremade a species of hemp for the fabricating ofcords, called cahuyas, and some thick ropes usedin the construction of bridges across the rivers.The principal rivers are the Oropesa and the Chal-huahuacho, Avhich have bridges for the sake ofcommunication Avith the other provinces. Tliebridge of Apurimac is three, and that of Churuc-tay 86 yards across ; that of Churuc, Avhich is themost frequented, is 94 yards ; and there is anotherwhich is much smaller : all of them being built ofcords, except one, called Ue Arihuanca, on theriver Oropesa, which is of stone and mortar, andhas been here since the time that the ferry-boat wassunk, Avith 15 men and a quantity of Spanishgoods, in 1620. Although it is remembered thatgold and silver mines have been worked in thisprovince, none are at present ; notAvithstanding thatin its mountains are manifest appearances of thismetal, as well as of copper, and that in a part ofthe river Ocabamba, Avhere the stream runs witligreat rapidity, are found lumps^ of silver, whichare washed off from the neighbouring mountains.The inhabitants of the whole of the provinceamount to 10,000, who are contained in the 25following settlements ; and the capital is Tambo-bamba.

Cotabambas,

Totora,

Cullurqui,

Huaillati,

1

Palpakachi,

Llikehavilea,

Corpahuasi,

Pituhuanca.

Last edit over 1 year ago by kmr3934
All 5 records