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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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AHUACAZALCA, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of San Luis de la Costa,and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espaiia.It contains 56 families of Indians, -whose com-merce consists in rice and cotton. Three leaguesn. e. of its liead settlement.

AHUACAZINGO, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Atengo, and alcaldiamayor of Chilapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains46 families of Indians, and is ten leagues e. of itshead settlement.

AHUALICAN, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Tixtlan in Nueva Espana ; of a benignand salutary temperature, as it is fanned by then,breezes. It lies three leagues n. of its head settle-ment, which is Oapan ; and contains 36 familiesof Indians.

AHUATELCO, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofIzucai in Nueva Espana, situate on the skirt of thevolcano of the same name. In its district areeight settlements, inhabited by 289 families of In-dians, and 11 of Musiees and Mulattoes, wholive in some temporary habitations for labourers.It is situate on a cold, rough, and barren soil, butis nevertheless fertile in wheat, and abounds inwater and cattle. Eight leagues n. w. of its capital.

AHUATEMPA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Santa Isabel, and alcaldiamayor of Cholula, in Nueva Espana. It contains 39families of Indians, and is two leagues s.of its capital.

AHUATEPEC, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espana. It contains 32 families of In-dians, and is two leagues n. of its capitaL

AHUATLAN, San Pedko de, a settlementof the head settlement of the district of San Juandel Rio, and alcaldia mayor of Queretaro, in NuevaEspana ; annexed to the curacy of the formerplace, and lying ten leagues n. w, of the latter.

AHUEHUEZINGO, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Chietlan, and alcaldiamayor of Izucar, in Nueva Espana.

AHUEZITLA, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espana. It contains 36 families of In-dians, and abounds in chia, (a white medicinalearth), grain, and earthen-ware. It is nine leaguesw, n. w. of its capital.

AHWAHHAWAY, a race of Indians, whodiffer but very little in any particular from theMandans, their neighbours, except in the unjustwar which they, as well as the Minetares, prosecuteagainst the defenceless Snake Indians. They claimto have once been a part of the Crow Indians, whom

they still acknowledge as relations. They haveresided on the Missouri as long as their traditionwill enable them to inform.

AIABACA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Piura in Peru.

AIACASI, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chumbivilcas in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Belille.

AIACOA, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana, or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises to the w. of the Sierra Maiguatida, runs e. andenters the Orinoco near the rapid stream of theMarumarota.

AIACOCHA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huanta in Peru, situate in theisland Tayacaja.

AIAHUALTEMPA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Zitlala, and alcaldia mayorof Chilapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains 36 fa-milies of Indians, and is three leagues to the s. ofits head settlement.

AIAHUALULCO, a settlement of the head set-tlement of the district of Ixlahuacan, and alcaldiamayor of Xalapa, in Nueva Espana, which, in theMexican language, signifies a small river. Itabounds in the best fruits of its jurisdiction, suchas pears and other sorts of fruit highly esteemed atVera Cruz. It contains only three families of Spa-niards, 22 of Mustees and Mulattoes, and 70 of In-dians. In its district are several temporary habi.tations for labourers, and pastures for breeding cat-tle, which reach as far as the district of Tepcaca,in the lofty eminence of Xamiltepec, 16 leaguesdistant from Xalapa. It includes also within itsadministration the cultivated estates extending asfar as the place called Puertezuelo, where this juris-diction approximates to that of San Juan de losLlanos on the w. s.w. side ; and in the culture ofthe above estates many Spaniards, 3Iustees, andMulattoes, are employed. One league s. w. of itshead settlement.

Aiahualulco, another settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Zitlala, and alcaldiamayor of Chilapa, in the kingdom of Xalapa, andannexed to the curacy of this place, from which itis three leagues distant, being nine to the s. of itshead settlement. It contains 42 families of Indians,including another small settlement incorporatedwith it.

AlAHUASA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Pachaconas.

AIAMARCA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Castro Virreyna in Peru, an-nexed to the curacy of Cordova.

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those which form its different mouths : also theisland of its name, inhabited by the Guaranos In-dians.

CAPUXA, a small settlement of the jurisdictionand alcaldía mayor of Ixmiquilpán, and of the ca-pital of Orizava, in Nueva España.

CAQUETA, a very large and abundant riverrising in the province of Sucumbios in the kingdomof Quito, in the mountains of Mocoa, this namebeing also given to it: it runs from w. to e. Onthe s. it gathers the waters of the San Pedro, SantaCruz, and Arevalo, and on the n. those of theLucia, Pato, Tango, Tabaquero, Cascabeles,Iscanzé, and others of an inferior description. Itdivides itself into two arms, the one of which takesthe name of Yupura, and which, running nearly tothe same point as the Marañon, separates itself intoother branches, which enter into this latter river in4° of lat. and immediately become as large andconsiderable as if they were the main stream : theother arm is also divided into two, the one takinga n. e. course, and entering the Orinoco, and theother running s. e. and bearing the name of the RioNegro ; by means of which, in the year 1744, somePortuguese came from Marañon to Orinoco, andproved the communication of these rivers, whichbefore was doubted : also by one of the arms of theYupura, Gonzalo Ximenes de Quesada found hisway to the new kingdom of Granada when heundertook its conquest. Some maintain that thisriver was the Orinoco, and thus has Don PedroMaldonado represented it in his map published inthe year 1750; but that of the Father BernadoRosella, missionary of the abolished society of theJesuits in Orinoco, made after the notes and in-structions of the Father Manuel Roman, attributeswith some confidence another origin to the Orinoco,and speaks of the Caquetá as one of the rivers whichenter it on the w. side. The Spanish geographerCruz, in his General Chart of America, makes nodistinction between the Yupura and the Caquetá,and only speaks of one stream, which runs con-tinually to the s. s. e. through the territory of the Ca-vauris Indians, before it enters the Marañon. Hedelineates the same as throwing out four branchesto the w. and three to the e. all which join the latterriver ; and he further states, that before it becomesthus divided, it forms on its n. side two large lakescalled Ynabavú and Cumapi ; from the whole ofwhich may be easily inferred how great is theabundance of its waters.

CAQUEZA, a settlement of the corregimiento ofUbaque in the new kingdom of Granada, situate ina warm but pleasant and agreeable soil, althoughmuch infested by venomous snakes called tayas :

CAR

it abounds in the productions of a warm climate,contains more than 200 housekeepers, and is nineleagues to the s. w. of Santa Fe, in the road whichleads from San Juan de los Llanos to this capital.

CAQUIAUIRI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Pacages in Peru.

CAQUINGORA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Pacages in Peru.

CARA, an ancient province of the kingdom ofQuito towards the w. It extends itself along thecoast of the Pacific sea from the point of Pajonal tothe bay of Quaquez, for the space of 19 or 20leagues ; is watered by the rivers Tasagua andChonos to the s. and by the Jama to the n. Thewhole of the lands lie low, and are uncultivated andfull of wood ; the climate is hot and moist. It is atpresent united to the province of Esmeraldas.

CARA, the capital, which is now destroyed, wasfounded by Francisco de Ribas in the year 1562.It was situate in the bay of Cara, which is formedby the mouths of the two rivers Tasagua andChones : its ruins are still to be seen, and from thesewas built the settlement of Canoa, at six leaguesdistance, which was the residence of the lieutenantgovernor. This settlement was in 31' s. lat.

Cara, with the addition of BELLA, a small set-tlement of the Portuguese in the province and cap-tainship of Puerto Seguro in Brazil ; situate at thesource of the river Prieto, and in the territory orcountry of the Pories Indians.

CARABAIA, a province and corregimiento ofPeru, bounded on the e. by Larecaja, w. by Quis-picanchi, n. w. and n. by the territories of theinfidel Indians, called Carangues, Sumachuanes,and others, who are separated by the famous riverInambary; s. w. by the province of Canes andCanches or Tinta, and s. by Lampa and Asangaro,and in part by Puno or Paucarcolla. According {othe nice measurements which were made with re-gard to this province as well as of the others, it issaid to be 40 leagues from n. to s. and 50 at themost from e. to w. Its furtherest limits are only 14leagues distant from Cuzco, although on horsebackit is necessary to go a round of 60 leagues. Itsclimate is various, according to the more or lesselevated situation of the country; so that it is insome parts very cold, and in others more temperate.The pastures are good, consequently there is nowant of cattle, and in the neighbourhood of theAndes they gather three or four crops of coca inthe year. In this province is included that calledSan Gaban, which was united to it; many settle-ments having been at the same time added to theprovinces of Larecaja, Lampa and Asangaro. Ithas abounded more in gold than any other province

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CATAMARCA, S. Fernando de, a city ofthe province and government of Tucumán, found-ed by Juan Gomez Zurita, in 1538, in the fertileand extensive valley of Conando. It has a fort torepress the encroachments of the Indians. Thename of Canete was given it in honour to the vice-roy who then commanded in Peru ; this was after-wards changed to London, in honour to the queenof England, wife of Philip II. king of Spain. Theinquietudes caused amongst the inhabitants by theinfidel Indians induced Don Geronimo Luis deCabrera, son of a governor of that province, in1663, to remove it to another not less fertile val-ley, and to give it the name of San J uan de la Ri-vero ; and lastly, by the permission of the king,in 1683, it was transferred to a spot in the valleyof Catamarca ; where it still remains, under thesame title, at 80 leagues distance from its first sta-tion. It has, besides the parish church, a conventof the Recoletos monks of St. Francis, with thededicatory title of San Pedro de Alcantara ; anhospital of Merced ; aud a house of residence,which formerly belonged to the regulars of thecompany of Jesuits. On the w. side of the val-ley is a mountain in which there are gold mines ;and on the w. also from n. to s. runs a serrama^ theskirts of which are for many leagues covered withestates and cultivated grounds, and filled, fromthe abundance of fine pastures, with lage and smallcattle and with mules. A tolerably large riverruns through the valley in the rainy season, andterminates in some lakes M’hich are formed by itabout 30 leagues s. of the city. The commerce ofthis city is very small, so that there is no coin cur-rent ; and even the payments of the royal dutiesare paid in effects, and in the productions of thecountry, such as cotton, linens, pepper, brandy,and wheat. Lat. 27° s.

Catamarca, a settlement of the same provinceand government ; situate in the district of thiscity.

CATAMBUCU, a settlement of the provinceand government of Popayán in the kingdom ofQuito.

CATAN, San Francisco de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Caxamarca inPeru ; annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CATANERA, an ancient province of Peru, inthat of Condesuyos, in which dwelt the nation ofthe Quechuas. It was subjected to the empire bythe Inca Capac Y upanqui, fifth Emperor.

CATANIAPU, a river of the province and go-vernment of Guayana or Nueva Andalucia. Itrises to the s. of the settlement of San Joseph de

Mapoyes, runs w. and enters the Orinoco close tothe torrent of Los Atures.

CATAPUIN, San Juan de, a settlement ofthe province and government of Quixos y Macasin the kingdom of Quito.

CATARAQUA, or Catarakui, a copiousriver of the province and country of the IroqueesIndians. It rises from the lake Ontario, runs n. e.and continues its course as far as Quebec, fromwhence it takes the name of St. Lawrence, andthen enters the sea.

Cataraqua, a bay on the n. coast of lakeOntario, in New France or Canada.

CATARUBEN, a settlement of the missions ofSan Juan de los Llanos in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; one of the seven which were held bythe regulars of the company of Jesuits, and be-longing to the nation of the Salivas Indians. TheCaribes burnt and destroyed it in 1684.

CATAROSI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Aymaraez in Peru; annexed tothe curacy of Pampamarca.

CATAS-ALTAS, a settlement or village of thePortuguese, in the province and captainship ofEspiritu Santo, and kingdom of Brazil ; situate onthe shore of the river Doce or Dulce.

CATAUBA, a river of Virginia, which runsn. e. and enters the Thames.

Catauba, another river in S. Carolina, whichruns s. e. and enters the Watery.

(CATAWESSY, a township in Northumberlandcounty, Pennsylvania ; situate on the s. e. bankof the e. branch of Susquehannah river, oppositethe mouth of Fishing creek, and about 20 milesn. e. of Sunbury.)

CATCA, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Paucartambo in Peru.

CATCH, or Boutin, a port of the coast ofNova Scotia, between the bay of Cheboucto andtbe island of Samborough.

CATEMU, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom of Chile,on the shore of the river Quillota.

(CATHANCE, or Cathants, a small river inLincoln county, Maine, which rises in Topsham,and empties into Merry Meeting bay, and has se-veral mills upon it.)

(CATHERINE’S Isle, St, a small island inthe captainship of St. Vincent’s in Brazil, be-longing to the Portuguese, 47 leagues s. of Cana-nea island. It is about 23 miles from n. to s. in-habited by Indians, wiio assist the Portugueseagainst their enemies, the natives of Brazil. Lak27° 10' s. Long. 47° 15' w.)

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the river Marailon has its rise in tins lake ; its realorigin being in the lake Lauricociia, as may beseen under that article.

CHINCHERO, a settlement of the provinceand correghniado of Calca y Lares in Perú. Thecemetery of its church is composed of some large,thick Avails of Avrouglit stone, well fitted together,and having in them certain niches similar to sentryboxes ; so that they appear as having formerly be-longed to some fortress.

Same name, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Andahuailas in the same king-dom.

Same name, a lake in the province of Cuzco,five leagues distant from this city.

CHINCHILCA, as otherswill have it, a river of the district of Guadalabquien and kingdom of Chile ; it runs n. n. w. andenters the river Callacalla.

CHINCHIPE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Jaen de Bracamoros in the king-dom of Quito.

Same name, a river of this province, whichrises from the mountain desert or paramo of La Sabanilla. It Avashes the city and territory of Val-ladolid, and on its c. side receives the rivers Nnm-balla, Vergel, Patacones, Sangalla, San Francisco,and Nambacasa ; and on its zs. side those of Pa-landa, Simanchi, Namballe, and Guancabamba ;when, being sAA'^elled to a considerable size by all ofthese, it enters the Maranon on the n. shore, to thew. w. of the settlement of Tompenda.

CHINCHIRU, a large lake of the province andcorregimiento of Cuzco in Peru, from whence it liestwo leagues to the n.

CHINCHULAGUA, a very lofty desert mountainor paramo, covered with eternal snow, in theprovince and corregimiento of Tacunga in thekingdom of Quito. It lies five leagues to the n. ofTacunga, Avith a slight inclination to the n. c.

CHINCONTLA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of Olintla, and alcaldia mayor of Zacatlan,in Nueva Espana ; situate in a delightful defile ornarroAV tract, watered by various rivers. Eightleagues from its head settlement.

CHINCOTEAG, a small island near the coastof the N. sea, in the province and colony of Maryland,between the Cedar isle and the river Si-wanscut.

CHINGA, a fortress of the Nuevo Reyno de Granada; one of the six Avhich were held by the%ipas or kings of Bogota, against the Punches na-tion, who border upon their country ; 10 leaguesto the s. w. of Bogota.

CHINGOS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Gongor.

CHINI, a small island of the S. sea; situateclose to the coast of the province and governmentof Costarica in the kingdom of Guatemala, withinthe gulf ofNicoya, and in the innermost part of it.

CHINIJO, a settlement of the missions whichAvere held by the religious order of St. Augustin,in the country of the Gran Paititi, of the provinceand corregimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CHINIPAS, a settlement of the missions of theprovince and government of Cinaloa.

Same name, some sierras of this province.

CHINGUINTILEA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huamanga in Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Aneo.

CHINU, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cartagena in the kingdom ofTierraFirme ; founded in the sahanas, and formed by are-union of other settlements, in 1776, by the G'o-A^ernor Uon Juan Piraiento.

CHIPACO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Huamalies in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chavin de Pariarca.

CHIPALO, a river of the province and governmentof Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ;one of those Avhich enter the great river Mag-dalena.

CHIPALZINGO, a settlement and head ettlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tixtlanin Nueva Espana. It contains 353 families ofIndians, and of Spaniards, Mustces, and Mn-lattoes, and lies three leagues from the sett lemcn!,of Zurnpango.

CHIPAN, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Lucanas in Peru.

CHIPANGA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Quixos and Macas in the kingdom oiQuito. It rises in the sierra, Avhich divides thedistrict of Macas from the province of Mainas, runsfrom n. to s. and enters the Morona.

CHIPAQUE, a settlement of the corregimientoof Ubaque in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a mild temperature, and abounds in fruits andseeds peculiar to a warm climate. It consists of150 housekeepers, and of as many Indians. It isso infested with snakes, that it is impossible to findany part of it clear of them. Eight leagues .9. .of Santa Fe, in the road which leads to San Juande los Llanos.

CHIPASAQUE, a settlement of the corregimiento of Guatavita in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada.It is of an hot temperature, lying 24 leagues to thes. e. of Santa Fe, and close to the settlement ofChaqueta, in the road Avhich leads to San Juan dc

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running to unite themselves with that of Toachi.It is to the n. of the paramo of Elenisa, and issometimes covered with snow.

CORCA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Huanoquite.

(CORCAS, or Grand Corcas, an islandalmost in the form of a crescent, n. of St. Do-mingo, in the windward passage, about sevenleagues w. of Turk’s island, and about 20 e. ofLittle Inagua or Heneagua. Lat. 21° 45' n.Long. 71° ob' w.)

CORCHUE, a settlement of Indians of the pro-vince and government of Valdivia in the kingdomof Chile.

CORCOLA, a settlement of the Portuguese, inthe territory of the Giiayazas Indians, of the king-dom of Brazil; situate at the source and on theshore of the river Tocantines.

CORCOUADO, a settlement of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits in the province and government of LosLlanos, of the Nuevo Reyno de Gratiada, andwhich is at present under the charge of the reli-gious order of St. Francis.

CORCOUADO, a rock or island of the S. sea, op-posite the port of Santa, of the province and corre-gimiento of this name in Peru.

CORCULLA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacochas in Peru.

CORDES. See Verdf.

CORDILLERA. See Andes.

CORDILLIERS, Montagne des, a mountainof the island of Cayenne, on the skirts of avliichthe French have a fort and establishment for itsdefence.

CORDON, PUNTA DEL, a point of the coast ofthe w. head of the island of St. Domingo, on theshore of the port Pimiento.

CORDOVA, a province and alcaldia mayor ofNueva España; bounded w. by the province ofOrizava ; n. by that of San Juan de los Llanos ;e. by that of the ancient Vera Cruz ; and s. by therugged mountains of Songolica. It has on the5. e. and s.s. e. the great estate of Mataanona, 10leagues from Taliscona, the last boundary of VeraCruz. It is of a hot and moist temperature ; thegreater part of its district is composed of brokenand uneven grounds, and mountains covered withcedars, walnuts, pines, and ocotales. It has alsobeautiful and fertile plains, abounds in birds andanimals of the chase, and no less in fish, many troutand bohos being caught out of the rivers by whichthis province is irrigated. In the spacious plainof Altotonga runs a rapid river, by which it is

fertilized, and rendered abundant in every kind ofvegetable production. Here also breed manyflocks of cattle, which are the chief commerceof the place. The capital bears the same name.

This was founded in 1618, by order of the vice-roy Don Diego Fernandez de Cordova, Marquisof Gnadalcazar, who gave it his name. It is of ahot and moist temperature ; situate to the w. ofsome small mountains, which form an half-circle,and are surrounded by many umbrageous trees.The parish church is magnificent, of exquisitearchitecture, and rich ornaments. Here is a con-vent of the religious Descalzos (barefooted order)of St. Francis, and one of St. Hippolyte dela Ca-ridad, in which there is an hospital for the sickSpaniards, and for the black slaves, endowed bythe masters and proprietors of certain mills, in whichan infinite quantity of sugar is made. It aboundsin this artich', with those of tobacco, Chinaoranges, ajonjoli, large cattle, and swine ; as alsoother fruits and articles of merchandize peculiarto Europe and the kingdom itself. [Hun.boldtassert.s that the environs of Cordova and Orizabaproduce all the tobacco consumed in New Spain.]Its population consists of 260 families of Spaniards,126 of Mustees, 70 of Mulattoes and Negroes,and 273 of Mexican Indians ; of many others alsowho are of various classes, and Avho work in thesugar-mills. Forty-eight leagues to the e. «. c. ofMexico, in lat. 18° 50' ; long. 96° 56'. Theothersettlements of this jurisdiction are,

Santa Ana de Zacan, San Diego,

Chocaman,

Yxhuatlan,

Coscomatepec,

Sta. Maria Magdalena,Calcahualco,

S. Antonio Huatuzco,Amatlan de los Reyes,

San Bartolome,Totutla,

Copan,

Zentla,

San Diego Huatuzco,San J uan de la Punta,San Lorenzo.

Cordova, another city, the capital of the provincoand government of Tucumán in Peru ; founded bythe governor of that province, Geronimo Cabrera,in 1573, and not by Juan Nuilezde Prado, in 1549,according to the erroneous account of the Ex-jesuit Coleti. It was in the territory of the Comi-chingones Indians, and part which they calledKisliisacate, on the shore of the river Piicani ;but removed from thence to the x. part of thesame river ; the parish being dedicated to NuestraSenora de la Pena of France, and being under theobligation of celebrating its festival on the day ofthe conception, when it was also usual to displaythe spectacle of a bull-fight. It is situate in anarrow bay, close to which is a lotty n'ountain.It is much exposed to inundations in the rainy

Last edit about 2 years ago by kmr3934
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