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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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vince and government, on the shore of the riverMasparro, between the cities of New and Old Ba-rinas.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Venezuela, on theshore of the river Mosquitos, near where this riverenters the Orituco.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Cartagena, in thekingdom of Tierra Firme.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of La Sonora in NuevaEspana ; situate in the country of the SobaipurisIndians, on the shore of a river which enters theGila, between the settlements of San Cosme andSan Angelo.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and government of Tucumán, in thejurisdiction of the city of Xuxuy, with four cha-pels of ease.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theprovince and alcaldia mayor of Los Zoques in thekingdom of Guatemala.

Catalina, Santa, another, of the provinceand alcaldia mayor of Chiapa in the same king-dom.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theisland of Barbadoes, in the parish and district of S.George.

Catalina, Santa, another settlement of theisland of Jamaica, which is a parish of the Eng-lish, situate in the s. part.

Catalina, Santa, some sierras or mountainsof the coast of Brazil, in the province and captain-ship of Rey, opposite the island of Santa Catalina,from which they take their name.

Catalina, Santa, a cape or point of land onthe coast of the province and government of Cos-tarica and kingdom of Guatemala, between theport of Las Velas and the town of Nicaragua.

Catalina, Santa, a small island close to thes. coast of the island of St. Domingo, between LaSaona and the bay of Caballo.

Catalina, Santa, another island of the coastof Florida to the n. of Georgia.

Catalina, Santa, another island of the coastof Georgia, between the islands Sapola and As-sabaw.

Catalina, Santa, a bay on the coast of thestraits of Magellan, between point St. Silvestre andpoint St. Antonio de Padua.

Catalina, Santa, a bay of the e. coast of theisland of Newfoundland, between the Saint’s capeand New cape.

Catalina, Santa, a river of the province andcolony of Maryland, in the county of Talbot. Itruns j. and enters the sea in the bay of Chesapeak.

Catalina, Santa, an island of the N. sea,near the coast of Tierra Firme, opposite the Escu-do de Veraguas. It is of a good temperature, fer-tile, and abounding in cattle and fruits. It had init a settlement defended by two castles, called San-tiago and Santa Teresa; which, together with thetown, were destroyed by an English pirate, JohnMorgan, who took the island in 1665 ; and al-though it was recovered in the same year by thepresident of Panama and Colonel Don J uan Perezde Guzman, it remained abandoned and desert.

Catalina, Santa, another small island nearthe coast of Brazil. See St. Catherine.

Catalina, Santa, a small island, situate tothe s. of St. Domingo, and close to it in the frontof the settlement of Higuey.

Catalina, Santa, a valley, in which there isalso a small settlement, in the Nuevo Reyno deLeon ; annexed to the curacy of its capital, fromwhence it lies three leagues to the w. It contains20 families in its neighbourhood, and producesonly some sorts of pulse and some goats.

Catalina, Santa, another valley of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Moquehua in Peru,bounded by a river and by the cordillera.

Catalina, Santa, a bay on the coast ofNova Scotia, between the port Carnero and thatof Ours or Oso.

CATAMAIU, a large and rapid river of theprovince and government of Loxa in the kingdomof Quito, also called Chira, at the part where itenters the sea. It rises in the paramo or desertmountain of Sabanilla ; and collecting the watersof several smaller rivers, runs from s. to n.until it unites itself with tlie Gonzanama, whichenters it on the s. side, in lat. S° 47' s. ; it thenturns its course to the xo. and afterwards to the5 . w. and receives the tributary streams of therivers Quiros, Macara, and Pelingara ; all ofwhich enter it on the s. side. Being swelled withthese, it takes the name of Amotape, from the settle-ment of this name, situate on its shore. Near itsmouth this river is called Colan, and it empties it-self into the sea in the corregimiento and provinceofPiura. The countries which it laves are fertileand beautiful, and its banks are covered with or-chards and plantations of sugar-canes of the terri-tory of Loxa. The climate here is very hot, andin the valleys formed by this river the inhabitantsare much afflicted with the tertian fever ; its wa-ters are generally very cold and unwliolesonic.

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[unexpectedly into one of their houses of worship,found the cacique employed in obtaining responsesfrom the zemi. By the sound of the voice whichcame from the idol, they knew that it was hollow,and dashing it to the ground to expose the impos-ture, they discovered a tube which was before co-vered with leaves, that communicated from theback part of the image to an inner apartment,whence the priest issued his precepts as through aspeaking trumpet ; but the cacique earnestly en-treated them to say nothing of what they had seen,declaring that by means of such pious frauds, hecollected tributes, and kept his kingdom in sub-jection. Happily, however, the general system oftheir superstition, though not amiable, was notcruel. We find among them but few of thosebarbarous ceremonies which filled the Mexicantemples with pollution, and the spectators withhorror.

5. Their arts . — Our islanders had not only theskill of making excellent cloth from their cotton,but they practised also the art of dyeing it with avariety of colours; some of them of the utmostbrilliancy and beauty. The piraguas were fullysufficient for the navigation they were employedin, and indeed were by no means contemptible sea-boats. We are told that some of these vesselsAvere navigated with forty oars ; and Herrera re-lates, that Bartholomew Columbus, in passingthrough the gulf of Honduras, fell in with one thatwas eight feet in breadth, and in length equal to aSpanish galley. Over the middle was an awning,,composed of mats and palm-tree leaves ; under-neath Avhich were disposed the women and chil-dren, secured both from rain and the spray of thesea. It Avas laden with commodities from Yucatan.These vessels Avere built either of cedar, or thegreat cotton-tree hollowed, and made square ateach end like punts. Their gunnels Avere raisedAvith canes braced close, and smeared over withsome bituminous substance to render them Avater-tight, and they had sharp keels. Our islandersfar surpassed most other savage nations in the ele-gance and variety of their domestic utensils andfurniture, their earthenware, curiously Avovenbeds, and implements of husbandry. Martyrspeaks Avith admiration of the Avorkmanship ofsome of the former of these. In the account hegives of a magnificent donation from Anacoana toBartholomew Columbus, on his first visit to thatprincess, he observes, that among other valuablesshe presented him with 14 chairs of ebony beauti-fully wrought, and no less than 60 vessels of dif-ferent sorts, for the use of his kitchen and table,

VOL. I.

air of which Avere ornamented Avith figures of va-rious kinds, fantastic forms, and accurate repre-sentations of living animals. The industry andingenuity of our Indians therefore must havegreatly exceeded the measure of their wants.]

Bishops who have presided in the island of Cuba.

1. Don Fray Juan de Ubite, a monk of theorder of St. Francis ; elected first bishop in 1525,and although not placed in the catalogue of thischurch by Gil Gonzalez Davila, he certainly pre-sided here as bishop.

2. Don Fray Bernardo de Mesa, of the orderofSt. Dominic, native of Toledo ; he died in 1538.

3. Den Fray Juan of Flanders, and native ofthis country, of the religious order of St. Do-minic ; he left the bishopric from being appointedconfessor to the queen of France, Dona Lconor ;succeeded by,

4. Don Fray Miguel Ramirez de Salamanca,native of Burgos, of the order of St. Dominic,master in his religion, preacher to the EmperorCharles V. collegian in the college of San Gre-gorio of Valladolid, regent in the university ofLobayna, and bishop of Cuba, in 1539.

5. Don F?'ay Diego Sarmiento, native of Bur-gos, a Carthusian monk, prior of the convent ofSanta Maria de las Cuevas of Seville ; electedbishop in 1540 : he renounced the bishopric afterhaving made the visitation of the whole island, andreturned to Spain.

6. Don Fernando de Urango, native of Azpeitiain Guipuzcoa, collegian of the college of St. Bar-tholomew in Salamanca, master and professor oftheology ; elected bishop in 1551; he died in1536.

7. Don Bernardino de Villalpando ; he governeduntil 1569.

8. Don Juan del Castillo, native of La Ordenin the bishopric of Burgos, collegiate of the col-lege of Sigiienza, and of that of St. Bartholomewin Salamanca, professor of arts ; elected bishop in1567 ; he goA^erned until 1580, Avhenhe renouncedhis functions, and returned to Spain.

9. Don Antonio Diaz de Salcedo, of the orderof St. Francis, collegiate of St. Clement of Bolonia,renoAvned for his virtues and letters ; elected in1580, through the renunciation of the former, andpromoted to the church of Nicaragua in 1597.

10. Don Fray Bartolome de la Plaza, of theorder of St. Francis, in the same year, until1602.

11. Don Fray Juan Cabezas, of the order of St.Dominic, native of Zamora ; he studied laAvs and

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canons in Salamatica, passed over to the Indies asvicar of the province of Santa Cruz in the Spapishisland, came to Spain at the general capitulation,and was elected bishop of Cuba in 1602 ; he at-tempted to translate the cathedral to the Havana,but did not succeed ; visited Florida, and waspromoted to the mitre of Guatemala in 1610.

12. Dm Fray Alonso Enriquez de Armendariz,of the order of Nuestra Senora de la Merced, na-tive of Navarra; was comendador of Granada,titular bishop of Sidonia, and nominated to Cubain 1610; he wrote, by order of the king, aspiritual and temporal relation of his bishopric,and w’as promoted to that of Mechoacan in 1624.

13. Don Fray Gregorio de Alarcon, of theorder of St. Augustin ; elected in the same year ;died in the voyage.

14. Don Leon de Cervantes, native of Mexico ;he studied in Salamanca, and was collegiate inthe university of Sigiienza, school-master in thechurch of Santa Fe, in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada, bishop of Santa Marta, and promoted to thissee in 1625, and from this to that of Guadalaxara,in 1631.

15. Don Fray Geronimo Manrique de Lara,of the order of Nuestra Sefiora de la Merced, twicecomendador of Olmedo, difinidor of the provinceof Castille, and master in sacred theology ; electedbishop of Cuba in 1631 ; he died in 1645.

16. Don Martin de Zelaya Ocarriz, in 1645.

17. Don Nicolas de la Torre, native of Mexico,first professor of theology in its university, fourlimes rector of the same, canon of that metropo-litan church, first chaplain of the college ofNuestra Senora de la Caridad, examiner-generalof the archbishopric, and visitor-general of theconvents ; presented to the bishopric of Cuba in1646 ; died in 1652.

18. Don Juan de Montiel, until 1656.

19. Don Pedro de Reyna Maldonado, nativeof Lima, a celebrated writer, who governed un-til 1658.

20. Don Juan de Santa Matia Saenz de Ma-nosca, native of Mexico, inquisitor of that capi-tal ; elected in 1661, promoted to the church ofGuatemala in 1667.

21. Don Fray Bernardo Alonso de los Rios, ofthe order of La Trinidad Calzada, until 1670.

22. Don Gabriel Diaz Vara and Caldron, until1674.

23. Don Juan Garcia de Palacios, until 1680.

24. Don Fray Baltasar de Figueroa y Guinea,a Bernard ine monk, until 1683.

,25. Don Diego Ebelino dc Compostela, in 1685.

26. Don Fray Geronimo de Valdes, Basilicanmonk; elected, in 1703, bishop of Portorico, andpromoted to this in 1706.

27. Don Fray Francisco de Yzaguirre, of thereligious order of St. Augustin ; he governed until1730.

28. Don Fray Gaspar de Molina y Oviedo, ofthe order of St. Augustin ; elected in 1730, pro-moted before he took possession of the bishopricof Malaga to the government of the cogncil, andafterwards to the purple.

29. Don Fray J uan Laso de la Vega y Cansino.of the religious order of St. P'rancis ; elected in thesame year, 1730.

30. Don Pedro Agustin Morel de Santa Cruz ;he governed until 1753.

31. Don Santiago de Echavarria y Elquezaga,native of Cuba ; promoted to the bishopric of Ni-caragua in 1753.

Governors and Captains-general who have presidedin the island of Cuba.

1. Don Diego Velazquez, native of Cuellar,knight of the order of Santiago, a conqueror andsettler of this island, nominated by the AdmiralChristopher Columbus in 1511; he governedAvith great applause until his death, in 1524.

2. Manuel de Roxas, native of the same townas was his predecessor, on account of whose deathhe was nominated to the bishopric, and in remem-brance of the great credit he had acquired in theconquest of the island, receiving his appointmentat the hands of the audience of St. Domingo, andbeing confirmed in it by the emperor in 1525 ; hegoverned until 1538.

3. Hernando de Soto, who governed until1539.

4. The Licentiate Juan de Avila, until 1545.

5. The Licentiate Antonio de Chaves, until1547.

6. The Doctor Gonzalo Perez Angulo, until1549.

7. Diego Mazariegos, until 1554.

8. Garcia Osorio, until 1565.

9. Pedro Melendez de Aviles, until 1568.

10. Don Gabriel de Montalvo, until 1576.

11. The Captain Francisco Carreno, until1578.

12. The Licentiate Gaspar de Toro, until1580.

13. Gabriel de Lujan, until 1584.

14. The militia colonel Juan de Texeda, until1589.

15. Don Juan Maldonado Barrionuevo, until1596.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by JoshuaOB
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