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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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In its vicinity is a reservoir, formed of hewn stone, which serves at once to catch the waters as they come down from the sierra, and to conduct them to Tepcaca, three leagues N N W of its capital.

ACAXUCHITLAN the head settlement of the alcaldía mayor of Tulazingo, to the N E. It contains 406 Indian families, and is a curacy of the bishopric of La Puebla de los Angeles. Distant four leagues to the E of its capital.

ACAYUCA, the alcaldía mayor of Nueva España, and of the province of Goazacoalco. Its jurisdiction is very extended, and consists, for the most part, of places of a hot and moist temperature, but so fertile is it that it gives annually four crops of maize; and as there is no demand for this production in the other provinces, it follows, of course, that the Indians here are little given to industry. Indeed the ground never requires the plough, and the whole of their labours during the seedtime consist merely in smoothing the surface of the mountains, and in scratching up the ground with a pointed stick. It is at times infested by locusts, which destroy the plants and crops ; and having never been able to find a remedy against this evil, the inhabitants had recourse to the protection of the virgin of La Conception, which is revered in the head settlement of the district of the Chichimecas ; and it is said that, owing to her mediatory influence, the plague has been thought to diminish. This province is watered by the abundant river of the Goazacoalco. The settlements of this alcaldía are, Xocoteapa, Macayapa, Menzapa, Molocan, Theimanquillo, Tinantitlan, Chinameca, Zoconusco, Olutla, Otcapa, Pochutla, Ostitan, Cozolcaque, Ixhuatla, Macatepeque.

another, the capital of the above, situate on the coast of the N. sea. Its inhabitants are composed of 30 families of Spaniards, 296 of Indians, and 70 of Mustees and Mulattoes. It lies a little more than 100 leagues S E of Mexico. Lat. 17° 53' N Long. 94° 46' 30" W.

another, settlement in the alcaldía mayor of Pachuca, in the kingdom of Nueva España, annexed to the curacy of Tezayuca, and containing 100 Indian families.

Acacingo, the head settlement of the district of the alcaldía mayor of Tepcaca, situate in a plain of a mild temperature, and watered by two streams which run close to all the houses of the settlement, to the great comfort of the inhabitants. In the middle of the above plain there is a beautiful fountain, a convent of the religious order of St. Francis, a very ancient building, and some other buildings, which have been erected since the conquest of the country. The parish church is a piece of the most ancient architecture. The inhabitants are composed of 150 families of Spaniards, 104 of Mustees, 31 of Mulattoes, and 700 of Indians; 3 1/4 leagues E to the NE of its capital.

ACAZUTLA, a port of the S sea, on the coast of the province of the alcaldía mayor of Zuchitepec, in the kingdom of Guatemala, between the point of Los Remedios, and the settlement of Guapaca. [Lat. 14° 42' N Long. 90° 3'.]

ACCHA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru, situate on the skirt of a mountain, which has a prominence, seeming as though it were about to fall upon the settlement. This mountain is constantly dwindling away without any assignable cause. Lat. 13° 19 s. Long. 71° 13' W

ACCHA-AMANSAIA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru.

ACCHA-URINZABA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masque in Peru.

Aceites, a river of the province and government of Caraccas, in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the mountains, and enters the Orituco.

[ACCOCESAWS. The ancient town and principal place of residence of these Indians is on the W side of Colorado of Rio Rouge, about 200 miles S W of Nacogdoches, but they often change their place of residence for a season : being near the bay, they make great use of fish, oysters &c.; kill a great many deer, which are the largest and fattest in the province ; and their country is universally said to be inferior to no part of the province in soil, growth of timber, goodness of water, and beauty of surface; they have a language peculiar to themselves, but have a mode of communication by dumb signs, which they all understand: number about 80 men. Thirty or forty years ago, the Spaniards had a mission here, but broke it up, or moved it to Nacogdoches. They talk of resettling it, and speak in the highest terms,of the country.]

[ACCOMACK County, in Virginia, is situated on a peninsula, bounded N by Maryland, E by the ocean, and on the W by Chesapeak bay, and contains 13.959 inhabitants, including 4.262 slaves.]

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tlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor of Xochimilco, in the same kingdom. It contains 210 Indian families, including those of its wards.

ACUA, a river of the kingdom of Brazil, in the island of Joanes or Marajo. It runs s. s. e. and enters the large arm of the river of the Amozonas.

ACUIAPAN, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Zultcpec in Nueva Espana, situate between two craggy steeps, and annexed to the curacy of Temascaltepec. It contains 38 Indian families, who carry on a commerce by the dressing of hides of large and small cattle. Six leagues n. of its capital.

ACUILPA, a settlement of the head settlement of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. It is of a hot and moist temperature, abounding in grain, chia, (a white medicinal earth), seeds, and other productions, with which its inhabitants carry on a trade* These consist of 92 Indian families. It is a little more than three leagues from its head settlement.

ACUIO, a settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Cinaqua in Nueva Espana; of a hot temperature, and inhabited only by nine Indian families, whose commerce consists in collecting salt and wild wax. It belongs to the curacy of Tauricato, and in its district are 11 sugar mills, and seven pastures fit for the larger cattle, and which are so extensive and considerable as to employ in them 50 families of Spaniards, and 235 of Mustees, Mulattoes, and Negroes. 30 leagues towards the s. of its capital.

ACUL, a settlement of the island of St. Domingo, in the part possessed by the French; situate on the n. coast, on the shore of the port of Petit-Goave.

ACUL, another settlement in the same island, belonging also to the French; situate s. of the Llanos of the N.

ACUL another] settlement on the s. coast, upon the bay which forms the point of Abacu.

ACUL a river of the above island. It is small, and runs into the sea behind the point of Abacu.

ACULA, San Pedro de, a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cozamaloapan in Nueva Espana, situate upon a high hill, and bounded by a large lake of salubrious water, called by the Indians Puetla; which lake empties itself into the sea by the sand bank of Alvarado, and the waters of which, in the winter time, overflow to such a degree as nearly to inundate the country. It contains 305 Indian families, and is four leagues to the e. of its capital.

ACULEO, a lake of the kingdom of Chile, which empties itself into the river Maipo, famous for good fish, highly prized in the city of Santiago. It is three leagues in length, and in some parts one in breadth. It is in the district of the settlement of Maipo, of the province and corregimiento of Rancagua.

ACUMA, a river of the captainship of Seara in Brazil]]: it enters the sea between the lake Upieni and the cape of Las Sierras.

ACURAGU, Angoras, or Camosin, a river of the province and captainship of Seara in Brazil, which rises in the province of Pernambuco, runs n. for many leagues, and enters the sea between the points of Tortuga and Palmeras.

ACURAIP1TI, a river of the province and government of Paraguay, which runs s. s. e. and enters the Parana.

ACUTITLAN, a settlement of the head settlement of the district of Tepuxilco, and alcaldia mayor of Zultepec, in Nueva Espana. It contains 45 Indian families, who trade in sugar, honey, and maize, and many other of its natural productions. It is five leagues n. e. of its head settlement, and a quarter of a league from Acamuchitlan.

ACUTZIO, a settlement of the head settlement of Tiripitio, and alcaldia mayor of Valladolid, and bishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 136 families of Indians, and 11 of Spaniards and Mustees. There are six large cultivated estates in its district, which produce abundance of wheat, maize, and other seeds; and these estates keep in employ eight families of Spaniards, 60 of Mulattoes, and 102 of Indians, who have also under their care many herds of large and small cattle, which breed here. It is one league and a half s. of its head settlement.

ADAES, Nuestra Senora del Pilar de Los, a town and garrison of the province of Los Texas, or Nuevas Felipinas, and the last of these settlements, being upon the confines of the French colonies. It is of a mild temperature, very fertile,. and abounding in seeds and fruits, which the earth produces without any cultivation ; such as chesnuts, grapes, and walnuts. The garrison consisis of a captain and 57 men, for the defence of the Indian settlements lately converted by the missions belonging to the religious order of St, Francis. It is 215 leagues from its capital, and 576 from Mexico. Long. 93° 35'. Lat, 32° 9'.

ADAES, a lake of the above province, about five leagues broad, and 10 in circumference, forming a gulph, in which large ships can sail with ease. It is more than 180 fathoms deep, as was once proved, when it was found that aline of that length did not reach the bottom. It abounds in a variety offish, which are caught in vast quantities without nets ;

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CARTAGENA.

San Nicolas de laPaz,

San J uan de lasPalmas,

Pueblo Nuevo,Santero,

Lorica,

San Nicolas deBari,

San Bernardo A-bad,

Morales,

Babilla,

Tablada,

Tiquicio de Aden-tro,

Tiquicio de Afu-era,

Majagua,

Nechi,

San Marcos,

San Pelajo,

Zerete,

Zienega del Oro,San Carlos de Co-losina.

San Geronimo deBuenavista.

The capital is a large city adorned with beauti-ful buildings, founded by Pedro de Heredia in1533, on the shore of a great and very convenientbay more than two leagues in length. It was call-ed Calamari in the time of the Indians, which sig-nifies, in their language, the land of craw-fish, fromthe abundance of these found in it. It is situateon a sandy island, which forming a narrow strait,gives a communication to the part called TierraBomba ; on the left it is entered by a woodenbridge, having a suburb called Xiximani, whichis another island uniting with the continent bymeans of a bridge in the same manner as itself.It is well fortified, and is the residence of a go-vernor, with the title of captain-general, dependenton the viceroy of Santa Fe, having beeu indepen-dent till the year 1739. Besides the precinct andbastions, it has a half-moon, which defends theentrance or gate ; and at a small distance is thecastle of San Felipe de Baraxas, situate on aneminence, and on the side of the bay the castles ofSan Luis, Santa Cruz, San Joseph, San P'elipe,and Pastelillo, which were rebuilt in a modernmanner, in 1654;, by the Lieutenant-general DonIgnacio de Sala, with the names of San Fernando,San Joseph, El Angel, and El Pastelillo. Thecathedral church is magnificent, and included in itis the parish of Sagrario, besides two other pa-rishes called La Trinidad and Santo Toribo. Ithas the convents of monks of St. Francisco, St.Domingo, St. Augustin, St. Diego, La Merced,and San Juan de Dios, which is an hospital, andsituate at the top of a high mountain without thewalls of the city, at a quarter of a league’s dis-tance from the convent of the barefooted Augustins,called Nuestra Senora de la Popa ; to this con-vent vessels are accustomed to offer up a salutationas soon as they discover it at sea. It has also acollege which belonged to the society of Jesuits,a convent of Santa Clara, one of the Observersof San Francisco, and another of barefooted Car-

melites. At a small distance without the city isthe hospital of San Lazaro for lepers, which ma-lady is epidemical in the country. It has also atribunal of the inquisition, established in 1610, ofwhich there is only three in all America, and put-tingthis city, in this pointof view, onafooting withthe metropolitan cities Lima and Mexico. It is thehead of a bishopric erected in 1534 by his holinessClement VII. The bay abounds in fish of variouskinds, but it is infested by marine wolves. Theclimate of this city is very hot ; from May to No-vember, which are the winter months, thunder,rain, and tempests are very frequent, but fromthis inconvenience they derive an advantage offilling with water their cisterns, called aijibes, andwhich afford them the only supply of this inostnecessary article ; accordingly every house is fur-nished with one of these cisterns : from Decemberto April, which is the summer, the heat is exces-sive, occasioning continual perspiration, whichdebilitates the frame, and causes the inhabitants tohave a pale and unhealthy appearance, althoughthey nevertheless enjoy good health, it being notunusual to find amongst them persons exceeding80 years of age. The irregularity of this climateproduces several very afflicting disorders, as theblack vomit, which is most common amongststrangers and sea-faring people, few of whom havethe luck to escape it, but no person ever has ittwice. The inhabitants are likewise much trou-bled with the leprosy, or disease of St. Lazarus ; theculebrilla, which is an insect which breeds under theskin, and causes a swelling which is accustomed toterminate in gangrene and spasms or convulsions :besides these inconveniences, there are multitudesof troublesome insects which infest the houses,such as beetles, niguas, scorpions, centipeds, andmorcielagos. The largest trees are the caob, thecedar, the maria, and balsam ; of the first aremade canoes, out of the solid trunk, for fishing andcommerce ; the red cedar is better than the white,and the two last, not to mention their utility fromthe compactness of their timber, for their delicioussmell and beautiful colour, are the trees fromwhence are procured those admirable distillationscalled the oil of Maria and balsam of Tolu. Hereare also tamarind trees, medlars, sapotas, papai/as,cassias, and Indian apple trees, producing deli-cate and pleasant fruits ; the fruit, however, of thelast mentioned is poisonous, and many who, de-ceived by the beauty of these apples, have therashness to taste them, soon repent of their folly,for they immediately swell to a distressing degree :so if perchance any one should sleep under itsbranches, he will be afflicted in the same way.

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tive of Barcelana, a celebrated engineeer; also re-nowned in the constructing of the land-gate or en-trance to Cadiz : he was promoted to this govern-ment for the purpose of inspecting and repairingthe towers which had been destroyed by AdmiralVernon, which commission, after he had executed,he returned to Spain in 1755, and died director-general of the body of engineers.

61. Don Fernando Morillo Velarde, knight ofthe order of Alcantara, colonel of infantry, at thattime king’s lieutenant, when he received the go-vernment on account of the proprietor having goneto fortify the town of Portobelo.

62. Don Diego Tabares, knight of the order ofSantiago, brigadier-general ; promoted to this go-vernment from that of Camana in 1755, and go-verned till 1761, when arrived his successor,

63. Don Joseph de Sobremonte, Marquis of thisname, a brigadier, who was captain of the regimentof Spanish guards when he was nominated : he go-verned till 1770, when he died.

64. Don Gregorio de Sierra, also captain of gre-nadiers of the express regiment of Spanish guards ;he entered Cartagena in 1771, and died in 1774.

65. Don Juan Pimienta, colonel of the regi-ment of the infantry of Zamora, in rank a briga-dier, and knight of the distinguished order ofCharles III. ; he entered into the possession of thegovernment in 1774, and died in 1781.

66. Don Roque de Quiroga, king’s lieutenant ofthe fortified town, or Plaza ; promoted as provincialgovernor through the death of his antecessor, un-til arrived, under the king’s appointment, the pro-prietor,

67. Don Joseph de Carrion y Andrade, a bri-gadier, who before had been governor of thePlaza of Manilla, and had rendered himself re-nowned when it was besieged by the Emperor ofMarruecos, being nominated to this government in1774 : he died in 1785.

Cartagena, a river of the province and go-vernment of Choco : it rises in the mountains ofthis province nearthe settlement of Noanama, andenters the sea imimediately at the cape of Corri-entes.

Cartagena, a plain of the province and cor-regimiento of Maule in the kingdom of Chile,close to the port of San Antonio.

CARTAGO, a city of the province and go-vernment of Popayan, founded by the BrigadierGeorge Robledo in 1540, who gave it this name,with the dedicatory title of San Juan, his patron;the greater part of the military in it having comefrom the city of Cartagena in Europe. It did liebetween the rivers Otun and Quindio; but the

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continual invasions it has experienced from thePijaos and Pimaes Indians, who are a bold andwarlike people, determined its inhabitants to re-move it at the end of the I7th century to the spotwhere it now stands ; having bought for that pur-pose some land of Tomasa Izquierdo, on the bankof an arm of the river of La Vieja, which is alarge stream, and navigable for canoes and rafts,and which is at the distance of rather better thana quarter of a mile from the large river Cauca,into which the above river enters, forming beforethe city an island, which abounds in animals of thechase, and in cattle, and having on its banks ex-cellent fishing. This city is of a dry and healthyclimate ; and although hot, the atmosphere is al-ways clear and serene. It is situate upon a leveland somewhat elevated plain , of beautiful appear-ance ; the streets are spacious, wide and straight.It has a very large grand square. Its buildingsare solid and of good structure, and universallyroofed over with straw, having, however, the wallsof solid stone from the top to the bottom ; othersare built of brick, and others with rafters of wood,the walls being of clay, (which they call imbulidoSyor inlaid), so solid as to resist the force of the mostviolent earthquakes, as was experienced in onethat happened in 1785. At a small distance fromthe city are various lakes or pools of water, whichthey call denegas, formed by nature, assisted byart. It is the residence of the lieutenant-gover-nor of the government of Popayan, of two ordi-nary alcaldes, two of La Hermandad, two member*of an inferior court, a recorder, a procurator-gene-ral, a major domo de propiosy and six regidors^the cabildo enjoying the privilege of electing andconfirming these officers yearly. It has also a bat-talion of city militia, and two disciplined compa-nies ; also some royal cofiers, which were broughtfrom the city of Anserma. Besides the church ofMatriz, in which is venerated, as the patroness, theHoly Virgin, under the image of Nuestra Senorade la Paz, (this being the pious gift of PhilipIII.) it has five parishes, viz. Santa Ana, SantaBarbara, Llano de Buga, Naranjo, Micos, andPueblo de los Cerritos. The territory is extremelyfertile and pleasant, abounding as well in fruitsand pulse as in birds of various sorts ; and in nopart whatever are plantains so various, or of sofine a quality. Tlie coffee is good, and the cacao,which is of two sorts, is excellent, and is calledyellow and purple hayna. Of no less estimationis the tobacco, with which a great traffic wasformerly carried on at Choco. The district of thiscity abounds in trees, medicinal herbs and fruits,and in an exquisite variety of cacao plants; also

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(country of the Iroquees Indians. It is handsomeand well built, on the margin of the river of thesame name, about 12 or 15 miles s. w. from Mont-real, and n. of St. John’s fort. It was taken bythe Americans, Oct. 20, 1775, and retaken by theBritish, Jan. 18, 1776. Lat. 45° 26' w.)

CHAMBO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito.

Chambo, a very large river, which rises nearthe former settlement, and runs with such rapiditythat it cannot be forded ; is consequently passedover by means of various bridges made of osiers.

CHAME, a settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Natá in the province and kingdom of TierraFirme ; situate near a river, and two leagues fromthe coast of the S. sea. It produces maize, plan-tains, and other fruits ; swine, fowl, turkeys, andother birds, with which it supplies, by means ofcanoes, the markets of the city of Panama, fromwhence it is nine leagues distant.

CHAMELUCON, or Chamaleton, a river ofthe province and government of Honduras. Itruns n. and enters the sea in the gulf of this name,between La Caldera and the river Ulua.

CHAMETLA, a settlement of the alcaldiamayor of Guajuaha in Nueva España. It con-tains ISO families of Indians.

CHAMETLAN, a province and alcaldia mayorof Nueva España, also called Del Rosario ; bound-ed n. by the province of Culiacan, s. by that of Xa-lisco or Sentipac, e. and n. e. by that of Zacate-cas and Nueva Galicia, and w. by the S. sea ; is30 leagues long from e. to w. and 25 wide n. s. ;is of, a very hot temperature, and the greater partof it is a mountainous and rugged country, abound-ing in. noxious animals and insects, and on thisaccount uninhabitable in the summer and in therainy season. It was conquered by Don Juan deIbarra in 1554, has many mines of silver and gold,which were formerly worked, but which at presentare all abandoned, as well from their having filledwith water, as from the scantiness of the means ofthe inhabitants to work them. The royal mines,however, are productive of some emolument, andare in fafct the support of the place. It producessome maize, and much tobacco , and cotton, towhich article the soil is exactly suited, though notso to wheat, which yields here but sparingly. Onthe banks of the lakes formed by the sea, is left athick incrustation of salt in the month of April ;and although the inhabitants spare no pains to col-lect this valuable commodity, yet abundance of itis lost from the Avant of hands to collect it ere theheats come on, when it very quickly disappears.

Some large cattle are bred here. It is very badlypeopled, or, to speak more truly, it is as it weredesert, having only three settlements and someestates. It is irrigated by a river which flowsdown from the sierra Madre, and passes throughthe capital, the waters of which are made usefulfor the working of the mines. The same river entersthe sea two leagues from the settlement of Chamet-lan, and has abundance of fish, which are caughtwith ease, as well upon its shores as in marsheswhich it forms. Tlie capital, which is the resi-dence of the alcalde mayor, is the real del Ro-sario.

Chametlan, a settlement of the former alcaldíamayor ; from thence taking its name. It containsonly five or six Indians, and some Spaniards, Mus-tees, and Mulattoes, who, the greater part of theyear, live in the estates which they have for thebreeding of large cattle, and on the farms for thecultivation of maize and cotton.

CHAMESA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; annexed to the curacy of Nopsa. Itis of a cold temperature, and produces the fruitscorresponding to such a climate, particularlywheat, which is of the best quality. It contains100 Avhite inhabitants, and as many Indians, andis a little more than eight leagues from its ca-pital.

CHAMI, San Juan de, a settlement of theprovince and government of Chocó ; situate in thedistrict of Thatama, near the ruins of the city ofSan Juan de Rodas, to the w. of the city of San-tiago de Arma.

CHAMIANOS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Mainas in the kingdom ofQuito; situate on the shore of the river Gual-laga.

CHAMICUROS, S. Francisco Xavier de,a settlement of the missions which were held by theregulars of the company of Jesuits, in the provinceand government of Mainas, of the kingdom ofQuito ; founded in 1670 by the Father LorenzoLucero. '

CHAMILPA, San Lorenzo de, a settlementof the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cuer-navaca in Nueva España.

CHAMPANCHIN, Sierra de, a chain ofmountains in the province and government of Tu-cumán, running s, s.e. on the shore of the riverQuarto.

(CHAMPLAIN,a township, the most n. in Clin-ton county, New York, which takes its name fromthe lake on which it lies. It was granted to someCanadian and Nova Scotia refugees, who were

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and pleasantly situated. Before the deslrnction oftil is town by the British in 1775, several brandiesof mannfadures were carried on to great advan-tage, some of which have been since revived : par-ticularly tlic manufacture of pot and pearl ashes,ship-building, rum, leather in all its branches,silver, tin, brass, and pewter. Three rope-walkshave lately been erected in this town, and tlie in-crease of its houses, population, trade, and naviga-tion, have been very great within a few' years past.This town is a port of entry in conjunction withBoston. At the head of the neck there is a bridgeover Mystic river, which connects Charlestown withMalden.)

CHARLESTOWN, another city of the island ofNevis, one of the Caribes, in the Antilles ; in w Inchthere are beautiful houses and shops well providedwith every thing ; is defended by a fort calledCharles. It has a market every Saturday, begin-ning at sun-rise and finishing at mid-day, whitherthe Negroes bring 'maize, names, garden-herbs,fruits, &c. In the parish of San Juan is a pieceof sulphureous land, in the upper extremity of anopening of the land, called Solfatara, or Sulphurgut, which is so hot as to be telt through the solesof the shoes when being trodden upon. At thefoot of the declivity of this same part of the city,is a small hot stream, called the Bath, which beingsupposed to rise from the aforesaid spot, loses itselfshortly in the sand. Towards the side lying nextthe sea are two fountains, one of hot water, theother of cold, and of these two are formed the lakeof Blackrock, the waters of which are of a moderatewarmth, and which lies to the n. of the city, beingnearly a quarter of a mile’s distance from the placewhere are caught eels and silver-fish, resemblingthe cod and slimgut in flavour, the latter of whichlias a head disproportioned to its body. [A prodi-gious piece ol Nevis mountain falling down in anearthquake several years ago, left a large vacuity,which is still to be seen. The altitude of thismountain, taken by a quadrant from Charlestownbay, is said to be a mile and a half perpendicular ;and from the said bay to the top, four miles. Thedeclivity from this mountain to the town is verysteep half-way, but afterwards easy of ascent.] InLat. 17° 8' u. and long. 62° 40' w.

Charlestown, another city of the island ofBarbadoes ; the situation of which is two leaguesfrom that of San Miguel. It has a good port de-fended by two castles ; the one beyoml the other,and both commanding the city and the road: inthe middle of them is a platform. Tlse inhabitantscarry on a great trade with the other islands.

(CHARLESTOWN, a township in Montgomery

county. New York, on the s. side of Mohawk river,about 32 miles w. of Schenectady. By the statecensus of 1796, 456 of the inhabitants are elec-tors.)

(Charlestown, a township in Mason county,Kentucky ; situate on the Ohio, at the mouth ofLauren’s creek. It contains but few houses, andis six miles n. of Washington, and 60 n. e. of Lex-ington. Lat. 38° 28' n.)

(Charlestown, a township in Chester county,Pennsylvania.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, on the e. side of Connecticutriver, 30 miles s. of Dartmouth college, upwards of70 n. of Northampton, 116 n. of w. of Boston, 120w. by 71. of Portsmouth, and 431 n. n. e. of Phila-delphia. It was incorporated in 1753, and con-tains 90 or 100 houses, a Congregational church,a court-house, and an academy. The road fromBoston to Quebec passes through this town. Lat.43° 16' n. Long. 72° 23' w. A small internaltrade is carried on here.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cecil county,Maryland, near the head of Chesapeak bay ; sixmites e. n. e. from the mouth of Susquehannahriver, 10 zo. s. w. from Elktown, and 50 s. w. by zb.from Philadelphia. Here are about 20 houses,chiefly inhabited by fishermen employed in theherring fishery. Lat. 39° 36' w.)

(Charlestown, a district in the lower countryof S. Carolina, subdivided into 14 parishes. Thislarge district, of which the city of Charleston is thechief town, lies between Santee and Combaheerivers. It pays 21,473/. 14s. 6d. sterling, taxes. Itsends to the state legislature 48 representatives and13 senators, and one member to congress. It con-tains 66,986 inhabitants, of whom only 16,352 arefree.)

(Charlestown, a village in Berkley county,Virginia ; situate on the great road leading fromPhiladelphia to Winchester ; eight miles fromShepherdstown, and 20 from Winchester.)

(Charlestown, a township in Washingtoncounty, Rhode Island state, having the Atlanticocean on the s. and separated from Richmond on the71. by Charles river, a water of Fawcatiick. Some ofits ponds empty into Fawcatiick river, otliers intothe sea. It is 19 miles /L ti:;. of Newport, andcontains 2022 inhabitants, including 12 slaves. Afew years ago there w'ere about 500 Indians in thestate ; the greater part of them resided in tin's town-ship. They are peaceable and well disposed togovernment, and s|5cak the English language.)

CHARLETON, an island situate near the e.coast of the country of Labrador, in the part of N.

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Cotagaitilla,Escara,Chacnacocha,Chequelti,Colnaca,Calccha,Tomola,Tumula,Estarca,

Tupisa,

Oploca,

Tatasi,

Ingenio del Oro

Nueva Cbocaya,Talina,

Verque,

Chacapa,

Clioroma,

Libilibi,

Moraya,

Moxo,

Tojo,

Sococha,

Remedios,

Chisloca,

Suipacha.

And in the district of Tarija,

Tarija de Vieja, La Concepcion,

San Bernardo de Tarija, Berraeo.

The district of Tarija is a territory full of que-hradas and craggy mountains, as far as the punasand lofty plains of Escayache and Tacsora, wherethere are two salt lakes. It is composed of fourfertile valleys lying on the skirts of hills, and inthese are found human bones of a prodigious size,petrified, shin-bones of a yard and a quarter long,and teeth larger than a fist. In the midst of one ofthese valleys is the town of San Bernardo de Tarija,which is the capital of the province. Its reparti-miento used to amount to 82,350 dollars, and itsalcavala to 558 dollars per annum. For the settle-ments of this district, see above.

Chichas, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Condesuyos de Arequipa in thesame kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Sala-manca.

Chichas, a river of the province and govern-ment of Tucumán, in the district and jurisdictionof the city of Xuxuy, which divides this city fromthat of the capital of San Miguel.

(CHICHESTER, Upper and Lower, twotownships in Delaware county, Pennsylva-nia.)

(Chichester, a small township in Rocking-ham county, New Hampshire, about 35 miles n. w.of Exeter, and 45 from Portsmouth. It lies onSuncook river, was incorporated in 1727, andcontains 491 inhabitants.)

CHICHIBACOA, Cabo de, a cape on thecoast of the province and government of SantaMarta, and kingdom of Tierra Firrae ; 80 leaguesto the w. of that city.

CHICHICAPA, a settlement and capital of thealcaldia mayor of the province and bishopric ofOaxaca in Nueva Espana. It is of a mild tem-perature, and was anciently the real of the mostesteemed silver mines; but is at present muchfallen of, the working of the mines having been for

the most part abandoned from the want of hands,in as much as the natives have given themselvesup to the trade of cochineal, in which its territoryabounds : it produces also much seed and maize.Its jurisdiction includes some of the finest andrichest provinces. It consists of five head settle-ments of districts, to which are subject as manyother. Its capital contains 430 families of Indians,and some of Spaniards, Muslees, and Mulattoes.Ninety leagues s. e. of Mexico. The other settle-ments are.

Zimitlan,Tepezimatlan,La Magdalena,Atzozola.

Rio Hondo or Thequila,

San Agustin de Losi-

cha,

Tetipai,

Cozan tepee,

CHICHICATEPEC, a settlement and head set-tlement of the alcaldia mayor of Villalta in NuevaEspana, is of a cold temperature, contains 26 fa-milies of Indians, and is seven leagues to the s. e.of its capital.

CHICHICOAUTLA, St. Francisco de, asettlement and head settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Metepeque in Nueva Espana. It contains 91families of Indians.

CHICHIMEQUILLA, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district of Zitaquaro, and alcaldiamayor Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoacanand kingdom of Nueva Espana. It contains 84families of Indians, and is a quarter of a league tothe s. of its head settlement.

CHICHIQUILA, a settlement of the head set-tlement of Quinuxtlan, and alcaldia mayor of SanJuan de los Llanos, in Nueva Espana. It contains180 families of Indians.

CHICHOI, a settlement of the province andkingdom of Guatemala.

CHICHOPON, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Xuambos.

CHICIBICHE, a point of the coast of the pro-vince and government of Venezuela, opposite theisland of Aves.

(CHICKAHOMINY, a small navigable riverin Virginia. At its mouth in James river, 37miles from point Comfort, in Chesapeak bay, is abar, on which is only 12 feet water at commonflood tide. Vessels passing that may go eightmiles up the river; those of 10 feet draught 12miles ; and vessels of six tons burden may go 32miles up the river.)

(CHICKAMACOMICO Creek, in Dorchestercounty, Maryland, runs s. between the towns ofMiddletown and Vienna, and empties into Fishingbay.)

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or country of Labrador. It runs s. e, and entersthe St. Lawrence.

CODEGO. See Tierra Bomba.

CODEHUE, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Rancagna, in the kingdom ofChile, to the e. of the town of Triana.

CODERA, Cabo de, a cape on the coast ofthe province and government of Venezuela. Lat.10° S5'. Long. 66° 10'.

[CODORUS, a township in York county,Pennsylvania.]

CODOSA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Tucumán in Peru; situate on theshore of the river Quarto, and at the head of thesierra of Campanchin.

COELCHO, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Chachapoyas in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Chiliquia.

COELLO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Neiva in the Nuevo Reyno de Gra-nada ; situate on the shore of the large river Mag-dalena.

COEMAL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Luya, the capital.

COEURS, Bay of, bay in the island of Martinique, one of the Antilles. It is near the settle-ment of Carbet.

[COEYMANS, a township in Albany county.New York, 12 miles below Albany. By the statecensus of 1796, S89 of its inhabitants are electors.]

COFANES, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe kingdom of Quito, Avhich began to be con-verted to the Catholic religion in 1602, throughthe labour and zeal of the Father Rafael Ferrer,of the extinguished company of the Jesuits, andwho was killed by the same Indians. The princi-pal settlement, founded by this martyr, with thededicatory title of San Pedro, is now almost de-stroyed, though some few inhabitants still remain.The same is situate between the river of its nasneto the n. and that of Azuela to the s. The aboveriver is large and rapid, anti takes its name fromthese Indians. It rises in the sierra Nevada, orSnowy, runs from u. to c. and enters the Azuela,in lat. 13° n.

COFFIN-LAND, a small island of the coastof Georgia, and one of those which are calledGeorgican, at the entrance of the river Ashley.

COFRE, a small river of the province and go-vernment of Buenos Aires. It runs s. and entersthe sea between the rivers Favor and Del Rosario,opposite the capital.

COGUA, a settlement of the corregimiento ofZipaguira in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Itis of a very cold temperature, and abounds in theproductions peculiar to its climate, particularlyin fire-wood, with which it supplies, for the ma-nufacturing of salt, the settlements of Nemoconand Zipaquira. To this last settlement it is verycontiguous ; and it lies nine leagues n, of SantaFe. Its population is reduced to 70 housekeepers,and as many other Indians.

COHANZY, a river of the province andcolony of New Jersey, in the county of Cumberland.It runs s. and enters the sea in the bay of Delaware.

[CoHANZY, or Casaria, a small river,which rises in Salem county. New Jersey, andrunning through Cumberland county, empties intoDelaware river, opposite the upper end of Bombayhook. It is about SO miles in length, and is na-vigable for vessels of 100 tons to Bridgetown, 20miles from its mouth.]

COHASSER, a settlement of the province andcolony of New Hampshire, to the e. of the lakeChamplain.

[COHASSET, a township in Norfolk county,Massachusetts, which was incorporated in 1770,and contains 817 inhabitants. It has a Congrega-tional church, and 126 houses, scattered on dif-ferent farms. Cohasset rocks, which have been sofatal to many vessels, lie oft' this town, about aleague from the shore. It lies 25 miles s. e. ofBoston, but in a straight line not above half thedistance.]

[COHGNAWAGA, a parish in the townshipof Johnstown, Montgomery county. New York,on the ay. side of Mohawk river, 26 miles w. ofSchenectady. This place, which had been settlednear SO years, and which was the seat of Sir Wil-liam Johnson, was mostly destroyed by the Bri-tish and Indians, under the command of Sir Wil-liam in the year 1780; in this action Johnsonevinced a want of feeling which would have dis-graced a savage. The people destroyed in thisex[)cdition were his old neighbours, with whomhe had formerly lived in the habits of friendship ;his estate was among them, and the inhabitantshad always considered him as their friend andneighbour. These unfortunate people, after see-ing their houses and property consumed to ashes,were hurried, such as could walk, into cruel cap-tivity ; those who could not Avalk fell victims tothe toraaliawk and scalping knife. See Caghna-w aga.]

[COllOEZ, or the Falls, in Mohawk river, be-tween two and three miles from its mouth, and 10miles n. of Albany, are a very great natural curio-sity. The river above the falls is about 300 yardswide, and approaches them from the n. w. in a

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21. Don Fray Pedro de Espineira ; elected in1762 ; he governed until his death, in 1778.

22. Don Francisco Joseph de Maran ; electedin 1779.

Concepcion de la Vega, another city, inthe island of St. Domingo, founded by the AdmiralChristopher Columbus, on a beautiful and spaciousplain, or Uanura^ celebrated for a conquest gainedon it by a numerous army of Indians. It has a goodparish church, erected into a bishopric, and wliichwas afterwards done away with in 1605, it beingthen embodied with the archbishopric of S. Do-mingo. it has also a convent of the religiousorder of St. Francis, in which is deposited andvenerated the first cross that the discoverer and con-queror of this country planted here ; which, al-though the Indians have endeavoured with all theirmight to break and destroy, has resisted all theireftbrts. Twenty-five leagues from the capital ofS. Domingo.

(Concepcion, a town of the province and go-vernment of Paraguay ; situate on the e. side ofthe river Paraguay, about SO leagues n. of Asun-cion. Lat. 23'^ 23' 8" s. Long. 57° 16" <®.)

(Concepcion del Pao, a city of the provinceand government of Caracas ; composed of the in-habitants of Trinity, of Margareta, and of Caracas,who owned the folds in the plains near the Ori-noco, to the s. of Barcelona ; they here succes-sively fixed their dwellings, for the purpose ofbeing in the centre of their property, and of super-intending it themselves. In 1744 the number ofthese houses were found considerable enough to ac-quire the name of village. There are only 2300people of all classes here, subsisting will] facilityby Ihe fertility of the soil. The air and water aregood, and the only inconveniences the inhabitantsexperience are an excessive lieat, and inundationsarising from the long and heavy rains. The produceof the land is merely the provisions common to theCQuntry. The wealth of the inhabitants consistsentirely in cattle, which they export to Trinity,liia Guarapiche or Orinoco, This village, nowa city, is distinguished from St.John the Baptistdel Pao, situate in the province of Venezuela, bythe title of Concepcion del Pao. Lat. 8° 42' n.Long. 65° 10' ra.)

Concepcion, a settlement, the capital of theprovince and corregiwicnlo of Xauja in Peru.

Concepcion, another, of tlie same province andcorregimiento, in which there is a convent of thereligious order of St. Francis.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimknto of Lucanas in the same kingdom ; an-nexed to the curacy of Otoca.

Concepcion, another, of the same province andkingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Paraisancos.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimiento of Chichas and Tarija in the same king-dom, and of the district of the former.

Concepcion, another, of the province and cor-regimienlo of Vilcas Huaiman in the same king-dom ; annexed to the curacy of Vizchongo.

Concepcion, another, of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Leon in Nueva Espana, andof the bishopric of Mechoacan ; annexed to thecuracy of Rincon. It contains 208 families of In-dians, 100 of Spaniards, and ^0 oi Mustees. Itproduces wheat, maize, and other seeds, and is aquarter of a league from its curacy, and fourleagues from the capital.

Concepcion, another small settlement or ward,united to that of Tequiszillan, of ihealcaldia mayorof Theotihuacan in the same kingdom.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichare held by the religious order of St. Francis, inthe province of Texas and kingdom of Nueva Es-pana. It is 112 leagues to the e. n. e. of the pre-sidency of San Antonio de Bejar.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province and government of Mainas,of the kingdom of Quito ; situate on the shore ofthe great river Maranon, on a point of land formedby the same, and where this river is entered by theApena and the Guallaga,

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichwere held by the regulars of the company of Je-suits, in the province of Tepeguana, and kingdomof Nueva Vizcaya; situate on the bank of theriver Florido, near the settlement and real of themines of Parral.

Concepcion, another, of the missions whichbelong to the religion of St. Francis, in the pro-vince of Taraumara, and kingdom of Nueva Viz-caya, lying 17 leagues distant between the s. ands. w. of the real of the mines of San Felipe de Chi-guagua.

Concepcion, another, with the surname ofAchaguas, being composed of Indians of this na-tion, in the kingdom of Granada ; of the missionswhich were held by the regulars of the companyof Jesuits in Orinoco; situate on the shore of theriver Meta.

Concepcion, another settlement, the capital ofthe province and captainship of Itamaraca in Bra-zil ; situate on the top of a mountain by the sea-side. It has a magnificeut parish church, and isgarrisoned by two companies of troops, it con-tains 300 housekeepers, and has three large sugar.

\

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same kingdom. It contains 180 families of In-dians, and 60 of Spaniards, Mustees, and Mulattoes.Here is an hospital of the religious order of St.Francis. Seven leagues from its capital.

(COXHALL, a township in York county, dis-trict of Maine, containing 775 inhabitants.)

COXIMAR, a large plain of the coast of theisland of Cuba, close by the city of Havana, inwhich is a fortified tower. On this plain the Eng-lish drew up their troops when they besieged thatplace, in 1762.

COXIMES, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito ; situate on the sliore of the S. sea, on thepoint formed by the port Palmar, under the equi-noctial line.

COXO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Venezuela ; situate on the sea-coast,close to the settlement of Carvalleda.

(COXSAKIE, a township in the w. part ofAlbany county, New York, containing S406 in-habitants, of whom 302 are slaves. Of the citi-zens 613 are electors.)

COXUMATLAN, a settlement of the headsettlement of Zanguio and afcaldia mayor of Za-mora in Nueva Espana ; situate on the shore of thesea of Chapala, and being backed by a large moun-tain covered with fruit-trees of various kinds, andexcellent timber and woods. It contains 17 tami-lies of Indians, who employ themselves in fishingand in agriculture. Four leagues to the w. of itshead settlement.

COYAIMAS, a barbarous and ancient nationof Indians of the province and government of Po-payán in the kingdom of Quito, and district of thetownofNeiba. Tliese Indians are valorous, ro-bust, faithful, and enemies to the Pijaos. Someof tl)ern have become converted to the Catholicfaith, and liveuniteil in settlemenis.

(COYAU, a settlement on Tennessee river, SOmiles below Knoxville.)

COYONES, a barbarous nation of Indians, whoinhabit the s. w. of Tocuyo. They are ferociousand infidels, and live upon the mountains. Theirnumbers at the present day are much reduced.

COYPO. SeeRAi.EMo.

COZAL, a settlement of the province and alcaldiamayor of Zacapula in the kingdom of Guatemala.

COZALCAQUE, San Felipe de, a settlementof the head settlement of Tenantitlan, and alcaldiamayor of Acaynca, in Nueva Espana. It contains51 families of Indians, and is 10 leagues to the e.and one-fourth to the a. e, of its head settlement.

COZAMALOAPAN, a province and alcaldiaviayor of Nueva España, the capital of which

bears the same name, with the dedicatory title ofSan Martin, and which is situate on a plain half aleague long, and somewhat less broad, surroundedby mountains so knit together, that, at the time ofits foundation, passes were obliged to be o[>ened.Through this province runs a river, which flowsdown from the sferTflA of Zongolica, and whichafterwards takes the nam.e of Alvarado, it is ofa hot and moist temperature, and continually ex-posed to inundations during the rainy seasons,owing to the immense overflowings of the rivers.Its population is composed of 38 families of Spa-niards, 128 of Mulattoes, and 34 of Mexican In-dians, who maintain themselves by the gatheringof cotton and maize ; and this last in such abun-dance as to supply Vera Cruz. The Spaniardsemploy themselves in fishing in the rivers, whichabound with fish the three last months of the year,and they carry them for sale into the other juris-dictions. It has, besides the parish church, atemple of superior architecture, dedicated toNuestra Seilora de la Soledad, though it be com-monly called, Of Cozomalotipan, being of suchancient origin as to be said to liave existed 12years before the conquest of the kingdom. Thistemple was inhabited by a religious fraternity, ap-proved by his holiness Gregory XIII. he havinggranted to the same many favours and indulgences,which, through the devotion of the communily,were perpetuated, through several prodigies andmiracles which afterwards took place in the set-tlement, and in its district. One hundred andfifteen leagues s. s.xo. of Mexico, in lat. 17^ 47' ;long. 274° 50'. The jurisdiction of this alcaldiaconsists in the folloAving settlements :

A rnatlnn,Acula,

Ixmaluliacan,Chacaltiaiiguis,Texliuacaii,Tlacotalpan,

Otatitlan,

Tuxtepec,

Chinantla,

Utzila,

Uzainacin,

A^etla.

COZAQUl, Santa Maria de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Acazingo and alcaldiamayor of Tepeaca, in Nueva Espana. It containsfour families of Spaniards, 33 Aluslees and Mu-lattocs, and 51 of Indians. It is a quarter of aleague lioni its head settlement.

COZATLA, San Juan de, a settlement of thehead settlement of Axixique, and ahaldia mayor ofZayula, in the same kingdom. It contains 60familie.s of Indians,its head settlement.

COZAUTEPEC, a settlement and head settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Chichicapain Nu-eva Espana, of the province and bishopric of3

iid is two leagues to the w. of

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island of Cuba, called Cruz del Principe (Cross ofthe Prince. )

CUA, Sahante de, a village and settlementof the Portuguese, in the kingdom of Brazil ;situate in the sierra of Los Corixes, between theriver of this name and that of Araguaya.

CUACHIMALCO, a settlenaent of the headsettlement of Olinala, and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa,in Nueva Espana. It contains 06 families of In-dians, and is two leagues to the n. e. of its headsettlement.

CUAITLAN, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Metlatlan, <x\\A. alcaldia mayor of [Papantla]],inNueva Espana. It contains 8i families of In-dians, and is three leagues from its head settle-ment, 16 s. w. of the capital.

CUALA, Santiago de, a settlement and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofTezcoco in Nueva Espana; annexed to the cu-racy of Capulalpa, and six leagues to the n. e. ofits capital.

CUALAQUE, a scttlerneut of the head settle-ment and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in NuevaEspana. It contains two families of Spaniards,eight of Mustees^ 140 of Indians, and a conventof the religious order of St. Augustin. It is of amild temperature, and its principal commerceconsists in making painted cups of fine manufac-ture. Four leagues w. of its capital.

CUAMILA, a small settlement or ward of thealcaldia mayor Guachinango in NuevaEspana ;annexed to the curacy of the settlement ofTIaola.

CUANALA, Santa Maria de, a settlementof the bead settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco in NuevaEspana ; situate on the shore ofthe pleasant valley of (3culma. It is surroundedby many small settlements or wards, in which thereare reckoned 212 families of Indians, and 10 ofMuslees and Mulattoes ;* all of whom are em-ployed as drovers or agriculturalists. Two leaguesn. of its capital.

CUAPALA, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Atlistac, and aluddia mayor of Tlapa, inNuevaEspana. It contains 42 families of In-dians.

CUATALPAN Santiago de, a settlement ofthe alcaldia mayor Tezcoco in NuevaEspana.it contains 36 families of Indians, and 27 of Spa-niards and Mustics.

CUATLAN, a settlement of the head settlementof Ixtlahuacan, and alcaldia mayor of Colima ;.situate on the margin of a river which fertilizesthe gardens lying on either of its banks, the sameabounding in ail kinds of fruits and herbs. It is

of a mild temperature, and its commerce consistsin maize, French beans, and in the making ofmats. In its precincts are six estates or groves ofcoco trees ; and in those dwell .nine families ofSpaniards and Miistees. In the settlement are 70families. It is three leagues e. of its head settle-ment.

CUAUCHINOLA, a settlement of the headsettlement of Xoxutla, and alcaldia mayor ofCuernavaca, in NuevaEspana.

CUAUCOTLA, S. Diego de, a settlement ofthe head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cholulain NuevaEspana. It contains 27 families of In-dians, and is a quarter of a league from its capital.

CUAUTIPAC, a settlement of the head settle-ment and alcaldia mayor of Tlapa in NuevaEspana. It contains 23 families of Indians, and isone league to the s. e. of its capital.

CUAUTLA, San Juan de, a settlement ofthe head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Cholulain NuevaEspana. It contains 16 families of In-dians, and is one league to the w. of its capital.

CUAUTLA, with the dedicatory title of SanMiguel, another settlement of the alcaldia mayorof Cuernavaca in the same kingdom ; situate in afertile and beautiful open plain near the settlementof Mazate.pec. It contains 23 families of Indians,and 11 of Spaniards and Mulattoes, who employthemselves in fishing for small but well-flavouredbagres, which are found in great abundance in ariver which runs near the town.

CUAUTOLOTITLAN, a settlement of thehead settlement of Atlistac, and alcaldia mayor ofTlapa, in NuevaEspana. It contains 42 familiesof Indians.

CUB, a small river of the province and colonyof Virginia. It runs and enters the Staunton.

CUBA, a large island of the N. sea, and thelargest of the Antilles ; situate at the mouth or en-trance of the bay of Mexico. It is 235 leagues inlength from c. to a', from the cape of St. Antonioto the point of Maizi, and 45 at its widest part,and 14 at the uarrow'est. To the n. it has Floridaand the ijiicayes isles ; to the c. the island of St.Domingo, and to the s. the island of Jamaica, andthe s. continent; and to the w. the gulf or hay ofMexico. It is betw een and 23°15'n. Int. and

from 74° 2' 3'^ to 84°55'tw. long It was discoveredby Admiral Cliristopher Columbus in 1492, in hisfirst voyage, before he discovered St. Domingo ;and he mistook it for the continent, and landedupon it. In tJie year 1494, it was found to be auisland by Nicholas do Obando. lie measured itscircumierence, and careened his ve.s.sel in the portof the Havana, which from that time has been

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dom of Guatemala, in the province and alcaldiamayor of Chiapa.

CUCHUNA, a large settlement of Indians, andformerly the capital of a small province of thisname in Peru, to the w. of the mountains of (heAndes. It was founded by Maita Capac, fourthEmperor of the Incas, after that he had literallystarved the country into obedience. These In-dians were treacherous, and used to give theirenemies a very deadly poison ; the said emperorcaused many to be burnt alive for having practisedthis abominable custom, and their houses to bedestroyed, together with their cattle and posses-sions.

CUCIO, a settlement of the head settlement ofPerucho, and alcaldia mayor of Guimco, in NuevaEspana. It contains 140 families of Indians, andis a quarter of a league from its head settlement.

CUCUANA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Mariquita in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; situate on the shore of the river Mag-dalena.

CUCUCHO, San Bartolome de, a settle-ment of tlie head settlement of Arantzan, and aleal-dia mayor of Valladolid, in the province andbishopric of Mechoacan. It contains 27 familiesof Indians, who employ themselves in agriculture,cutting wood, and making earthen-ware and

CUCUCHUCHAU, San Pedro de, a settle-ment of the bead settlement of the city of Cucupao,and alcaldia mayor of Valladolid, in the provinceand bishopric of Mechoacan ; situate on the shoreof the lake. It contains 18 families of Indians,and is two leagues to the s. of its head settle-ment.

CUCUISAS, a small river of the province andgovernment of Guayana. It rises to the e. of thesettlement of Encaramada, and enters the Itari.

CUCUMAYA, a river of Spanish island, or St.Domingo, which rises near the s. coast, runs s.and enters the sea between the Seco and the Bo-mana, opposite the island Cataline.

CUCUNUBA, a settlement oiihe corregimientoof Ubate in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It isof a cold temperature, and produces the fruits ofthis climate. It consists of 100 families, includingthose of its vicinity, and of 80 Indians; is nineleagues to the n. of Santa Fe.

CUCUNUCO, a mountain to the e, of the pro-vince and government of Popayan, eternallycovered with snow. From it rises the river Pu-rase, as also the river La Plata. It takes its namefrom a nation of Indians, by whom it was inhabit-

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ed, and of whom a few only, who are reduced tothe,faith, remain.

CUCURPE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana; situateon the shore of the river of its name, between thesettlements of Dolores and Ticapa.

CUCURULU, a river of the kingdom of Peru,which runs through the country of the CanisiencsIndians to the e. of the Andes, it abounds in fishof a very fine quality, which serve as food to thebarbarians; runs e. and being much swelled bythe waters it collects from others, enters the riverSanta Rosa.

CUCUTA, San Joseph de, a settlement ofthe government and jurisdiction of Pamplona inthe Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hottemperature, though healthy, of great commerce,owing to the cacao with which it abounds, andwhich is brought by persons coming from variousparts, the greater portion of it being embarked onthe river Sulia for Maracaibo. It contains morethan 100 rich Indians, but is infested with snakes,lice, and other noxious insects and reptiles.

CUCUTA, an extensive valley of this province (Pamplona),between the cities of Pamplona and S. Christoval,discovered by Juan de San Martin in 1534 ; cele-brated for its fertility, and excellent breed ofmules, by which the kingdom is supplied. It iswatered by many streamlets which render it luxu-riant and fertile, and most particularly in cacaoof the finest quality. The herb on which the muleschiefly feed is wild marjoram.

CUDAJA, a lake of the province and countryof Las Amazonas, in the territory possessed by thePortuguese. It is formed by one of the arms w hichis thrown out by the river Maranon, and returnsto enter the same, in the country of ihe CabaurisIndians.

CUDIHUEL, a settlement of Indians of thedistrict of Guadalabqueu in the kingdom of Chile,on the shore of the riv'er Valdivia.

CUDUUINI, a small river of the provinceand government of Cumaná. It rises in the ser~of Irnataca, runs s. and enters the Curgunion the n. side.

CUEBAYA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Sonora in Nueva Espana ; situateat the source of the river Bezani, to the w. of thegarrison which takes this name.

CUECA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Chipan.

CUELLO, a settlement of the jurisdictionof Tocayma, and government of Mariqnita, in

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the Nuevo Reynb de Granada ; situate in a greatvalley called the Llano Grande, where is bred alarge proportion of neat-cattle. Upon its side isthe river of its name, which presently enters theSaldana, and is full of fish. It is of a hot tempe>rattire, abounds in maize, cacaoj tobacco, yucas^and plantains ; and amongst the sand of the river’sside is found a great quantity of gold. It contains700 housekeepers, and a little more than 80 In-dians. It is 40 leagues to the s. w. of Santa Fe.

CUENCA, a province and corregimiento ofthe kingdom of Quito; bounded n. by the provinceof Riobamba ; s. by that of Jaen de Bracamoros ;e. by that of Guayaquil ; w. by that of Quijosand Macas ; n. e. by that of Chimbo ; and s. e.by that of Loxa. Its temperature is mild,balm and healthy. Great herds of cattle are bredhere, and it consequently abounds in flesh-meats ;likewise in every species of birds, grains, pulse,garden herbs, sugar, and cotton ; the natives mak-ing of the latter very good woven articles, and inwhich they trade, as well as in wheat, chick-peas,bark, French beans, lentils, bams, and sweetmeats.Its mines are of gold, silver, copper, quicksilver,and sulphur; but none of them are worked; alsoin the llanos or plain of Talqui, are some minesof alabaster, extremely fine, though somewhatsoft. Tlie principal traffic of this province arefloor-carpets, cabinet articles, and tapestries, herecalled pawos de cor/e, (cloths of the court), beauti-fully worked, and which are so highly esteemedthat no house in the kingdom, that has any pre-tensions to elegance and convenience, is seen with-out them. It is watered by four large rivers, call-ed Yanuneay, Machangara, Banos, and Tume-bamba ; the latter being also called Matadero, andis the largest. It abounds in bark and cochineal,the latter being gathered in great quantities, andemployed in the dyeing of baizes, which areesteemed the best of any in America. Its tannedhides and prepared skins are equally in high esti-mation. It is, in short, more highly favouredthan any other province in natural riches j and itwould not have to envy any other, were it not thatits inhabitants, who have been called Morlacos,were of a haughty, domineering disposition, greatdisturbers of peace, and more inclined to riot anddiversion than to labour. The capUal is

Cuenca, Santa Ana de, a city founded by GilRamirez Davalos, in 1557, in the valley of Yunquilla, celebrated for its pleasantness and fertility ;this valley is six leagues and an half long, and asmany wide in the middle of the serrania; from thisserrama issue, to water the same valley, four large

rivers, the first called Machangara, which runs r,of the city, and very close to it; the second,which runs to the n, is called Matadero, being alsonearthetown ; the third Yanuneay, at half a quarterofa league’s distance, and the fourth Banos: of allthese united is formed a very large one, which af-terwards takes the name of Paute, and which hasin its environs mines of gold and silver. This cityis large, and one of the most beautiful of any inthe kingdom. The parish church, which was erectedinto a cathedral, and head of the bishopric of theprovince, in the year 1786, is magnificent. Ithas four parishes, (he five following convents, viz.of the religious order of St. Francis, St. Domingo,St. Augustin, St. Peter Nolasco, and a collegewhich belonged to the regulars of the company ofJesuits, two monasteries of nuns, one of La Concep-cion, and the other of Santa Teresa, and an hospi-tal, being one of the most sumptuous, convenient,and well attended possible; the whole of thesebeing very superior edifices. The streets run instraight lines; the temperature is kind, mild, andhealthy ; and the neighbourhood abounds in everykind of flesh, and in whatsoever productions canbe required, as pu)ge, vegetables, and fruits.Some very fine large cheeses are made here, whichresemble those of Parma, and are carried as dain-ties to Lima, Quito, and other parts. The sugarywhich is made in great quantities, is of the finestand most esteemed sort, as are also the conservesof various fruits, which are known by the name ofcaccetas de Cuenca. A few years ago, a hat manu-factory was established here, when a stamp wasmade bearing the resemblance of an EmperorInca, and with the motto, “ Lahore duce, comitefortuna.” This proved one of the best and mostuseful manufactories of any in the city. In theterritory to the s. is the height of Tarqui, cele-brated for being the spot where the base of themeridian was taken by the academicians of thesciences of Paris, M. Godin, Bouger, and La Con-damine, assisted by Jorge Juan and Don Anto-nio de Ulloa, who accompanied them, in 1742.yhis city is subject to tempests, which form on asudden when the sky is clear, and which are ac-companied with terrible thunder and lightning,the women apply themselves to labour, and it isby these that is carried on the great commercewhich exists in baizes which they fabricate, andare held in high esteem, together with other wo-ven articles. It is the native place of the FatherSebastian Sedeno, missionary apostolic of the ex-tinguished company of the Jesuits in the provinceof Mainas- The population of Cuenca is 14,000

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country of Las Amazonas. It flows in the territoryof the Carigueres or Mutuanis Indians, runs c.and enters the Madera opposite the great cataract.

CUIAPAN, a settlement of the head settlementof Atoyaque, and alcaldia mayor of Zayula, inNueva Espana. It contains 70 families of In-dians, who live by agriculture and making coarsestuffs. It is one league to the s. of its head settle-ment.

CUIATAN, a settlement of the head settlementof the district and alcaldia mayor of Caxitlan,being a league and a half’s distance to the s. w.

CUIAUTEPEC, Santiago de, a settlementof the head settlement of Olinala, and alcaldiamayor of Tlapa, in Nueva Espana. It contains32 families of Indians, and is two leagues to then. c. of its head settlement.

CUIAUTEPEC, another settlement of the headsettlement of Ayotitlan, and alcaldia mayor ofAmola, in the same kingdom. It contains 13 fa-milies of Indians, who live by agriculture andbreeding cattle; is 10 leagues to the w, of itshead settlement.

CUICATLAN, the alcaldia mayor of the pro-vince and bishopric of Mechoacan. It is 19leagues in length from e. to w. and 1 1 in widthn. s. It is of a hot temperature, abounds in salt-petre, scarlet-dye, and cotton, of which beautifulornamental dresses are made ; these being the prin-cipal source of its commerce. The capital is thesettlement of the same name, inhabited by 125 fa-milies of Cuicatecos Indians, who cultivate greatquantities of maize, French beans, and cotton. Itis 70 leagues to the e. with a slight inclination tothe s. of Mexico. The other settlements of thisdistrict are,

Alpizagua==, ==Teponastla,

Cotahuiztla==, Teutitlan]],

Nacantepec==, Santa Ana]],

Quiotepeque==, ==San Lucas,

Coyula==, ==San Antonio,

Izcatlan==, ==San Mateo,

Papalotipac==, ==San Martin,

Santiago==, ==Casa Blanca,

San Lorenzo==, ==Nanahuatipac,

San Geronimo==, ==San Juan de los Cues,

Santa Cruz==, ==Thecomahuaca,

Santa Maria==, ==Teopuxco,

San Lorenzo==, ==Santiago,

Los Santos Reyes==, ==Huehuetlan,

Tepeuzila==, ==San Pedro,

San Pedro==, ==San Juan,

San Andres==, ==Huahutla,

Santa Maria==,==Chilchola.

==CUICEO=, (Of the lake), the alcaldia mayor of

the province and bishopric of Mechoacan ; boundedc. by the province of Acambaro ; n. by that ofZelaya; nc. by that of Pasquaro ; and s. by thatof Valladolid. It is in length eight leagues frome. to w. and five in width «. s. It is surroundedby a lake of wholesome water, which gives itsname to the jurisdiction, and which, towards then. part, becomes dry in the summer season, itswaters being supplied from certain drains fromanother large lake which lies on its s. side. Thetemperature here is, for the most part, mild anddry, and the place abounds with salutary waters,which bubble out from a fountain in an island ofthe above mentioned lake. Its commerce is verysmall, since it produces only maize, French beans,and Chile pepper, and a kind of fish found in greatabundance in both the lakes, called charaes.

The capital is the settlement of the samename ; situate in front of the island formed bythe lake.. It contains a convent of the religiousorder of St. Augustin, and 190 families of Indians,including those of the wards of its district, 72 ofSpaniards, 11 of Mulattoes, and 43 of Mustees.It is 50 leagues to the w, of Mexico. The othersettlements are,

San Marcos==, ==San Buena Ventura,

San Geronimo==, ==Cupandaro,

Sta. Ana Maya==, ==San Juan. (Mechoacan)

CUICOCHA, a large lake of the province andcorregimiento of Octavalo in the kingdom ofQuito, surrounded by living stone. To the e. ithas a rock, where it forms a streamlet, which after-wards enters the river Blanco. It does not appearto receive its waters from any source, and i«thought to be filled through subterraneous aque-ducts from the mountain of Cota-cacbe, which iscovered with eternal snow. In the middle of thislake rise two hills, which have the appearance oftwo beautiful isles, the one being covered withtrees, and filled with stags and mountain goats, andthe other being bedecked with a herb calledp^jow,amongst which thrive many Indian rabbits, which,in the language of the country, are called cuy^ andfrom thence the name of Cuy-cocha, which meansthe lake of Indian rabbits. The water which runsbetween the two islands, forms a channel of 3000fathoms. This lake belongs to the noble familyof the Chiribogas of Quito.

CUILAPA, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Ygualapa in Nueva Espana,half a quarter of a league’s distance from its ca-pital.

CUILAPA, a town, the head settlement of thedistrict of the alcaldia mayor of Quatro Villas inNueva Espana ; situate at the skirt of a mountain.

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tlie small river Guatanay ; the same being nearlydry, save in the months of January, February,and March ; though the little water found in itjust serves to irrigate the neighbouring plains.The grandeur and magnificence of the edifices,of the fortress, and of the temple of the sun, struckthe Spaniards with astonishment, when, at the con-quest, they first beiield them, and upon their en-tering the city.j in 1534, when the same was takenpossession of by Don Francisco Pizarrro, forCharles V^. It was then the capital of the wholeempire of Peru, and the residence of the empe-rors. Its streets were large, wide, and straight ;though at the present day Lima stands in compe-tition with it in regard to grandeur. The housesare almost all builtofstone, and of fine proportions.The cathedral, which has the title of La Asun-cion, is large, beautiful, rich, and of very goodarchitecture, and some even prefer it to the cathe-dral of Lima. Here are three curacies in thechapel of the Sagrario, two for the Spaniards, andanother for the Indians and Negroes ; and the pa-rishes are Nuestra Senora de Belen, San Christo-yal, Santa Ana, San Bias, S:intiago, and the hos-pital ; besides two others, which are without thecity, called San Geronirno and San Sebastian.Here are nine convents of the following religiousorders ; one of St. Dominic, founded on the spotwhere the Indians had their celebrat^sd temple ofthe sun ; two of St. Francis, one of the Observers,and another of the Recoletans, one of St. Au-gustiti, one of La Merced, two colleges whichbelonged to the regulars of the extinguished com-pany of Jesuits, the principal, in the part lyingtowards the c. being destined, at the present time,for an armoury ; and the other at the back of thesame, in which was the house for noviciates andstudents, serving now as barracks for the troops ;add to these the chapel of ease to the cathedral.Here are four hospitals ; the first and most ancientis that of the Espiritu Santo, in which are receivedIndians of both sexes, subject to the patronageof the secular cabildo, and governed by a junta ofS3 persons, the president of whom, the alcalde,has the first vote, and after him the administratoror first brother. It has two chaplains and veryample revenues ; one of the sources being the du-ties paid upon all effects passing over the bridgeof Yipuriraac, the which droits belonged to theroyal exchequer until the year 1763, at whichtime, at the instance of the king’s ensign, DonGabriel de Ugarte, they were conceded by theking to the hospital, together with the right andproperty of the bridge, in redemption of somecrown grants which were left to the hospital by

Rodrigo de Leon, in Seville ; and it was by thismeans that the hospital, having become so wellendowed, has now no less than 250 beds. A jubi-lee has been granted by the apostolical see to itschapel; and this is celebrated at the octave ofPentecost with much solemnity, and by an unusu-ally great concourse of people, and was once the bestobserved jubilee of any in America. The se-cond hospital, being of the religious order of SanJuan de Dios, is for the men, and has 50 beds;the third, called. Of Nuestra Senora de la Almu-dena, is for all descriptions of individuals, andhas also 50 beds ; the tburih, called San rlndres,has 30 beds for Spanish women. Here are threemonasteries of nuns ; the first of Santa Catalina dcSena, founded where the Incas kept the virginsdedicated to the sun ; and the others are of SantaClara and the bare-tboted Carmelites. Here arealso four other religious houses, which are that^ofthe Nazarenes, thatof Nuestra Senora del Carmen,that of Santiago, and that of San Bias ; three col-leges, which are, that of San Bernardo, whereinare taught grammar, philosophy, and theology,and was founded by a Aizcayan for the sons of theconquerors, having been formerly under thecharge of the regulars of the company of Jesuits,and at present under an ecclesiastical rector ; thatof San Borja, for the sons of the Indian caciques,where they are initiated in their letters, and in therudiments of music, at least as many of them asshow any disposition to this science, (this accom-plishment having been formerly taught by thesame regulars of the company) ; and that of SanAntonio Abad, which is a seminary and univer-sity, and is a very sumptuous piece of architec-ture. This city preserves many monuments of itsancient grandeur ; and amongst the rest, thegreat fortress built for its defence, which, althoughinjured by time, bears testimony to the powers ofthe Incas, and excites astonishment in the mindof every beholder, since the stones, so vast andshapeless, and of so irregular a superficies, areknit together, and laid one to fit into the other withsuch nicety as to want no mortar or other materialwhereby to fill up the interstices ; and it is indeeddifficult to imagine how they could work them inthis manner, when it is considered that they knewnot the use of iron, steel, or machinery for thepurpose. The other notable things are the baths ;the one of warm and the other of cold water ; theruins of a large stone-way, which was built by or-der of the Incas, and which reached as far aswhere Lima now stands ; the vestiges of some sub-terraneous passages which led to the fortress fromthe houses or palaces of the Inca, and in which pass-4 n ?

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