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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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are the ruins or some well made benches in the shape of couches, which have been much injured by time, and were there before the corning of the Spaniards. Lat. 13° 16' 30" s. Long. 74° 32' 30" w.

another settlement, of the same name in the province and corregimiento of Jauja, annexed to the curaey of Cochangara.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tarma.

ACOBIMBILLA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Angaraes in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Conaica.

ACOCHALA, a very lofty mountain of the province and corregimienento of Lipes, in the arch- bishopric of Charcas, where there are some very fine silver mines, which are, however, little worked for want of hands.

ACOLA , a settlement of the province and cor- regimiento of Lucanas in Peru, annexed to the curacy of its capital.

ACOLMAN, San Agustin de , a settlement of the head settlement and alcaldia mayor of Tez- coco, in Nueva Espana, situate in a pleasant valley of a benign temperature. There are some wards united to its district, and the number of its inhabitants, including these wards, amounts to 240 Indian families, besides a convent of monks of the order of St. Augustin.

ACOMA , a settlement of Nuevo Mexico, situ- ate on the shore of a river which enters the Grande of the N. between the settlements of San J uan and La Laguna. [It is on a high mountain, with a strong castle, and is the capital of the province. [Lat, 35° 24' «. Long. 106° 10'

ACOMACK , a county of the province and colony of Virginia, which preserves its Indian name. It is the largest county of the province, containing 200,925 acres of ground ; but not so well peopled as the others, and has only one parish, which is of the same name. Different rivers take their rise here ; among the most noted is the Clif>- sonossea,

ACOMAIO, a settlement of the province, and corregimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Santa Maria del Valle, situate on the confines of the infidel Panataguas Indians.

another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru.

ACOMARCA, a settlement of the province and corregimityito of Vilcas Huaman in Peru, arinexed to the curacy of Vilcas.

ACOMES, a fall of the river Amariscoggin, in the prov'ince of Continent, one of the four w hich compose the colony of New England.

ACOMULCO, a settlement of the head settle- ment and alcaldia mayor of Zochicoatlan in Nueva Espana. It contains 12 Indian families, and is two leasrues to the w. of its capital.

ACONCAGUA, a province and corregimiento of the kingdom of Chile ; bounded n. by a part of the province of Quillota, e, by the Cordillera, s. by the valley of Colina, of the jurisdiction of Santiago, w. by the province of Quillota. Its territory is level and well watered. It is divided into two parts by a large river of the same name, having a bridge built of stone and mortar, w ith two arches. It produces abundance of wheat and much wild marjoram, which is carried to Peru, and forms the principal branch of its commerce. In this province is the royal road, lying through the Cordillera in the way to Mendoza, which is very rough and dangerous, on account of the many slopes and steep declivities towards the river ; the path is very narrow, and in various places it is necessary to open a pass by means of a pick-axe ; so that, if at any time the mules should crowd together, they would push each other into the river, w hich has not unfrequently been the case. The royal treasures are carried by this road from the month of Novem- ber to April and part of May. A few years since, some small houses of brick and mortar have been built on one or other side of the Cordillera, which they call casuchas (miserable huts) ; in these they put, in the winter time, some coal, biscuit, and hung beef, so that the couriers, providing them- selves with the keys of the doors at Mendoza, or, on the other side, at the Guardia of Aconcagua, may have something to live upon, incase they should be stopt by a fall of snow on their journey ; and with this precaution, a courier goes every month to Santiago, carrying with him the mails brought by the ships from Europe. In the winter it is customary to walk on foot over the snow, from Paramillo, which is three leagues from the top of the Cordillera, and four from its descent to tlie place which is called Los Ojos de Agua, through the valley of Putaendo ; but towards the ??. there is another way, which they call De Los Patos, which is the road generally taken in going to the city of San Juan ; but the Cordillera being more lofty here, it is only passable in the months of February and March. The inhabitants of this province amount, on an average, to 8000 souls. The capital' is San Felipe el Real. [Lat. 32° II' s. Long. 70° 12' 30" w. j

ACONCAGUA, a large river which runs through the above province, rising in the mountains of the Cordillera, and running through it by the side of the road which leads to Buenos Ayres : hrarcliing

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America, having an excellent port, three leaguesin length, and in which there are many othersmall islands. On the adjoining mainland thereis a river called De Salmones, (salmon), on ac-count of its abounding with these fish, of whichindeed great quantities are taken, as they are es-teemed the finest species of fish of any in that partof the world .

Canseau, a small settlement of the sameisland, which was burnt by the French in the warof 1744.

Canseau, a cape of the same island, at the en-trance of the straits, and also a sand-bank at themouth of them.

CANTA, a province and government of Peru,bounded on the n. e. and e. by Tarma, on the w.by Chancay, partly by the corregimiento of Cer-cado, and on the s. by Huarochiri. It is 24leagues in length n. to s. and 35 in width e. to w.Its territory is generally uneven, being in the cor-dillera. It has some deep pits or canals, on thesides of which, and in small spots, they sow andcultivate vegetables, fruits, and potatoes. Thebreed of cattle is by no means inconsiderable here,and there are to be found most of the wild animalswhich are natives of the sierra, namely, vicuñas,(wild goats), and sheep peculiar to these countries,and differing from those of Europe. In this pro-vince as well as in nearly all those of the sierra,there is scarcely any wood for the purposes ofcooking, and this want is supplied by the use ofturf, which makes a lively fire, but which is veryapt to smoke. Those parts which are called que-bradas, or rugged and uneven, are very sickly,and are subject to two species of maladies com-mon to other cold climates in this country ; theone is that of warts, which not budding in duetime, often become exceedingly troublesome, andeven dangerous ; the other of corrosive sores,shewing themselves particularly upon the face,and are difficult to be cured, and which are attri-buted to the sting of an insect called uta. Somemines of silver were formerly worked here, whichwere so abundant, that they used to render 200marks each cajon, (an excavation of 20 feet square,more or less), but these, from not being regularlyworked, are filled with water. Here are also twohills of loadstone, as also some minerals of alum,copper, and red lead. The following rivers taketheir rise in this province : The Carabaya from thelakes Tacaimbaba and Lorococha, which emptythemselves into the sea on the n. of Lima ; andthe Pasamayo, which runs to the s. of Chancay,first receiving the waters of some hot medicitialsprings. Its corregidor used to receive a repar-

timiento of 125,000 dollars, and it paid yearly1000 for alcavala.

The capital is a town of the same name, in lat.11° 10' s. and its jurisdiction comprehends 62others, which are,

Carhua, Arahuay,

Obrajillo, Anaica,

Parsamaria, Quiby,

Chaqui, Pirca,

Pamacocha, Cotoc,

Carhuacayan, Chaupic,

Yanta, Pampas,

Pari, Marco,

Uchayucarpa, Rauma,

Huaillas, Huacos,

Huasichao, Biscas,

Pacaraos, Yazú,

Uschaicocha, Yanga,

Santa Cruz, Baños,

Santa Catarina, Carae,

Chauca, San Agustin,

Rivira, Huamantanga,

Chupas, Sumbirca,

Culli, San Buenaventura,

Vircay, Huaros,

Atabillos Altos, San Lorenzo,

Pasa, Mayo,

Chisque, Alpamarca,

Huanoquin, Atabillos Baxos,

Cormo, Huaicoi,

Lampian, Puruchucu,

Pallas, Ama,

San Juan, San Joseph,

Quipan, Culluay,

Guandaro, Pampacocha,

San Miguel, Quizú.

CANTANABALO, a river of the province andgovernment of San Juan de los Llanos in thenew kingdom of Granada. It rises between theCaviusari and the Sinaruco, and running nearlyparallel with them, enters into the Orinoco.

CANTERBURY, a fort of the province ofHampshire, one of the four composing the colonyof New England. It is built on the shore of theriver Pennycook, and at the mouth of the water-course formed by the lake Winnipisiokee.

(Canterbury, a township in Windhamcounty, Connecticut, on the w. side of Quinna-baug river, which separates it from Plainfield.It is seven miles e. by s. of Windham, and about10 or 12 n. of Norwich.)

CANTLA, a small settlement of the head set-tlement and alcaldía mayor of Cuquio in NuevaEspaña, situate on the n. of its capital.

(CANTON, a new township in Norfolk county,

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Were Held by the Jesuits, in the province and go-vernment of Paraguay ; situate almost to the s, ofVilla Rica.

CASA-PIEDRA, Isla De, an island of thecoast and kingdom of Brazil, and province andcaptainship of the Rio Janeiro, close to Cape Frio.

CASA-PIEDRA, a settlement of this province andkingdom ; situate near the coast and upon the shoreof a river thus called.

Casa-Piedra, a river which runs s. s. e. in thisprovince, and joins the sea very near Cape Frio.

==CASAPOEIRA, Bahia de, or De BarrerasBermejas==, a bay on the coast and in the captain-ship of Marañon, arid kingdom of Brazil, betweenthe islands Ygirapa and Sipatuba.

CASARA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Andahuailas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Chincheros.

Casara, another settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Vilcas Huaman, also of Peru ;annexed to the curacy of Hualla.

CASARANI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Condesuyos de Arequipa inPeru.

CASARIDA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Maracaibo ; situate on the coast, atthe mouth of the river of its name.

Casarida. This river rises near the coast, runsn. and enters the sea.

CASAS-GRANDES, an extensive and beautifulvalley of the province of Los Apaches in NuevaEspaña.

CASAUATAI, a river of the province andcountry of the Amazonas : it rises from the lake ofthe Gran Cocama, in 6 ° 48' s. hit. runs to the s. ofthe Maraiion, and following its course towards then. for more than 25 leagues, runs e. to enter theUcayale on its e. side, and afterwards to receivethe waters of the Zapofe.

CASCABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Andahuailas in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Talavera.

CASCABELES, a river of the province andcorregimiento of Pastos in the kingdom of Quito :it rises near the ruins of the city of Simancas, andenters the river Caqueta, where are also the ruinsof the city of Mocoa.

CASCADE, a small river of country and landof Labrador : it runs s. between the rivers Bois andSan Francisco, and enters the sea in the strait ofBellisle.

CASCAJAL, a river of the province and king-dom of Tierra Firme : it rises in the mountains ofPortovelo, and runs into the sea through the bay ofthis city.

Cascajal, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Cartagena ; situate on the shore of theriver Cauca, in the district and jurisdiction of thetown of Mompox.

CASCAJO, ISLA DEL, an island of the coast ofthe province and government of Cartagena, close tothe island of Arenas.

Cascajo, a point of the s. coast of the island ofSanto Domingo, in the French possessions : it liesbetween port Nonet and port Salud.

CASCARA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Parinacochas in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Lampa.

CASCAS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Conturnaza ; in the district of whichthere is, at three leagues distance, a large piece ofhewn stone of 13 yards long and three quarters of ayard wide on every face, particularly rough andunpolished.

Cascas, a large swamp of the province and go-vernment of San Juan de los Llanos, which isformed from different arms of the rivers Sarare andApure, and communicates itself with the lake ofArechona ; both of these lakes being near the lastriver, and at the skirt of ihe paramo or mountain de-sert of Chisgas.

CASCAY, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Paucartambo in Peru.

CASCAYUNCA, an ancient province of Peru, tothe n. e. of Cuzco, conquered by Tupac Yupanqui,twelfth Emperor.

(CASCO Bay, in the district of Maine, spreadsn. w. between cape Elizabeth on the s. w. and capeSmall Point on the n. e. Within these points,which are about 40 miles apart, are about 300 smallislands, some of which are inhabited, and nearlyall more or less cultivated. The land on theseislands, and on the opposite coast on the main, isthe best for agriculture of any on the sea-coast ofthis country. Casco includes several bays. Maquoitbay lays about 20 miles n. of cape Elizabeth. Thewaters of Casco extend several arms or creeks ofsalt water into the country. The waters go upMeadow’s river, where vessels of a considerablesize are carried by the tide, and where it flowswithin one mile of the waters of Kennebeck. Onthe e. side of cape Elizabeth is the arm of the seacalled Stroudwater. Farther e. is Presumpscotriver, formerly called Presumpea, or Presumpkeag,which rises in Sebago Pond. This river opens tothe waters of Casco bay on the e. of Portland ; itsextent is not great, but it has several valuable millsupon it. Rayal’s river, called by the nativesW estecustego, falls into the bay six miles from

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20. Don Ignacio de Flores, native of Quito,who had served as captain of cavalry in the regi-ment of the volunteers of Aragon, and who was go-vernor of the province of Moxos, being of the rankof colonel ; he was nominated as president by wayof reward for his services, in having been instru-mental to the pacification of the Indians of Peru,and to the succouring of the city of La Paz, whichwas besieged by rebels : he governed until 1786,when he was removed from the presidency.

Charcas, a ferocious and barbarous nation ofIndians of Peru, to the s.w. of the lakes of Aul-laga and of Paria ; conquered by Mayta Capac,fourth monarch of the Incas. At present theyare reduced to the Christian faith in the govern-ment of Chuquisaca or La Plata.

Santa Maria Charcas, a settlement, with the dedicatory titleof Santa Maria, being the real of the mines of thekingdom of Nueva Galicia, in which are markedthe boundaries of its jurisdiction, and those ofNueva Espana, the last district of the bishopric ofMechoacan. It contains a convent of the religi-ous order of St. Francis, and 50 families of Spa-niards, ilfwstees, and Mulattoes, as also many of In-dians dispersed in the rancherias and the estatesof its district: is 130 leagues to the n. J to then. w. of Mexico, 75 from Guadalaxera, and 18 tothe n. e. of the sierra of Pinos. Lat. 22° 55'.Long. 100° 40'.

Charcas, another settlement and real of themines of the province of Copala, and kingdom ofNueva Vizcaya ; situate two leagues from thecapital. In its vicinity are the estates of Panuco,in which they work with quicksilver the metals ofthe mines. To its curacy, which is adminsteredby one of the Catholic clergy, are annexed twosmall settlements of Serranos Indians, amongst whomare found some few of the Tepeguana nation.

CHARIMIZA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Mainas in the kingdom of Quito.It rises in the cordillera towards the s. and entersthe Maranon.

(CHARLEMONT, a township in Hampshirecounty, Massachusets, 16 miles w. of Deerfield,having 665 inhabitants.)

(Charles, a cape on the s.w. part of the straitentering into Hudson’s bay. Lat. 62° 40' n.Long. 75° 15' w.)

Charles, a small lake of New France, to then. of the city of Quebec, which empties itself intothe river St. Lawrence.

Charles, another cape or point of the coast ofthe country of Labrador ; one of those which formthe w. entrance or mouth of the strait of Belle-isle.

(Charles River, in Massachusetts, called an-ciently Quinobequin, is a considerable stream,the principal branch of which rises from a pondbordering on Hopkinton. It passes through Hollis-ton and Bellingham, and divides Medway fromMed field, Wrentham, and Franklin, and thenceinto Dedham, where, by a curious bend, it forms apeninsula of 900 acres of land. A stream calledlother brook runs out of this river in this town,and falls into Neponsit river, forming a naturalcanal, uniting the two rivers, and affording a num-ber of excellent mill-seats. From Dedham thecourse of the river is n. dividing Newton fromNeedham, Weston, and Waltham, passing overromantic falls ; it then bends to the n. e. and e.through Watertown and Cambridge, and passinginto Boston harbour, mingles with the waters ofMystic river, at the point of the peninsula ofCharlestown. It is navigable for boats to Water-town, seven miles. The most remarkable bridgeson this river are those which connect Boston withCharlestown and Cambridge. SeeBosxoN. Thereareseven paper mills on this river, besides other mills.][Charles County, on the w. shore of Maryland,lies between Potowmack and Patuxent rivers. Itschief town is port Tobacco, on the river of thatname. Its extreme length is 28 miles, its breadth24, and it contains 20,613 inhabitants, including10,085 slaves. The country has few hills, is gene-rally low and sandy, and produces tobacco, Indiancorn, sweet potatoes, &c.)

(Charles City County, in Virginia, lies betweenChickahominy and James rivers. It containedformerly part of what now forms Prince George’scounty. It has 5588 inhabitants, including 3141slaves.)

(Charles, a cape of Virginia, in about lat. 37°15' n. It is on the n. side of the mouth of Chesa-peak bay, having cape Henry opposite to it.]

Charles, a promontory in N. America, men-tioned by the English captain Thomas James, inhis voyage published 1663, which was made forthe sake of discovering a pass to S. America.

CHARLES. See Carlos, San.

CHARLESTON, a capital city of S. Carolina,is one of the best of N. America, excelling inbeauty, grandeur, and commerce. It is situateupon a long strip of land between two navigablerivers, which are Ashley and Cowper, and thegreater part of it upon the latter. This forms inthe city two small bays, the one to the n. and theother to the s. The town is of a regular construc-tion, and well fortified both by nature and art,having six bastions and a line of entrenchment ; onthe side of the river Cowper it has the bastions of

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(the city clean and healthy ; but are too narrow forso large a place and so warm a climate. Theirgeneral breadth is from 35 to 66 feet. The houseswhich have been lately built are brick with tiledroofs. The buildings in general are elegant, andmost of them are neat, airy, and well furnished.The public buildings are, an exchange, a state-bouse, an armoury, a poor-house, and an orphan’shouse. Here are several respectable academies.Part of the old barracks has been handsomely fittedlip, and converted into a college, and there area number of students ; but it can only be called asyet a respectable academy. Here are two banks ;a branch of the national bank, and the S. Carolinabank, established in 1792. The houses for publicworship are, two Episcopal churches, two for In-dependents, one for Scotch Presbyterians, one forBaptists, one for German Lutherans, two for Me-thodists, one for French Protestants, a meeting-house for Quakers, a Roman Catholic chapel, anda Jewish synagogue. Little attention is paid tothe public markets ; a great proportion of the mostwealthy inhabitants having plantations, from whichthey receive supplies of almost every article ofliving. The country abounds with poultry andwild ducks. Their beef, mutton, and veal are notgenerally of the best kind ; and few fish are foundin the market. In 1787 it was computed that therewere 1600 houses in this city, and 15,000 inhabi-tants, including 5400 slaves ; and what evincesthe healthiness of the place, upwards of 200 of thewhite inhabitants were above 60 years of age. In1791 there were 16,359 inhabitants, of whom 7684were slaves. This city has often suffered muchby fire ; the last and most destructive happened aslate as June 1796. Charleston was incorporatedin 1783, and divided into three wards, which chooseas many wardens, from among whom the citizenselect an intendant of the city. The intendant andwardens form the city-council, who have power tomake and enforce bye-laws for the regulation ofthe city. The value of exports from this port, inthe year ending November 1787, amounted to505,279/. 19^. 5d. sterling. The number of vesselscleared from the custom-house the same year was947, measuring 62,118 tons; 735 of these, mea-suring 41,531 tons, were American ; theothers be-longed to Great Britain, Ireland, Spain, France, andthe United Netherlands. In the year 1794 the valueof exports amounted to 3,846,392 dollars. It is 60miles s. w. by s. of Georgetown, 150 e. by s. ofAugusta, 497 s. by w. of Richmond, 630 s. w. bys. of Washington city ; 763 s. w. by s. of Philadel-phia, and 1110 s. w. of Boston. Lat. 32° 48'.Long. 80° 2' w. Knoxville, the capital of the state

of Tennessee, is much nearer to this than to anysea-port town in the Atlantic ocean. A waggonroad of only 15 miles is wanted to open the com-munication ; and the plan is about to be executedby the state.)

Charleston, another capital city of the countyof Middlesex in New England; situate on thebank of the river Charles. It is well peopled andof a good construction, occupying the whole of thespace which lies between the aforesaid river andthat of Mystic, the former river dividing the cityfrom Boston, in the same manner as the Thamesdivides London from Southwark. It has a raft forthe traffic of the river instead of a bridge, the fareor produce of which belongs to the college of Nor-wood in the city of Cambridge, which is close by :this city is as it were the half of Boston, and itssituation, as being upon a peninsula, is very ad-vantageous. At certain times it has fairs, and isthe meeting place for the assembly of the county.It has a very large and handsome church, and amarketplace, ornamentally and conveniently situateon the river side, at which there are sold all kindsof flesh, fish, and other necessaries ; it has twolarge streets leading to it. The river is navigable,and runs through the country for many leagues. Isin Lat. 42° 24' n. Long. 71° 6' ay.

(CHARLESTOWN, the principal town inMiddlesex county, Massachusetts, called Misha-wun by the aboriginal inhabitants, lies n. of Boston,with which it is now connected by Charles riverbridge. The town, properly so called, is built ona peninsula formed by Mystic river on the e. anda bay setting up from Charles river on the w. Itis very advantageously situated for health, naviga-tion, trade, and manufactures of almost all the va-rious kinds. A dam across the mouth of the bay,which sets up from Charles river, would afford agreat number of mill-seats for manufactures. Bun-ker’s, Breed’s, and Cobble (now Barrell’s) hills,are celebrated in the history of the American revo-lution. The second hill has upon its summit amonument erected to the memory of Major-generalW arren, near the spot where he fell, among thefirst sacrifices to American liberty. The brow ofthe hill begins to be ornamented with eleganthouses. All these hills afford elegant and delight-ful prospects of Boston, and its charmingly varie-gated harbour, of Cambridge and its colleges, andof an extensive tract of highly cultivated country.It contains within the neck or parish about 250houses, and about 2000 inhabitants. The onlypublic buildings of consequence are, a handsomeCongregational church, with an elegant steepleand clock, and an alms-house, very commodious

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and pleasantly situated. Before the deslrnction oftil is town by the British in 1775, several brandiesof mannfadures were carried on to great advan-tage, some of which have been since revived : par-ticularly tlic manufacture of pot and pearl ashes,ship-building, rum, leather in all its branches,silver, tin, brass, and pewter. Three rope-walkshave lately been erected in this town, and tlie in-crease of its houses, population, trade, and naviga-tion, have been very great within a few' years past.This town is a port of entry in conjunction withBoston. At the head of the neck there is a bridgeover Mystic river, which connects Charlestown withMalden.)

CHARLESTOWN, another city of the island ofNevis, one of the Caribes, in the Antilles ; in w Inchthere are beautiful houses and shops well providedwith every thing ; is defended by a fort calledCharles. It has a market every Saturday, begin-ning at sun-rise and finishing at mid-day, whitherthe Negroes bring 'maize, names, garden-herbs,fruits, &c. In the parish of San Juan is a pieceof sulphureous land, in the upper extremity of anopening of the land, called Solfatara, or Sulphurgut, which is so hot as to be telt through the solesof the shoes when being trodden upon. At thefoot of the declivity of this same part of the city,is a small hot stream, called the Bath, which beingsupposed to rise from the aforesaid spot, loses itselfshortly in the sand. Towards the side lying nextthe sea are two fountains, one of hot water, theother of cold, and of these two are formed the lakeof Blackrock, the waters of which are of a moderatewarmth, and which lies to the n. of the city, beingnearly a quarter of a mile’s distance from the placewhere are caught eels and silver-fish, resemblingthe cod and slimgut in flavour, the latter of whichlias a head disproportioned to its body. [A prodi-gious piece ol Nevis mountain falling down in anearthquake several years ago, left a large vacuity,which is still to be seen. The altitude of thismountain, taken by a quadrant from Charlestownbay, is said to be a mile and a half perpendicular ;and from the said bay to the top, four miles. Thedeclivity from this mountain to the town is verysteep half-way, but afterwards easy of ascent.] InLat. 17° 8' u. and long. 62° 40' w.

Charlestown, another city of the island ofBarbadoes ; the situation of which is two leaguesfrom that of San Miguel. It has a good port de-fended by two castles ; the one beyoml the other,and both commanding the city and the road: inthe middle of them is a platform. Tlse inhabitantscarry on a great trade with the other islands.

(CHARLESTOWN, a township in Montgomery

county. New York, on the s. side of Mohawk river,about 32 miles w. of Schenectady. By the statecensus of 1796, 456 of the inhabitants are elec-tors.)

(Charlestown, a township in Mason county,Kentucky ; situate on the Ohio, at the mouth ofLauren’s creek. It contains but few houses, andis six miles n. of Washington, and 60 n. e. of Lex-ington. Lat. 38° 28' n.)

(Charlestown, a township in Chester county,Pennsylvania.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, on the e. side of Connecticutriver, 30 miles s. of Dartmouth college, upwards of70 n. of Northampton, 116 n. of w. of Boston, 120w. by 71. of Portsmouth, and 431 n. n. e. of Phila-delphia. It was incorporated in 1753, and con-tains 90 or 100 houses, a Congregational church,a court-house, and an academy. The road fromBoston to Quebec passes through this town. Lat.43° 16' n. Long. 72° 23' w. A small internaltrade is carried on here.)

(Charlestown, a post town in Cecil county,Maryland, near the head of Chesapeak bay ; sixmites e. n. e. from the mouth of Susquehannahriver, 10 zo. s. w. from Elktown, and 50 s. w. by zb.from Philadelphia. Here are about 20 houses,chiefly inhabited by fishermen employed in theherring fishery. Lat. 39° 36' w.)

(Charlestown, a district in the lower countryof S. Carolina, subdivided into 14 parishes. Thislarge district, of which the city of Charleston is thechief town, lies between Santee and Combaheerivers. It pays 21,473/. 14s. 6d. sterling, taxes. Itsends to the state legislature 48 representatives and13 senators, and one member to congress. It con-tains 66,986 inhabitants, of whom only 16,352 arefree.)

(Charlestown, a village in Berkley county,Virginia ; situate on the great road leading fromPhiladelphia to Winchester ; eight miles fromShepherdstown, and 20 from Winchester.)

(Charlestown, a township in Washingtoncounty, Rhode Island state, having the Atlanticocean on the s. and separated from Richmond on the71. by Charles river, a water of Fawcatiick. Some ofits ponds empty into Fawcatiick river, otliers intothe sea. It is 19 miles /L ti:;. of Newport, andcontains 2022 inhabitants, including 12 slaves. Afew years ago there w'ere about 500 Indians in thestate ; the greater part of them resided in tin's town-ship. They are peaceable and well disposed togovernment, and s|5cak the English language.)

CHARLETON, an island situate near the e.coast of the country of Labrador, in the part of N.

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(CHEGOMEGAN, a point of land about 60miles in length, on the s. side of lake Superior.About 100 miles w. of this cape, a considerableriver falls into the lake ; upon its banks abundanceof virgin copper is found.)

CHEGONOIS, a small river of the same pro-vince and colony as the former. It runs s. w, andenters the Basin des Mines.

CHEGUEHUE, a river of the province ofSucumbios in the kingdom of Quito. It runs s. w.and enters the Aguarico, in lat. 6' n.

CHEGUIQUILLA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Coquimbo in the king-dom of Chile ; situate to the s. of the town ofCopiapo.

CHEJANI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Carabaya in Peru ; annexed totlie curacy of Para.

CHEKOUTIMI, a settlement of Indians ofCanada, in the country of the nation of its name,on the shore of the river Saguenay.

CHELEL, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Luya and Chillaos in Peru ; an-nexed to the curacy of Cheto.

(CHELMSFORD, a township in Middlesexcounty, Massachusetts ; situated on the s. side ofMerrimack river, 26 miles n. w. from Boston, andcontains 1144 inhabitants. There is an ingeniouslyconstructed bridge over the river at Pawtucketfalls, which connects this town with Dracut. Theroute of the Middlesex canal, designed to connectthe waters of Merrimack with those of Bostonharbour, will be s. through the e. part of Chelms-ford.)

CHELQUE, a settlement of Indians of thedistrict of Guadalabquen in the kingdom of Chile;situate on the shore of the river Valdivia.

(CHELSEA, called by the ancient natives Win-nisimet, a town in Suffolk county, Massachusetts,containing 472 inhabitants. Before its incorpora-tion, in 1738, it was award of the town of Boston,It is situated n. e. of the metropolis, and separatedfrom it by the ferry across the harbour, calledWinnisimet.)

(Chelsea, a township in Orange county, Ver-mont, having 239 inhabitants.)

(Chelsea, the name of a parish in the city ofNorwich, (Connecticut), called the Landing, situ-ated at the head of the river Thames, 14 miles n.of New London, on a point of land formed bythe junction ofShetucket and Norwich, or Littlerivers, w hose united waters constitute the Thames.It is a busy, commercial, thriving, romantic, andagreeable place, of about 150 houses, ascending

one above another in tiers, on artificial founda-tions, on the 5. point of a high rocky hill,)

Chelsea, a settlement of the English in theprovince and colony of Massachusetts, one of thefour of New England, on the shore of the port ofBoston.

CHEMIN, Croix de la Molle De, a crossin Canada, standing in the middle of the road nearthe river W abache.

(CHEMUNG, The w. branch of Susquehannahriver is sometimes so called. See Tioga River.)

(CHEMUNG is a township in Tioga county,New York. By the state census of 1796, 81 ofits inhabitants were electors. It has Newton w.and Oswego e. about 160 miles n. w. fiom NewYork city, measuring in a straight line. Betweenthis place and Newton, General Sullivan, in his vic-torious expedition against the Indians in 1779, hadadesperate engagement with the Six Nations, whomhe defeated. The Indians werestrongly entrenched,and it required the utmost exertions of the Ame-rican army, with field pieces, to dislodge them ;although the former, including 250 tories, amount-ed only to 800 men, while the Americans were5000 in number, ami well appointed in every re-spect.)

CHENE, a river of Canada, which runs n. w,and enters the river St. Lawrence, opposite thesettlement of New Port.

(CHENENGO is a n. branch of Susquehan-nah river. Many of the military townships arewatered by the n. w. branch of this river. Thetowns of Fayette, Jerico, Greene, Clinton, andChenengo, in Tioga county, lie between this riverand the e. waters of Susquehannah.)

(Chenengo, a post town, and one of the chiefin Tioga county, New York. The settled partof the town lies about 40 miles w. e. from Tiogapoint, between Chenengo river and Susquehan-nah ; has the town of Jerico on the n. By thestate census of 1796, 169 of its inhabitants areelectors. It was taken off from Montgomerycounty, and in 1791 it had only 45 inhabitants.It is 375 miles n. n. w. of Philadelphia.)

(CHENESSEE or GENESSEE River rises in Penn-sylvania, near the spot, which is the highest groundin that state, where the eastern most water of Allegha-ny river, and Pine creek, a water of Susquehannah,and Tioga river, rise. Fifty miles from its sourcethere are falls of 40 feet, and five from its mouth of 75feet, and a little above that of 96 feet. These fallsfurnish excellent mill-seats, which arc improved bythe inhabitants. After a course of about 100 miles,mostly n, e. by n. it empties into lakeQntario, four

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in Nueva Espana, is of a mild temperature ; si-tuate in a pleasant and fertile plain, and one whichabounds in maize, wheat, and other seeds. It con-tains S68 families of Indians, 13 of Spaniards, anda convent of the religious order of St. Francis;is one league n. of its capital,

Chiautla, with the addition of La Sal, an-other settlement, the capital of its jurisdiction, inthe same kingdom, thus called from the salt minesfound in it formerly, and from which the inhabi-tants used to derive a great commerce. At pre-sent it is in a thorough state of decay, not only asits trade has fallen off in the other provinces ; butas the Indians have applied themselves rather tothe cultivation of the soil and the planting of fruitsand pulse, from the traffic of which they derivetheir maintenance. It is inhabited by 650 familiesof Mexican Indians, and 40 of Spaniards, J\/us~iees, and Mulattoes. It contains a convent of thereligious order of St. Augustin. The jurisdictionis so much reduced that it is not more than fiveleagues in length and three in width, void of com-merce, and has but a small revenue. Its inhabi-tants, although they are somewhat given to thebreeding of small cattle, yet this must hardly beconsidered with them a branch of commerce,since they have scarcely enough of these where-with to support theiiiselves. It contains only twoother settlements, and these are,

Xicotlan, Huehetlan.

Forty-five leagues s. e. to the s. w. of Mexico.
CHIBACOA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Venezuela ; situate on the shore ofa river to the w. of the town of Nirua.

CHIBATA, a settlement of the . province andcorregimiento of Tunja in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada, and the head settlement of the corregi-miento of Indies, is of a very cold and fresh tem-perature, abounding in productions, and particu-larly in cattle, from the fleeces and hides of whichare made quantities of blankets, linen cloths, andother articles for garments. It may contain about200 Indians, and it is eight leagues to the n. e.of Tunja, lying between this latter place and thesettlement of Siachoque.

CHIBAI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Collahuas in Peru.

CHICA, an island of the N. sea, one of theLucayas ; situate between the islands Siguate andSt. Andrew. The English gave it the name ofLittle.

CHICACHAE, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Louisiana or S. Carolina, in whichthe English have a fort and establishment to carry

on commerce with the Indians, is situated on theshore of the river Sonlahove.

CHICACHAS, a settlement of Indians of thisnation, in the territory thus called, where the Eng-lish have an establishment or factory for com-merce.

CHICAGOU, a port of Canada, on the w. sideof the lake Michigan.

Chicagou, a river of the same province andgovernment, which runs s. then ?i. e. and entersthe former port.

CHICAHOMINI, a river of the province andcolony of Virginia, runs s.e. and turning itscourse to the s. enters the Thames.

CHICAHUASCO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of Huipuxtla, and alcaldia mayor of Tepe-tango, in Nueva Espana, contains 72 families ofIndians.

CHICAHUASTEPEC, San Miguel de, asettlement of the head settlement of Zoyaltepec, andalcaldia mayor of Yanguitlan. It contains 48 fa-milies of Indians, and is 10 leagues from its headsettlement.

CHICAHUAZTLA, San Andres de, a settle-ment and head settlement of the alcaldia mayor ofTepozcolula, in the province and bishopric ofOaxaca, in the kingdom of Nueva Espana, is ofa cold temperature, inhabited by 332 families ofIndians, including those of the settlements or wardsof its district, and they maintain themselves bybartering cotton garments for salt on the coast ofXicayan ; 12 leagues s. w. of its capital.

Chicahuaztla, another, a small settlement orward of the alcaldia mayor of Guachinango in thesame kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of that ofTlaola.

CHICAMA, a large, fertile, and beautiful valleyof the province and corregimiento of Truxillo inPeru. It was one of the most populous in thetimes of the gentilisra of the Indians, owing to itsagreeable and benign temperature : is watered bya river of its name, which divides it from that ofChimu. In 1540, the friar Domingo de SantoTomas founded here a convent of his order, forthe instruction of the Indians, which immediatelywas turned into a priory and a house for noviciates.It is at present, however, fallen into decay, throughthe ravages of time. This valley is six leaguesfrom the capital, to the n. in the road which leadsto the provinces of Quito, Sana, and Piura.

Chicama, a river of this province and corregi-miento. It rises in the province of Guamachuco,from two very lofty mountains, called Y ulcaguancaand Yanaguanca, to the n. e . ; and waters and fer-

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it has a large proportion of families of Spaniards,Mustees^ and Mulalloes ; besides which, it con-tains 387 of Indians, and a convent of monks ofSt. Francis. Seven leagues to the n. n. w. ofMexico, although the distance is commonly count-ed at only six. Long. 274° 12'. Lat. 19° 50'.

COAUTLA, a province and alcaldia mayor oiNueva España ; bounded s. by the corregimientoof Mexico. It is also called. Of Amilpas. Itsjurisdiction extends 25 leagues ; it is of a warmand moist temperature, but is fertile, and aboundsin wheat, maize, French beans, lentils, barley,and tares, as also in other productions, which serveas a commerce to its natives. Great quantities ofsugar are also manufactured in various mills andmachines for the purpose. This province is water-ed by two rivers, the one very large, called theAmazinaquc, which runs e. and the other, some-what less, to the e . ; in both of them are caughtmany bagres and trout, which, being much es-teemed in the neighbouring provinces, afford alsoanother considerable branch of commerce. It hassilver mines which produce tolerably well, andfrom one, which is vulgarly called La Peregrina,much riches were formerly extracted. The juris-diction consists of the following settlements ;

The capital of the sarne Xamiltepec,

name, Tlacotepec,

Tetelzingo, Zacoalpan,

Tlamimilulpa, Temoaque,

Cacoyoc, Ancuilco.

Ocuituco,

The capital forms three streets, of regular pro-portion and symmetry in the buildings, with twoelegant edifices, one of the monks of St. Domingo,'and the other of the barefooted monks, or Descal-zos, of St. Francis. It contains 36 families of Spa-niards, 70 of 40 of Mulattoes, and 200

of Indians ; the part of the city inhabited by thelatter is never visited by the Spaniards but as awalk, or place of recreation, and the Indians neverattempt to encroach upon the part not appropriatedto them. Twenty-five leagues 5. of Mexico. Long.274° 10'. Lat. 19° 5'.

Same name, another settlement and real of thesilver mines of this province, in which are twosugar mills, and some engines for grinding metal.It contains 56 families of Spaniards, Mustees, andMulattoes, and lies 12 leagues to the s. w. of itscapital.

COAUTLACO, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district and alcaldia mayor of Tlapain Nueva Espana. It contains 35 families of In-dians, and is two leagues to the n. e. of that place.

COAZA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Larecaja in Peru; annexed to the cu-racy of Combaya.

COBAN, a settlement and capital of the pro-vince and alcaldia mayor of Vera Paz in the king-dom of Guatemala. It contains a good convent ofthe order of St. Domingo, and is 30 leagues fromGuatemala.

[COBBESECONTE, or Copsecook, whichin the Indian language signifies the land where stur-geons are taken, is a small river which rises fromponds in the town of Winthorp, in the district ofMaine, and falls into the Kennebeck within threemiles of Nahunkeag island, and 15 from Mooseisland.]

COBEQUIT, a large settlement of the provinceand colony of Nova Scotia; situate on the side ofthe basin of Minas, on the innermost shore of thebay of Fundy.

[Cobequit or Colchester River, in NovaScotia, rises within 20 miles of Tatamogouche, onthe n. e. coast of Nova Scotia ; from thence it runss. ; then s. w. and w. info the e. end of the basinof Minas. At its mouth there is a short bank, butthere is a good channel on each side, which vesselsof 60 tons burden may pass, and go 40 miles .upthe river. There are some scattered settlements onits banks.]

[COBESEY, in the district of Maine. See

PiTTSTO.V.]

[COBHAM, a small town in Virginia, on thes. bank of James river, opposite James town ; 20miles n. w. of Suffolk, and eight or nine 5. w. ofWilliamsburg.]

[Cobh AM Isle, mentioned by Captain Mid-dleton, in the journal of his voyage for finding a71, e. passage. Its two extremities bear n. by e.and e. by n. in lat. 63° «. long. 3° 50' fromChurchill, which he takes to be the Brook Cob-ham of Fox.]

COBIJA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Atacama in Peru, and archbishopricof Charcas; annexed to the curacy of Chinchin.It is founded on the sea-shore, has a good port,where the inhabitants are busied in the fishing forcongers ; and these being called charqnecillos, orsalted, are carried in abundance for sale to theneighbouring provinces, to the sierra, and otherparts. In lat. 23° 20' s. according to Don CosmeBueno ; and according to the ex-jesuit Coleti,in lat. 22° 25' s.

[COBEZA. See Cobija. This obscure portand village is inhabited by about 50 Indianfamilies, and is the most barren spot on thecoast. This is, however, the nearest port to Lipei^where there are silver mines, and also to Potosi,2

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much incommoded by mosquitos ; so that its po-pulation is much reduced, and those that remainapply themselves to the cultivation of sugar-canes,maize, yucas^ and plantains.

COLONCHE, a small settlement of Indians,of the district and jurisdiction of Santa Elena,in the government of Guayaquil, and kingdomof Quito ; situate on the s. shore of a river,from whence it takes its name, in lat. 1° 56' s.The said river rises in the mountains of thedistrict, and enters the S. sea, opposite the islandof La Plata.

Colonche, a small island of the S. sea, nearthe coast of the province and government of Gua-yaquil.

COLONIES OF THE English. See thearticles Virginia, Carolina, New England,New York, Jersey, Massachusetts, RhodeIsland, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia ; of theJ3utch, see Surinam, Berbice, Corentin,CuRAZAo ; of the Portuguese, San Gabriel;of the French, Cayenne, St. Domingo, Mar-tinique; of the Danes, St. Thomas. (See gene-ral Tables of Dominions, &c. in the introductorymatter.)

COLOPO, a large river of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom ofQuito. It runs from s. e. to n. w. at an almostequal distance between the rivers Esmeraldas andVerde, and runs into the S. sea, in the bay of SanMateo, in lat. 58' n.

COLOR, Cabo de, a cape on the coast of theprovince and captainship of Sergipé in Brazil. Itlies between the rivers Real and Ponica.

COLORADA, Punta, a point on the coast ofthe N. sea, and in the province and governmentof Venezuela, to the e. of the cape San Roman.

COLORADA, a river of tlie jurisdiction andalcaldta mayor of Penonomé, in the governmentof Panama, and kingdom of Tierra Firme. It risesin the mountains to the s. and enters the Pacificnear the settlement of Anton.

COLORADO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tucumán, in the district andjurisdiction of the city of Salta, and s. s. e. of thesame.

Colorado, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Santa Marta in the kingdom of TierraFirme; situate on the shore of the river of its name.

Colorado, a river of the province and corre-^imiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile. Itrises in its cordillera, to the n. runs e. and spendsitself in various lakes, on account of the level oftlie country. The geographer Cruz errs in makingit enter the river Maipo.

Colorado, another, a large river of the pro-:vince and government of Sonora in NuevaEspana.

Colorado, another, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Santa Marta in thekingdom of Tierra Firme, which enters the greatriver Magdalena before you come to the townof Tamalameque.

Colorado, another, in the province and go-vernment of Louisiana, near the road wliich leadsto Mexico. It runs s. e. in a very large stream,and enters the sea in the bay of San Bernardo.

Colorado, a cape or point of land of the s.coast of St. Domingo, in the part possessed bythe French, between the bays of Tondo and Puer. .

Colorado, a mountain of the province andgovernment of Tucumán, on the shore of the riverSalado, and to the s. of the settlement of Nuestra'Sefiora de Buenas Costumbres. ;

COLORADOS, a barbarous nation of Indians,of the province and corregimiento of Tacunga inthe kingdom of Quito, who inhabit some moun-,tains of the same name, very craggy and rugged,abounding in animals and wild beasts, such asbears, lions, tigers, deer, squirrels, monkeys, andmarmosets. These Indians, although the greaterpart of them are reduced to the Catholic faith bythe extinguished company of the Jesuits, aregiven to superstition ; they are divided into twoparts, the one called the Colorados of Angamarca,since tlieir principal settlement bears this title, andthe other the Colorados of St. Domingo ; they now,belong to the province and government of Esme-raklas, and live retired in the woods, and upon thebanks of the rivers Toachi and Quininay, wherethe missionaries of the religion of St. Domingo ofQuito exercise their apostolical zeal. The princi-pal settlement of this place, being situate on the w.shore, is called St. Domingo. The commerce ofthese Indians, and by which they subsist, is incarrying to Guayaquil, the province by whichthey are bounded , w dod for making canoes and rafts,sugar-canes, achiote, and agi pepper, and bring-ing back in exchange cattle, fish, soap, and othernecessary eft'ects.

COLOSO, a settlement of the province andgovernment ©f Cartagena ; situate on the shore ofthe river Pechelin, to the s. s. w. of the townof Maria, to the jurisdiction^of which it apper-tains.

COLOTLAN, a settlement and head settlementof the alcaldia mayor of Mextitlan in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 240 families of Indians, and isthree leagues to the w. of its capital.

COLOTLIPAN, a settlement of the head set-

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far as the confines of the akaldia mayof of Tepi-que. It is of an hot temperature, abounding’ inmaize, cotton, cocoa-trees, and other fruits pecu-liar to the climate : and particularly in large andsmall cattle, which breed in numberless wards andcountry estates. It has silver mines, which areworked to tolerable profit. It is but thinlypeopled, and the greater part of its inhabitants arcMustees and Negro slaves. It is watered by theriver Canas, which rises in the jurisdiction ofAcaponeta. The capital is of the same name.This was founded by Nufio de Guzman in 1531,and is the capital of the kingdom, and where thetribunal of royal audience and episcopal see wereerected ; these being afterwards removed to thecity of Guadalaxara. This latter city was at thesame time made the capital, from its proximity tothe shore of the S. sea, its distance from the samebeing only 12 leagues. It was at that time verywealthy, but it afterwards fell to decay ; the pri-macy was also taken from it, and it is nothing nowbut a miserable village. Its natives are the mostpolite and best affected to the Spaniards of any inthe whole kingdom. (To the n. w. of Compos-tela, as well as in the districts of Autlan, Ahux-catlan, and Acaponeta, a tobacco of a superiorquality was formerly cultivated.) Lat. 21° 10' w.Long. 104° 40' w. The settlements of this juris-diction are,

Matanchel, Sapotan,

San Pedro, Mazatlan,

Cali may a, Xaltocan.

Compostela, another city, in the island of St.Domingo. See Azua.

COMPTON, a settlement of the English, in theprovince and colony of Massachusetts ; situate onthe coast, at the entrance of the bay of Buzard.

COMUATO, a small island of the lake or seaof Chalapa, in the district of the alcaldia mayorof Zamora, and kingdom of Nueva Espana. Itis of a hot and moist temperature, surrounded bythick reeds and Indian fig-trees. In the dry sea-son it communicates with the mainland. Its po-pulation is scanty, and consists of 20 families ofSpaniards, and in its plains various herds of largecattle graze. Nine leagues from the capital.

COMUTA, a city of the province and captain-ship of Pará in Brazil, founded in 1581 by JuanPedro de Olivciro, on the e. shore of the riverPaeaxa. It is at present destroyed, and somesmall houses alone remain, where, for the conve-nienee of its situation, a small garrison of Portu-guese resides.

CONAHASET, a rocky shoal of the coast of

the province and colony of New England, at theentrance of port Boston.

CONAICA, a settlement of tlie province andcorrep;imiento of Angaraez in Peru.

(CONAJOHARY, a post-town on the s. side ofMohawk river, New York, very large, 36 milesabove Schenectady, and 318 from Philadelphia.See Canajoiiary.)

CONANAMA, a bay of the province and go-venment of Guayana.

CONANAMA, a river of the same name, in thisprovince.

CONARDO-TUBA, a river of the provincecaptainship o^ Los Ilheos in Brazil. It risesnear the coast, and runs e. between those of theDuna and Ilheos.

(CONAWANGO, a n. branch of Alleghanyriver, in Pennsylvania, which rises from Cha-taughque lake.)

CONCARY, a river of the province and cor-regimiento of Cuyo in the kingdom of Chile. Itrises from a small lake to the e. of the mountain ofthe Pie de Palo, and running s, e. returns, form-ing a curve to the w. when it divides itself into se-veral branches.

CONCEPCION, or Penco, a city of the king-dom of Chile, the capital of the province andcorregimiento of its name, founded in 1550 byPedro de Valdivia. Its situation is upon a barrenand uneven territory, somewhat elevated, on thesea-shore, and on the side of a large, noble, andconvenient bay. On the n. side it is crossed by arivulet, and on the s. it is watered by the riverAndalien, and lies not far from the Biobio. It isa small city, and its houses and buildings arepoor and much reduced. It has, besides the ca-thedral church, convents of the religious orders ofSt. Francis, St. Domingo, La Merced, St. Au-gustin, an hospital of San Juan de Dios, and acollege w hich belonged to the regulars of the com-pany of the Jesuits, and which is the best build-ing in it. Its climate is moderately warm, al-though in the winter the cold is great. It abouiidsgreatly in all kinds of grain, cattle, and deliciousfruits, and these are cultivated in gardens whichare found attached to almost every house. It liesopen on all sides, being commanded by six emi-nences ; amongst the which the most prominent isthat which is called Del Romitorio, and extendsas far as the city. Its only defence is a batteryon a level with the water, which defends the an-choring ground of the bay. The natives resemblethe rest of tliis kingdom : they are strong, robust,valorous, and well made, most dexterous in the3 s 2

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purchase, obtained an act of incorporation, Sep-tember 3, 1655 ; and this was the most distantsettlement from the sea-shore of New England atthat time. The settlers never liad any contest withthe Indians ; and only three persons were ever kill-ed by them within the limits of the town. In1791, there were in this township 225 dwellinglionses, and 1590 inhabitants ; of the latter therewere 80 persons upwards ot 70 years old. For 13years previous to 1791, the average number ofdeaths was 17 ; one in four of whom were 70 yearsold and upwards. The public buildings are, aCongregational church, a spacious stone gaol, thebest in New England, and a very handsome countycourt-house. The town is accommodated withthree convenient bridges over the river ; one ofwhich is 208 feet long, and 18 feet wide, supportedby 12 piers, built after the manner of Charles riverbridge. This town is famous in the history of therevolution, having been the seat of the provincialcongress in 1774, and the spot where the first op-position was made to the British troops, on thememorable 19th of April 1775. The generalcourt have frequently held their sessions here whencontagious diseases have prevailed in the capital.Lat. 42° 20'

(Concord, a small river of Massachusetts,formed of two branches, which unite near thecentre of the town of Concord, whence it takes itscourse in a n. e. and n. direction through Bed-ford and Billerica, and empties itself into Merri-mack river at Tewksbury. Concord river isremarkable for the gentleness of its current, whichis scarcely perceivable by the eye. At low watermark it is from 100 to 200 feet wide, and from threeto 12 feet deep. During floods. Concord riveris near a mile in breadth ; and when viewed fromthe town of Concord, makes a fine appearance.)

(Concord, a township in Delaware county,Pennsylvania.)

(Concord, a settlement in Georgia, on the e.bank of the Mississippi, about a mile from the s.line of Tennessee, 108 miles h. from the mouth ofYazoo river, and 218 bclov/ the Ohio.)

CONDACHE, a river of the province and go-vernment of Quixos in the kingdom of Quito. Itruns n. e. and traversing the royal road whichleads from Baza to Archidono, enters the river Co-quindo on its s. side, in 37' lat.

(CONDE, Fort, or Mobile City, is situate onthe w. side of Mobile bay, in W. Florida, about40 miles above its mouth, in the gulf of Mexico.Lat. 30° 59' n. Long. 88° 11' a'.)

CONDE, a small river of the province andcountry of the Iroquees Indians, in New France or

VOL. I.

Canada. It runs n. and enters the lake On-tario.

CONDE, another of the same name. SecV E H D E .

(CONDECEDO, or Desconocida, a cape orpromontory of N. America, in the province ofYucatán, *100 miles w. of Merida. Lat. 20° 50' n.Long. 90° 45' w.)

CONDEBAMBA, a large and beautiful valleyof the provitice and fo?TCg7'??//f>«/o of Huamachucoin Peru ; celebrated for its fertility.

CONDES, River of the, in the straits of Ma-gellan. It runs into the sea opposite the islandSanta Ana.

CONDESA, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cartagena; situate near the coast,at the mouth of the Dique, which forms a com-munication between the sea and the grand riverMagdalena.

CONDESUIOS DE Arequipa, a provinceand corregimiento of Peru : bounded n. by that ofParinocochas, e. by that of Chumbivilcas, s. e.by that of Canes and Canches, and s. by that ofCollahuas. It is generally of a cold temperature,even in the less lofty parts of the cordillera ; ofa rough and broken territory, and with very badroads. Nevertheless, no inconsiderable proportionof wheat is grown in the low grounds, as likewise ofmaize, and other seeds and fruits, such as grapes,pears, peaches, apples, and some flowers. Upontlie heights breed many vicunas, huanacos, andvizcachas, and in other parts is obtained cochineal,here called macno, and which is bartered by theIndians for baizes of the manufacture of the country,and for cacao. It has some gold mines whichwere worked in former times, and which, on ac-count of the baseness of the metal, the depth of themines, and hardness of the strata, have not pro-duced so much as formerly they did, althoughthey are not now without yielding some emolu-ment : such are those of Airahua, Quiquimbo,Araure, and Aznacolea, which may produce alittle more than the expences incurred in Avorkirigthem. The gold of these mines is from 19 to 20carats, and they produce from tliree to four ounceseach cfljjow. They are Avorked by means of steeland powder, and the metals are ground in mills.The greater part of the natives of tliis province oc-cupy themselves in carrying the productions of thevalley of Mages, of the province of Carnana, suchas Avines and brandies, to the other provinces ofthe sierra; also in the cultivation of seeds, andsome in working the mines. It is watered by somesmall rivers or streams, which, incorporate them-selves, and form t-wm large rivers. The capital is3 T

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CONGACA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Angaraes in Pern ; annexed to theuracy of Yulcamarca.

CONGARI, a large river of S. Carolina. Itruns s. e. taking various names, till it enters thesea. It is first called Trente Milles, or ThirtyMiles, then Congari, and afterwards Santi.

CONGAS, a settlement of the province and ror-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Ocros.

CONGER, Rock of, a small island or rock,close to the e. coast of the island of Barbadoes.

CONGO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Darien, and kingdom of Tierra N ueva ;situate on the shore of a river, which gives itits name, and of the coast of the S. sea, withinthe gulf of S. Miguel.

CONGOHAS, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Espiritu Santo in Brazil ; situate tothe w. of the Villa Rica.

CONGURIPO, Santiago de, a- settlement ofthe head settlement of Puruandiro, and alcaldtamayor of Valladolid, in the province and bishopricof Mechoacan ; situate on a plain or shore of theRio Grande. It is of a hot temperature, and con-tains 12 families of Spaniards and Mustees^ and 57of Indians. Twenty-six leagues from the captitalPasquaro.

CONHAWAY, a large river of N. Carolina.It runs many leagues ; first n. e. then n. and after-wards n. w. and enters the Ohio. It is called alsoWood river and New river.

CONHAWAY, another, in the province and colonyof Virginia, with the additional title of Petit, orLittle. It also runs n. w, and enters the Ohio.

(CONHOCTON Creek, in New York, is then. head water of Tioga river. Near its mouth isthe settlement called Bath.)

CONICARI, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa in Nueva Espana ; situateon the shore and at the source of the river Mayo.It is a reduccion of the missions which were heldby the regulars of the company of Jesuits.

CONIGUAS, a barbarous nation of Indians ofthe province and government of Tarma in Peru,who inhabit the mountains of the Andes, unitedwith the Cunchos, and of whom but little is known.

CONIL, Bocas de, entrances which the seamakes upon the coast of the province of Yucatán,between the river Lagartos, and the baxos or shoalsof Cuyo.

CONILABQUEN, a small river of the districtof Tolten Alto in the kingdom of Chile. It runs s.and enters the Token.

CONIMA, a settlement of the province and cor-

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regimiento of Paucarcolla in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Moxo.

CONNECTICUT, a county of the provinceand colony of New England in N. America. It isbounded w. by New York and the river Hudson ;is separated from the large island by an arm of thesea to the s. ; has to the e. Rhode island, with partof the colony of Massachusetts, and the other partof the same colony to the n. It is traversed by ariver of the same name, which is the largest of thewhole province, and navigable by large vessels for40 miles. This province abounds in wood, tur-pentine, and resins ; in the collecting of whichnumbers of the inhabitants are occupied, althoughthe greater part of them are employed in fishing,and in hewing timber for the building of vesselsand other useful purposes. The merchants of theprovince once sent to King Charles II. some tim-ber or trees, of so fine a growth as to serve formasts of ships of the largest burthen. The greattrade of woods and timbers carried on by meansof the river has much increased its navigation.This territory is not without its mines of metal,such as lead, iron, and copper: the first of thesehave yielded some emolument, but the othershave never yet produced any thing considerable,notwithstanding the repeated attempts which havebeen made to work them. This county is wellpeopled and flourishing, since it numbers upwardsof 40,000 souls, notwithstanding the devastationsthat it has suftered through the French, the In-dians, and the pirates, in the reign of Queen Anne,when all the fishing vessels were destroyed.When this colony was first founded, many greatprivileges were given it, which have always beenmaintained by the English governor, throughthe fidelity which it manifested in not joiningthe insurrection of the province of Massachusetts,until, in the last war, it was separated from themetropolis, as is seen in the article U n ited StatesOF America.

(Connecticut, one of the United States ofNorth America, called by the ancient nativesQunnihticut, is situated between lat. 41° and 42°2' n. and between long. 71° 20' and 7.3° 15' w. Itsgreatest breadth is 72 miles, its length 100 miles;bounded «. by Massachusetts ; e. by Rhode island ;s. by the sound which divides it from Long island ;and w. by the state of New York. This statecontains about 4674 square miles; equal to about2,640,000 acres. It is divided into eight counties,viz. Fairfield, New Haven, Middlesex, and NewLondon, which extend along the sound from w. toc. : Litchfield, Hartford, Tolland, and Windham,extend in the same direction on the border of the]3 T 2

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York, wliicli falls into a bay at the s. side of theisland. It lies two miles to tlies. of Rockonkamapond.)

CONNESTIGUCUNE, an establisliment oftlie English, in the county of Albany, inthew. partand to the e. of Chenectady, or of (he river Mo-hawk, where it gives a fall from above 70 feet inlieiglit. See Arm any.

CONNETABLE, or CoN?)ESTABr^E, a smallisland of tire county of Cayenne, belonging to theFrench, between the city of Cayenne and capeOrange.

CONNETABLE, anotlier small island of tire sameprovince, witli the addition of Petite, to distin-guish it from the former.

CONOCOTO, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the corregimimto of the district of theCinco Leguasde la Ciudad, in the district of whichis a rising ground called A Halo, and upon theskirts of this are many warm-water mineral streams,much frequented as baths for the curing of in-firmities.

CONOMA, a lake of the province and countryof the Amazonas, in the Portuguese possessions.It is formed from some waste water of the riverMadera, very near its shore, and at a small distancefrom the river of Las Amazonas.

CONOME, Cape of, a point of land of thecoast of Nova Scotia, in the bay of Fundy, and inthe most interior part of the same.

CONORIBO, a river of the province and cap-ainship of Seara in Brazil. It rises near the coast,runs n. and enters that of La Concepcion or S.Francisco, and that of La Cruz, and then entersthe sea.

CONOSTEE, a settlement of Indians of N.Carolina ; situate on the shore of the river Eu-phasee.

CONSAHATCHEE, a river of the provinceand colony of Georgia. It runs s. e. and enters thesea.

CONSATA, a settlement of the missions whichwere held by the religious order of St. Augustin,in the country of Paititi, of the province and cor-regimiento of Larecaja in Peru.

CONSETS, Point of, on the e, coast of theisland of Barbadoes, on the side of the point ofBele.

CONSOLACION, Nuestra Senora de, aset-tlement of the government of Neiba in the NuevoReyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of thetown of La Purificacion. It is situate on theshore of the river Pardo, is of a hot temperature,abounding in the vegetable productions of a similar

climate, and in troublesome and venomous in-sects. It contains more than 200 house-keepers.

CONSOLACION, a point or long strip of landcalled Possession, on the n. coast of the straits ofMagellan ; one of those which form Possessionbay, and where are to be seen the ruins of the fortnamed Jesus, which was founded by the AdmiralPedro de Sarin iento.

CONSTANCE, or Constancia, a small cityof the English, in the island of Barbadoes.

CONSTANTINO Perez, an island of theriver Valdivia, in tlie kingdom of Chile, oppositethe same city, with two other small islands, theone before, the other behind it, and which, together,form the celebrated port of this name. The pas-sage on both sides is navigable, but the channel onthe s. side being the most wide, is the course uni-formly taken by large ships and vessels, and in thesame manner the n. channel is mostly, as it isnarrower, entered by frigates and small craft.

CONTAS, Rio das, a river in the provinceand captainship of Ylheos in Brazil. It rises nearthe coast, runs e. and enters the sea in the Barraor Bar of Camamu, in the river of Ylheos.

CONTAS, a town of the above province andkingdom.

(CONTINENTAL Village was situated onNorth river, in New York state. Before its de-struction by Sir Henry Clinton, in October 1777,there were here barracks for 2000 men.)

CONTOOK, a settlement of the English, inthe province of Hampshire, one of the four ofNew England ; situate on the shore of the riverPenny cook.

Contook, a river of the above province. Itrises from a small lake, runs s. then turns e. andenters the Pennycook.

CONTOY, an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of the province and government of Yucatan,close to the cape Cotoche.

CONTRE-PASTURAGE, a river of the pro-vince and colony of Virginia. It runs n. e. andenters the head of the river James.

CONTRERAS, a small island of the S. sea,close to the coast of the province and governmentof Veragua in the kingdom of Tierra Firme.

CONTUMAZA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

CONUCO, a settlement ofthe province and cor-regimiento of Ytata in the kingdom of Chile ; situatenear the coast, opposite the island of Quiriquina.

CONUENTOS, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Rey in Brazil, at the source of theriver Curitaba.

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CORIXAS, a river of the kingdom of Brazil,It rises in the sierra Bermeja, runs n. forming acurve, and eaters the Tocantines near that of LosMonges, according to tl>e account given by thePortuguese.

CORIXAS, some sierras of the same kingdom,which run s. s. e. and are a continuation of thesierra Bermeja ; they then run e. forming acurve, as far as the river Tocantines, and ex-tend their course on as far as the shore of theAraguaya.

CORK, a large bay in the e. coast of the islandof Newfoundland, between the cape Gull and theisland Tuliquet.

CORKAM, a fort of the English, in the pro-vince and colony of Connecticut, one of the fourwhich composQ New England ; situate near thecoast.

CORMA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Quispicanchi in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Papres.

CORMO, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the curacyof Atabillos Altos.

CORNE, an island of the N. sea, near thecoast of Florida, between the islands Vaisseauxand Massacre.

CORNEJO, an island of the S. sea, near thecoast of the province and corregimiento of Are-quipa, opposite the port of Arantae.

(CORNISH, a township in Cheshire county,New Hampshire, on the e. bank of Connecticutriver, between Claremont and Plainfield, about 15miles n. of Charlestown, and 16 s. of Dartmouthcollege. It was incorporated in 1763. In1775 it contained 309, and in 1790, 982 in-habitants.

(CORNWALL, a township in Addison county,Vermont, e. of Bridport, on lake Champlain, con-taining 826 inhabitants.)

(Cornwall, NEW, atownship in Orange coun-ty, New York, of whose inhabitants 350 aredectors.)

(Cornwall, a township in Litchfield county,Connecticut, about nine miles n. of Litchfield, 11s. of Salisbury, and about 40 w. by n. of Hartfordcity.)

(Cornwall, a small town in Upper Canada, onthe bank of Iroquois river, near lake St. Francis,between Kingston and Quebec, containing a smallchurch, and about 30 or 40 houses.)

(Cornwallis, a town in King’s county, in theprovince of New Brunswick, situated on the s. w.side of the basin of Minas ; 18 miles n. w. of Fal-mouth, and 55 n. w. of Annapolis.)

(Cornwallis, also a river in the »arae pro-vince, navigable for vessels of 100 tons five miles ;for vessels of 50 tons, 10 miles.

CORO, Santa Ana de, a city of the provinceand government of Venezuela, thus named in thetime of the Indians, after the district called Coriana.It was founded by Juan de Ampues in 1529.The Weltzers, under the orders of Nicholas Fe-derman, were the first Avho peopled it, giving it thename of Cordoba, to distinguish it from the othercity of the same name which had been founded byGonzalo de Ocampo in the province of Cumana,This name it afterwards lost, and took that ofCoro, which it preserves to this day, from a smallsettlement of Indians thus named. It is of a dryand hot temperature, but so healthy that physiciansare said here to be of no use. The territory, al-though sandy and lack of water, produces everykind of vegetable production ; so that it may besaid to abound in every thing that luxury or con^venience may require. Here are large breeds ofcow-cattle and goats, and a considerable numberof good mules. Its articles of merchandize, suchas cheese, tanned hides, and cacao, meet with aready sale in Cartagena, Caracas, and the island ofSt. Domingo. It has a reduced convent of the re-ligious order of St. Francis, and an hermitagededicated to St. Nicholas. The town is very rich.It was plundered, by the English in 1567. Itschurch was a cathedral, and the head of thebishopric, from the time that it was erected in1532 until 1636, when this title was transferred toSantiago of Caracas. It is two leagues distantfrom the sea, where there is a port insecure, butmuch frequented by trading vessels.

(From the time that the governor began to re-side at Caracas, in 1576, there remained no con-spicuous authority at Coro but the bishop andchapter, and they did all they could to follow th«governor; and indeed, not being able to leaveCoro by legal measures, they put tlieir wishesinto effect by flight, in 1636. At three leaguesfrom the city are lands where they cultivate withsuccess, if not with abundance, all the usual pro-duce of the country. The inhabitants, who aremuch addicted to indolence, glory that they aredescended from the first conquerors of the country ;and there is here, generally speaking, more rankthan wealth, and more idleness than industry. Thelittle trade that is carried on here consists in mules,goats, hides, sheep-skins, cheeses, &c. which comein a great measure from the interior, and thelarger part fromCarora; shipments of these ar-ticles are made for the islands. The most commonintercourse is with Cura 9 oa, from whence they2

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Oaxaca. It contains only 20 families of Indians,wbo live by the cultivation of the cochineal plantand seeds.

COZCATLAN, a settlement and head settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Tasco in NuevaEspana. It contains 200 families of Indians, andis five leagues c. of its capital.

COZEL, a settlement of the jurisdiction andaknld'ia mayor of Culiacan in Nueva Espaila.

COZINAS, a bay of the coast of the provinceand government of Yucatán.

COZINERA, a shoal of rocks on the coast ofthe S. sea, of the province and government ofTierra Firme, very near the point of Paytilla, inthe bay of Panama.

COZOCOZONQUE, a settlement of the headsettlement of Puxmecatan, and alcaldia mayor ofViUalta, in Nueva Espana. It is of a hot tem-perature, contains 85 families of Indians, and is29 leagues to the e. of its capital.

COZTLA, San Miguel de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Coronango, and alcaldiamayor of Cholula, in Nueva Espana. It contains48 families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n.of the capital.

COZUMEL, an island of the N. sea, oppositethe e. coast of Yucatan, to the province and go-vernment of which it belongs. It is 10 leagueslong n. w.f s. w. and from four to five wide. It isfertile, and abounds in fruit and cattle, and iscovered with shady trees. The Indians call it Cu-zamel, which in their language signifies the islandof swallows. Here was the most renowned sanc-tuary of any belonging to the Indians in this pro-vince, and a noted pilgrimage, and the remains ofsome causeways over which the pilgrims used topass. It was discovered by the Captain Juan deGrijalba in 1518, and the Spaniards gave it thename of Santa Cruz, from a cross that was de-posited in it by Hernan Cortes, when he demolishedthe idols, and when at the same time the first massever said in this kingdom of Nueva Espana, wascelebrated by the Fray Bartolome de Olrnedo, ofthe order of La Merced, At present it is inhabitedby Indians only. It is three leagues distant fromthe coast of Tierra Firme.

(CRAB-ORCHARD, a post-town on Dick’sriver, in Kentucky, eight miles from Cumberlandriver, and 25 miles s. e. of Danville. The roadto Virginia passes through this place.)

CRABS, or Boriquen, an island of the N. sea ;situate on the s. side of the island of St. Domingo,first called so by the Bucaniers, from the abundanceof crabs found upon its coast. It is large andbeautiful, and its mountains and plains arc covered

with trees. The English established themselveshere in 1718, but they were attacked and drivenout by the Spaniards of St. Domingo in 17^0, whocould not suffer a colony of strangers to settle sonear them. The women and children were, how-ever, taken prisoners, and carried to the capital andPortobelo. See Boriquen.

CRAMBERRI, a small river of the provinceand colony of N. Carolina. It runs s. and entersthe source of the Conhaway.

CRAMBROOK, a river of the province andcolony of Pennsylvania in N. America.

(CRANBERRY, a thriving town in Middlesexcounty. New Jersey, nine miles e. of Princeton,and 16 s. s. w. of Brunswick. It contains a hand-some Presbyterian church, and a variety of manu-factures are carried on by its industrious in-habitants. The stage from New York to Phila-delphia passes through Amboy, this town, andthence to Bordentown.)

(Cranberry Islands, on the coast of the dis-trict of Maine. See Mount Desert Island.)

(CRANEY, a small island on the s. side ofJames river, in Virginia, at the mouth of Eliza-beth river, and five miles 5. w. of fort George, onpoint Comfort. It commands the entrance of bothrivers.)

(CRANSTON is the s. easternmost townshipof Providence county, Rhode Island, situated onthe w. bank of Providence river, five miles s. ofthe town of Providence. The corajiact part of thetown contains 50 or 60 houses, a Baptist meetinghouse, handsome school-house, a distillery, and anumber of saw and grist mills^and is called Paw-tuxet, from the river, on both sides of whose mouthit stands, and over which is a bridge connectingthe two parts of the town. It makes a pretty ap-pearance as you pass it on the river. The wholetownship contains 1877 inhabitants.)

CRAVEN, a county of the province and colonyof Carolina in N. America, situate on the shore ofthe river Congaree, which divides the provinceinto South and North. It is filled with English andF'rench protestants. The latter of these disem-barked here to establish themselves in 1706, butwere routed, and the greater part put to death bythe hands of the former. The river Sewee watersthis county, and its first establishment was owingto some families wlio had come hither from NewEngland. It has no large city nor any considerabletown, but has two forts upon the river Saute, theone called Sheuinirigh fort, which is 45 miles fromtlie entrance or mouth of the river, and the othercalled Congaree, 65 miles from the other. [It con-tains 10,469 inhabitants, of whom S658are slaves.}

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the most pleasant situation that could be desired, in an inland country, upon a high swelling ridge of sand hills, within 3 or 400 yards of a large and beautiful lake, abounding with fish and fowl. The lake is terminated on one side by extensive forests, consisting of orange groves, overtopped with grand magnolias, palms, poplar, tilia, liveoaks, &c. ; on the other side by extensive green plains and meadows. The town consists of 30 habitations, each of which consists of two houses, nearly of the same size, large, and convenient, and covered close with the bark of the cypress tree. Each has a little garden spot, containing corn, beans, tobacco, and other vegetables. In the great Alachua savannah, about two miles distant, is an inclosed plantation, which is worked and tended by the whole community, yet every family has its particular part. Each family gathers and deposits in its granary its proper share, setting apart a small contribution for the public granary, which stands in the midst of the plantation.]

CUSE, a river of the kingdom of Peru. It rises in the mountains of the province of Moxos, and runs e. w. from the river and lake of Sara to the river Ubay. It follows its course to the n. and enters the last mentioned river. [CUSHAI, a small river which empties into Albemarle sound, between Chowan and the Roanoke, in N. Carolina.] [CUSHETUNK Mountains, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey.]

[CUSHING, a township in Lincoln county, district of Maine, separated from Warren and Thoraaston by St. George's river. It was incorporated in 1789, contains 942 inhabitants, and lies 216 miles w. by n. of Boston.] CUSHNOE, a waterfal of the river Kenebec, in the province of Sagadahoc, opposite fort Wertern. CUSI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Yauyos in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Pampas. CUSIANA, a settlement of the jurisdiction of Santiago de las Atalayas, and government of San Juan de los Llanos, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; annexed to the curacy of Santiago. It is much reduced and very poor, of a hot temperature, and producing only maize, yucas, plantains, &c. Cusiana, a river of the same province (San Juan de los Llanos). It rises from a small lake near the settlement of Gameza, in the jurisdiction and corregimiento of Tunja, and there enters the Mcta.

CUSIBAMBA, a river of the province and corregimiento of Chilques and Masques in Peru. It rises in the cordillera of the Andes, runs w. and en- e u t iers the Apurimac, opposite the settlement of Curaguasi. Cusibamba, a valley of this province.

CUSICAS, a barbarous nation of Indians, who dwell to the e. of the nation of the Chiquitos, and to the n. of the settlement of San Juan Bautista de los Xamoros. All that is known of them is, that they are numerous and ferocious. CUSITAS, a settlement of Indians of the province and colony of Georgia ; situate on the shore of the river Apalachicola. CUSMO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Santa in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Guarmey. [CUSSENS, a small river in Cumberland county, Maine, which runs a s. e. course to Casco bay, between the towns of Freeport and N. Yarmouth.] [CUSSEWAGA, a settlement in Pennsylvania.] CUSSIA, a settlement of the Salivas Indians, forming the greater part of this nation, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada ; situate near the river Sinaruco, in the llanuras or plains of the Orinoco. The Caribes destroyed and burnt it in 1684. CUSSIQUINA, a river of the province and country of Las Amazonas, which laves the territory of the Mayorunas Indians, who live upon its borders to the s. This river, after running many leagues to the n, e. enters the said territory, in lat. 3° 20' *.

[CUSSITAH, an Indian town in the w. part of Georgia, 12 miles above the Broken Arrow, on Chattahoosee river.] CUSTODIO, a river of the kingdom of Brazil. It runs n. n. w. is small, and enters the Tocantines, between that of San Elias and the river Preto or De la Palma. CUSUMPE, a small lake of the province of Hampshire; one of those of New England, between the rivers Pennycook and Pygwaket. CUTACO, a river in a narrow vale of the Andes, the bed of which was ascertained by Humboldt, in 1802, to be at the vast depth of 4200 feet. On its banks are many plantations of sugarcanes. CUTAGOCHI, a settlement of Cherokees Indians, in the province, and colony of S. Carolina ; situate at the source of the river Eu phase, where the English have a commercial establishment. CUTAWA, or Catawba, a river of N. Carolina. It runs n. and enters the Ohio ;. its waters are always full of coal.

CUTERUO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru ; annexed to' the curacy of Huambos.

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