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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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Pichihua,

Yaura,

Marangani,

Tinta,

Pitumanca,

Surimana,

Langui,

Checa,

Asiento de Con-doroma,

Santuario de la Vir-gen de Huancani,

San Pedro de Cacha,

Combapata,

Pueblo Nuevo,

Santuario de Tan-gascucal,

Quehue,

Coporaque,

Candelaria.

Its repartimiento amounted to 112,500 dollars,and it paid 900 dollars yearly for alcavala. Thecapital is Tinta.

CANETE, a province and corregimiento ofPeru. Its jurisdiction begins six leagues s. ofLima, and extends as far as 35, following thecoast of the Pacific ocean. It is bounded on then. e. by the province of Huarochiri, on the e. byYauros, on the s. by Yca, on the s. e. by CastroVireyna, and on the w. by the sea. It is 31 leaguesin length from n. to s. and from eight to nine inwidth, from e. to w. It is watered by some streams,of which the most considerable are the Mala onthe n. which rises from the lake Huasca-cocha,in the province of Yauyos, and the Cañete. Onits coast are many small ports and bays, thoughvery insecure and of unequal bottom. It aboundsin wheat, maize, sugar-cane, and all sorts offruit. The lands of this province belong for themost part to noble families at Lima, with whichcapital it carries on a considerable trade in fish,(brought from the coast), in fruit and vegetables,salt procured from the salt grounds of Chielca,and in nitre brought from the town of Mala.Its corregidor used to have a repartimiento of124,000 dollars, and it paid 992 yearly for alca-vala. The settlements of this province are,

Cañete, San Pedro de Mala,

Chilca, Pacarán,

Calango, Almagro,

Chincha, Lunaguana,

Tanqui, Zuñiga.

Coillo,

Canete, a river of the same province, whichrises from the lake Tiell-cocha in Yauyos. Itruns to the w. and enters the sea near the Herbae.At its entrance are to be seen the remains of a fortwhich belonged to the Incas of Peru.

Canete, some islands near the coast of thesame province.

Canete, a port in the same province, fre-quented by small vessels. It is very confined andinsecure.

CANGREJILLOS, a settlement of the pro-vince and government of Tucumán, and juris-

diction of Jujuy, situate on the shore of the riverLaquiaca.

CANGREJO, a large settlement of the sameprovince and government as the former, and ofthe same jurisdiction, situate likewise on the shoreof that river.

CANGREJOS, Island of the, lies at the en-trance of the river Orinoco, in its principal mouth,called Navios, on the n. side. Mr. Bellin callsit Cangray. It is small, and inhabited by CaribeeIndians.

CANI, a settlement of the province and corre-gimiento of Huanuco in Peru, annexed to the cu-racy of Santa Maria del Valle.

(CANIADERAGO, a lake in Otsego county,New York, nearly as large as Otsego lake, andsix miles w. of it. A stream called Oaks creekissues from it, and falls into Susquehannah river,about five miles below Otsego. The best cheesein the state is said to be made on this creek.)

CANIBALES, or Caribes, a barbarous na-tion of Indians, who are, according to their name,cannibals, inhabiting the islands of the Antillesbefore they were taken and conquered by the Spa-nish, English, and French. There are few ofthese Indians at the present day inhabiting thoseislands ; the greater part are to be found in Domi-nica, which is entirely possessed by them ; theyadore a man who they affirm was uncreated, andthe first of all men, who descended from heaven,and was called Longuo, from whose navel wereborn other men , and some also from his legs, whichhe himself cleft open with a hatchet. With theManicheans, they believe in the two original causesof good and evil, and in the immortality of thesoul ; and whenever any one dies they bury withhim his slaves and servants, thinking they maybe of use to him in the other world. They arepolygamists, very cruel, but dexterous in the useof the bow and arrow ; they are to be found alsoin other parts of the continent. [See Caribes.]

(CANICODEO Creek, a s. w. head water ofTioga river in New York, which interlocks withthe head waters of Genessee river, and joins Co-nesteo creek 26 miles w. n. w. from the Paintedpost.)

CANICUARIS, a barbarous nation of Indians,who live scattered in the woods of Rio Negro tothe n. of Marañon. It is but little known.

CANIN, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chancay in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Canchas.

CANIS, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of Tillos.

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America, having an excellent port, three leaguesin length, and in which there are many othersmall islands. On the adjoining mainland thereis a river called De Salmones, (salmon), on ac-count of its abounding with these fish, of whichindeed great quantities are taken, as they are es-teemed the finest species of fish of any in that partof the world .

Canseau, a small settlement of the sameisland, which was burnt by the French in the warof 1744.

Canseau, a cape of the same island, at the en-trance of the straits, and also a sand-bank at themouth of them.

CANTA, a province and government of Peru,bounded on the n. e. and e. by Tarma, on the w.by Chancay, partly by the corregimiento of Cer-cado, and on the s. by Huarochiri. It is 24leagues in length n. to s. and 35 in width e. to w.Its territory is generally uneven, being in the cor-dillera. It has some deep pits or canals, on thesides of which, and in small spots, they sow andcultivate vegetables, fruits, and potatoes. Thebreed of cattle is by no means inconsiderable here,and there are to be found most of the wild animalswhich are natives of the sierra, namely, vicuñas,(wild goats), and sheep peculiar to these countries,and differing from those of Europe. In this pro-vince as well as in nearly all those of the sierra,there is scarcely any wood for the purposes ofcooking, and this want is supplied by the use ofturf, which makes a lively fire, but which is veryapt to smoke. Those parts which are called que-bradas, or rugged and uneven, are very sickly,and are subject to two species of maladies com-mon to other cold climates in this country ; theone is that of warts, which not budding in duetime, often become exceedingly troublesome, andeven dangerous ; the other of corrosive sores,shewing themselves particularly upon the face,and are difficult to be cured, and which are attri-buted to the sting of an insect called uta. Somemines of silver were formerly worked here, whichwere so abundant, that they used to render 200marks each cajon, (an excavation of 20 feet square,more or less), but these, from not being regularlyworked, are filled with water. Here are also twohills of loadstone, as also some minerals of alum,copper, and red lead. The following rivers taketheir rise in this province : The Carabaya from thelakes Tacaimbaba and Lorococha, which emptythemselves into the sea on the n. of Lima ; andthe Pasamayo, which runs to the s. of Chancay,first receiving the waters of some hot medicitialsprings. Its corregidor used to receive a repar-

timiento of 125,000 dollars, and it paid yearly1000 for alcavala.

The capital is a town of the same name, in lat.11° 10' s. and its jurisdiction comprehends 62others, which are,

Carhua, Arahuay,

Obrajillo, Anaica,

Parsamaria, Quiby,

Chaqui, Pirca,

Pamacocha, Cotoc,

Carhuacayan, Chaupic,

Yanta, Pampas,

Pari, Marco,

Uchayucarpa, Rauma,

Huaillas, Huacos,

Huasichao, Biscas,

Pacaraos, Yazú,

Uschaicocha, Yanga,

Santa Cruz, Baños,

Santa Catarina, Carae,

Chauca, San Agustin,

Rivira, Huamantanga,

Chupas, Sumbirca,

Culli, San Buenaventura,

Vircay, Huaros,

Atabillos Altos, San Lorenzo,

Pasa, Mayo,

Chisque, Alpamarca,

Huanoquin, Atabillos Baxos,

Cormo, Huaicoi,

Lampian, Puruchucu,

Pallas, Ama,

San Juan, San Joseph,

Quipan, Culluay,

Guandaro, Pampacocha,

San Miguel, Quizú.

CANTANABALO, a river of the province andgovernment of San Juan de los Llanos in thenew kingdom of Granada. It rises between theCaviusari and the Sinaruco, and running nearlyparallel with them, enters into the Orinoco.

CANTERBURY, a fort of the province ofHampshire, one of the four composing the colonyof New England. It is built on the shore of theriver Pennycook, and at the mouth of the water-course formed by the lake Winnipisiokee.

(Canterbury, a township in Windhamcounty, Connecticut, on the w. side of Quinna-baug river, which separates it from Plainfield.It is seven miles e. by s. of Windham, and about10 or 12 n. of Norwich.)

CANTLA, a small settlement of the head set-tlement and alcaldía mayor of Cuquio in NuevaEspaña, situate on the n. of its capital.

(CANTON, a new township in Norfolk county,

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CARACAS.

ico, of the religious order of St. Dominic ; electedbishop in 1610, and was from thence translated tothe bishopric of Oaxaca.

10. Don Fr. Gonzalo de Angulo, of the orderof St. Francis, native of Valladolid ; he was su-perior of the convent of Segovia, difinidor of theprovince of Castilla, qualificator of the inquisi-tion ; elected bishop in 1617, visited his bishopric,where he spent more than three years, confirmed3000 persons, and founded many grammar-schools ;he died in 1633.

11. Don Juan Lopez Agurto de la Mata, na-tive of the Mandof Tenerife, canon of the churchof the Puebla de los Angeles, prebendary of thatof Mexico, rector of the college of Los Santos,and lecturer in its university ; he was elected bishopof Puertorico in 1630, and promoted to this in1634 ; in which time the cathedral was removedfor the sake of security: in 1637 he died.

19. Don Fr. Mauro de Tobar, of the order ofSt. Benedict, native of Villacastin, prior and ab-bot of the monastery of Valladolid, and afterwardsof Monforte, preacher to Philip IV. ; elected tothis bishopric in 1639: immediately upon his tak-ing possession of it a great earthquake happened,and destroyed the cathedral, which he was rebuild-ing, when he was translated to the bishopric ofChiapa in 1655.

13. Don Fr. Alonso Briceño, of the order of LaMerced, of the province and kingdom of Chile;he entered Caracas in the year 1659, and diedin 1667.

14. Don Fr. Antonio Gonzales de Acuña, of theorder of St. Dominic, postulador in the court ofRome ; he was elected bishop in 1676, and diedin 1682.

15. The Doctor Don Diego de Baños and Soto-mayor, native of Santa Fe of Bogotá, head colle-giate of the college of the Rosario in this city,honorary chaplain to Charles II. and canon ofCuenca ; he was promoted to the mitre of SantaMarta in 1684 ; he founded the Tridentine col-lege, having endowed the same with professorshipsand revenues ; and being removed to the arch-bishopric of Santa Fe, he died in the year 1706.

16. Don Fr. Francisco del Rincon, of the reli-gious order of the Minims of St. Francis de Paula,native of Valladolid ; he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Domingo in 1711, and fromthence to that of Santa Fe in 1717.

17. Don Juan Joseph de Escalona y Calatayud,was born at Rioja, became doctor of theology atSalamanca, canon of Calahorra, and first chap-lain in the court of Madrid ; he was elected bishop

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of Caracas, for his charity to the poor, in the year1719, and thence translated to the bishopric of Me-choacau in 1728.

18. Don Joseph Feliz Valverde, native of Gra-nada ; he passed his youth at Mexico, where hewas collegiate of the college of San lldefonso, doc-tor of theology, and of both laws, magistrate anddean of the church of Oaxaca ; elected bishop in1731, and promoted to the church of Mechoácan ;which last appointment he declined : he diedin 1741.

19. Don Juan Garcia Padiano ; who took pos-session in 1742, and died in 1746.

20. Don Manuel Breton, doctoral canon of thechurch of Badajos ; he died in going over to beconsecrated at Cordova in 1749.

21. Don Manuel Machado y Luna, honorarychaplain to his Majesty, and administrator of thecollege of Santa Isabel, native of Estremadura :he studied at Salamanca, obtained the title of pri-mate of canons ; reputed for one of the wisest inecclesiastical discipline ; was made bishop of Ca-racas in 1750, and died in 1752.

22. Don Francisco Julian Antolino, native ofZamora, an eminent theologist, penitentiary ca-non of Badajoz, and bishop of Caracas in 1753 :he died in 1755.

23. Don Miguel Argüelles, principal theologist,and curate in the archbishopric of Toledo ; electedbishop in 1756, and immediately after auxiliarybishop of Madrid.

24. Don Diego Antonio Diaz Madroñero, nativeof Talarrubias in Estremadura, vicar of the cityof Alcalá ; he entered upon his functions in 1757,and died in 1769.

25. Don Mariano Marti, of the principality ofCataluña, ecclesiastical judge and vicar-generalof the archbishopric of Tarragona, doctor in theuniversity of Cervera ; he was promoted to thebishopric of Puertorico in 1770.

Governors and Captains-General of the provinceof Caracas, or Venezuela.

1. Ambrosio de Alfinge ; nominated first gover-nor, and elected by the Weltzers: he drew up thearticles of stipulation with the Emperor in the con-quest of Venezuela ; was founder of the city ofCoro ; took possession of the government in 1528,and retained it till 1531, when he was killed by theIndians in satisfaction of the cruelties he had com-mitted.

2. Juan Aleman, related to the Welzers ; he, byway of precaution, assumed the title of governorwhile the place was vacant, and held it until thearrival of the proper person.

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CARACAS.

SOT

[Of the population two tenths are whites, tlireeslaves, four freedmen and their descendants, andthe remainder Indians. There is scarcely any emi-gration from Spain to Tierra Firme. The govern-ment of Caracas, like tliat of other parts of SpanishAmerica, is so constituted as to keep it dependenton the parent country. The governor or captain-general represents the monarch, and commands themilitary force. There are delegated governors,who have each an assessor : the royal audience ofCaracas consists of a president, who is tlie captain-general, a regent, three judges, two fiscals, onefor criminal afi’airs, the other for the finances, witha reporter and other necessary officers. It adminis-ters justice, regulates the finances, and has othergreat prerogatives. The naval force of TierraFirme is trifling, and could not resist a single frigate.Several sea-ports have fortresses. Maracaibo has25,000 inhabitants, is defended by three forts andfour companies of troops of tlie line, and a propor-tion of militia. The haven or port of Coro, calledLa Vela de Coro, sixteen leagues e. of Maracaibo,had at the time of General Miranda’s expedition in1S06, two batteries with 15 or 18 pieces of cannonof various calibres from six to 18 pounders. PuertoCabello, 58 leagues to the e. of Coro, has a strongfort with a large and numerous artillery. In timeof war it is supplied with two companies of regulartroops. In case of attack, says Depons, 3000militia might be collected here in eight days. LaGuaira, the haven of Caracas, 25 leagues to the e.of Puerto Cabello, is very strongly fortified. Cu-mana, 100 leagues e. of La Guaira, is of difficultaccess, has a fort, and might collect a force of 5000men. The island of Margareta, four leagues n. ofCurnana, has trifling batteries, one company of re-gular troops, one of artillery, and several of militia.Thus it appears tlie strong places are distant fromeach other (30 or 100 leagues ; hence it is observed,a debarkation on the coast might easily be efl'ectedin various places, and the troops proceed into thecountry, whilst the ships, by attacking the forts,would distract the military operations. The mili-tary force, as stated by Depons, is a regiment of re-gular troops of 918 fnen, distributed at Caracas,La Guaira, and Puerto Cabello: 400 troops of theline are at Maracaibo, at Curnana 150, at Guiana150, and at Barpias 77. The artillery at the re-spective {jlaces is served by separate companiesbesides militia ; the whole armed force of the cap-tainship-genera^regulartroopsand militia, is statedat 13,059. There is no religion but the HomanCatholic. To be suspected of heresy is dangerous ;to be convicted, fatal. The tribunals of the in-quisition are erected at Mexico, Lima, and Carta-

gena, and are very powefful. They prohibit badbooks to the number of 5420. Spanish Americaabounds in priests, who are held in great respect ;the missionaries are numerous ; the churciies aredecent and often elegant. The tithes are paid, onetenth part to the king, one fourth to the bisliop, onefourth to the chapter, and remainder to the parishpriests and to other pious uses. The income of thebishop of Caracas is 40,000 dollars. The produc-tions of this region are cacao, coffee, sugar, indigo,and tobacco. Besides the present products, thereis a great variety 'of others which the soil offers tothe inhabitants, without requiring any advance, orsubjecting them to any trouble, but that of collect-ing and bestowing on them a light a?id easy pre-paration. Among these Depons mentionswild cochineal, dyeing woods and barks, gums,rosin, and medical oils, herbs, roots and bark formedicine. From this country half Europe mightbe supplied with wood for its furniture and cabinet-work. Commerce might draw much from the ani-mal kingdom. The neat cattle are calculated at1,200,0(X) ; horses and mares 180,000 ; and mulesat 90,000 ; sheep are innumerable, and deer abun-dant : notwithstanding this abundance, agricultureis at a low ebb in this country. La Guaira,Puerto Cabello, Maracaibo, Curnana, Barcelona,and Margareta, havearight to trade with the mothercountry. In 1796 the imports from Spain to Ca-racas were estimated at 3,1 18,8117^^ dollars, andthe exports at 283,316 dollars. There is a limitedtrade to the other colonies, which brings about400,000 dollars into the country. It exports toforeign West India islands articles of its own pro-duce, except cacao, in neutral bottoms ; part of thereturns must be in Negroes or in farming or house-hold utensils, and the remainder in specie. Butthis remainder is principally smuggled in manu-factured goods. The contraband trade, dividedchiefly between Jamaica, Curasao, and Trinidad,was estimated at 750,000 dollars annually beforethe war of 1796. It has increased greatly sincethat period. The whole regular exports of Ca-racas from 1793 to 1796 are stated at 12,252,415dollars ; from 1797 to 1800, 6,442,318 dollars.The finances of Caracas are under the direc-tion of an intendant. The revenue arises prin-cipally from the customs, a duty of five per cent,on sales from stamps, licences, and tithes, andfrom the produce of the cruzada and of the sale oftobacco. T’he two last are destined for the treasuryat home. There is usually a deficit, even in timeof peace ; in 1797 the receipt was 1, 147,788 dol-lars ; expenditure, 1,886,363. According toHumboldt, the dollars imported into Caracas in j

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CARTAGENA.

San Nicolas de laPaz,

San J uan de lasPalmas,

Pueblo Nuevo,Santero,

Lorica,

San Nicolas deBari,

San Bernardo A-bad,

Morales,

Babilla,

Tablada,

Tiquicio de Aden-tro,

Tiquicio de Afu-era,

Majagua,

Nechi,

San Marcos,

San Pelajo,

Zerete,

Zienega del Oro,San Carlos de Co-losina.

San Geronimo deBuenavista.

The capital is a large city adorned with beauti-ful buildings, founded by Pedro de Heredia in1533, on the shore of a great and very convenientbay more than two leagues in length. It was call-ed Calamari in the time of the Indians, which sig-nifies, in their language, the land of craw-fish, fromthe abundance of these found in it. It is situateon a sandy island, which forming a narrow strait,gives a communication to the part called TierraBomba ; on the left it is entered by a woodenbridge, having a suburb called Xiximani, whichis another island uniting with the continent bymeans of a bridge in the same manner as itself.It is well fortified, and is the residence of a go-vernor, with the title of captain-general, dependenton the viceroy of Santa Fe, having beeu indepen-dent till the year 1739. Besides the precinct andbastions, it has a half-moon, which defends theentrance or gate ; and at a small distance is thecastle of San Felipe de Baraxas, situate on aneminence, and on the side of the bay the castles ofSan Luis, Santa Cruz, San Joseph, San P'elipe,and Pastelillo, which were rebuilt in a modernmanner, in 1654;, by the Lieutenant-general DonIgnacio de Sala, with the names of San Fernando,San Joseph, El Angel, and El Pastelillo. Thecathedral church is magnificent, and included in itis the parish of Sagrario, besides two other pa-rishes called La Trinidad and Santo Toribo. Ithas the convents of monks of St. Francisco, St.Domingo, St. Augustin, St. Diego, La Merced,and San Juan de Dios, which is an hospital, andsituate at the top of a high mountain without thewalls of the city, at a quarter of a league’s dis-tance from the convent of the barefooted Augustins,called Nuestra Senora de la Popa ; to this con-vent vessels are accustomed to offer up a salutationas soon as they discover it at sea. It has also acollege which belonged to the society of Jesuits,a convent of Santa Clara, one of the Observersof San Francisco, and another of barefooted Car-

melites. At a small distance without the city isthe hospital of San Lazaro for lepers, which ma-lady is epidemical in the country. It has also atribunal of the inquisition, established in 1610, ofwhich there is only three in all America, and put-tingthis city, in this pointof view, onafooting withthe metropolitan cities Lima and Mexico. It is thehead of a bishopric erected in 1534 by his holinessClement VII. The bay abounds in fish of variouskinds, but it is infested by marine wolves. Theclimate of this city is very hot ; from May to No-vember, which are the winter months, thunder,rain, and tempests are very frequent, but fromthis inconvenience they derive an advantage offilling with water their cisterns, called aijibes, andwhich afford them the only supply of this inostnecessary article ; accordingly every house is fur-nished with one of these cisterns : from Decemberto April, which is the summer, the heat is exces-sive, occasioning continual perspiration, whichdebilitates the frame, and causes the inhabitants tohave a pale and unhealthy appearance, althoughthey nevertheless enjoy good health, it being notunusual to find amongst them persons exceeding80 years of age. The irregularity of this climateproduces several very afflicting disorders, as theblack vomit, which is most common amongststrangers and sea-faring people, few of whom havethe luck to escape it, but no person ever has ittwice. The inhabitants are likewise much trou-bled with the leprosy, or disease of St. Lazarus ; theculebrilla, which is an insect which breeds under theskin, and causes a swelling which is accustomed toterminate in gangrene and spasms or convulsions :besides these inconveniences, there are multitudesof troublesome insects which infest the houses,such as beetles, niguas, scorpions, centipeds, andmorcielagos. The largest trees are the caob, thecedar, the maria, and balsam ; of the first aremade canoes, out of the solid trunk, for fishing andcommerce ; the red cedar is better than the white,and the two last, not to mention their utility fromthe compactness of their timber, for their delicioussmell and beautiful colour, are the trees fromwhence are procured those admirable distillationscalled the oil of Maria and balsam of Tolu. Hereare also tamarind trees, medlars, sapotas, papai/as,cassias, and Indian apple trees, producing deli-cate and pleasant fruits ; the fruit, however, of thelast mentioned is poisonous, and many who, de-ceived by the beauty of these apples, have therashness to taste them, soon repent of their folly,for they immediately swell to a distressing degree :so if perchance any one should sleep under itsbranches, he will be afflicted in the same way.

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CARTAGENA.

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The antidote, however, is oil taken in abundanceinternally, and applied outwardly. Neither wheatnor barley are known here, but the place aboundsin maize and rice, of which they make cakes, andwhich are the common bread of the natives, andmore particularly so that called cazave^ being asort of cake made of the root yiica^ name, or mo-niato. There are also a great number of cottontrees. The arms of this city are a green crossupon a gold ground, with a lion rampant oneach side. It was sacked in 1593 by RobertBaal, a pirate ; in 1583, by Sir Francis Drake, 23years from the time of its being fortified, and notfrom its foundation, as according to Mr. La Ma-tiniere ; again iti 1695, by Mr. Ducase, assisted bythe adventurers or fiibustiers, who completely pil-laged it : but a great sensation having been causedamongst the inhabitants at the loss of a superb se-pulchre made of silver, in which it rvas usual ona good Friday to deposit the eucharist, they hadthe good fortune to obtain its restitution throughthe interest and favour of Louis XI F. TheEnglish, under the command of Admiral Vernonand Sir Charles Ogle, besieged this city in 1740,when, although its castles were destroyed, andit was completely besieged, it would not surren-der, being gloriously defended by the viceroyDon Sebastian de Esiava, and Don Bias de Lezo,who caused the English to abandon the enterprisewith precipitancy and with great loss. [For thisconduct on the part of the English, several reasonswere assigned besides the strength of the place ;namely, the mortality among the troops, wantof skill in the commanders, and certain ditferencesbetween the admiral and the general. The forti-fications which they demolished have since beenrepaired.] It is the only part of all America wherethere is etfective coin of a fourth part of a real insilver. Its inhabitants amount to 9160 souls incommunion. It has been the native place of manycelebrated persons, such are,

Don Augustin Samiento de Sotomayor, of the or-der of Santiago, viscount of Portillo.

Don Andres de la Vega, professor at Salamanca,a famous lawyer.

Fray Carlos de Melgarejo, a religious Domini-can, an excellent preacher, and a man of unble-mished life.

Don Caspar de Cuba and Arce, head collegiateof San Marcos de Lima, oidor of Chile.

Don Gonzalo de Herrera, Marquis of Villalta,governor of Antioquia.

Don Gregorio Castellar y Mantilla, governor ofCumana, and general of the armada of the guardof the coasts of Cartagena.

Don Joseph de Paredes, captain of infantry,knight of the order of Santiago.

Fray Joseph Pacheco, of the order of St. Au-gustin, master, visitor, and vicar-general i:i his pro-vince of the Nuevo Reyno.

The Father Joseph de Urbina, of the extin-guished company, rector of the college of SantaFe.

Don.Iuan Fernandez Rosillo, dean of the churchof his country, bishop of V^erapez and of Mecho-acan .

Fray Juan Pereyra, a religious Dominican.

Don Lope Duke Estrada, kiiight of the order ofSantiago.

It is in long. 75° 24' and lat. 10° 25' n. [Foraccount of the present revolutions, see Vene-zuela.]

Bishops who have presided in Cartagena.

1. Don Fray Tomas del Toro, a monk of theorder of St. Domingo, elected the . first bishop in1532; but being at Talavera, his country, at thetime, he unfortunately died before he was conse-crated.

2. Don Fray Geronimo de Loaisa, a Dominicanmonk, renowned for his virtue and talent, and forhis experience in Indian affairs ; he was elected inthe room of the former, was consecrated at Valla-dolid, and there he erected the church into a ca-thedral in 1538, the same year in which he enteredCartagena ; from hence he was promoted to thearchbishopric of Lima in 1542.

3. Don Fray Francisco de Santa Maria y Bena-vides, of the order of St. Gerome, of the illustriousfamily of the Marquises of Fromesta ; serving atthat time the Emperor in Flanders, he took to areligious life, and was elected bishop of Cartagenain 1543. The city, in his time, was plundered bytwo pirates, lieaded by the Spanisli pilot AlonsoVexines, who cominitted thisactout of revenge fora flogging he had received ; they also ill-treatedthe venerable prelate, who had the additional griev-ance, in the year L551, of witnessing the city inflames. In 1554 he was promoted to the churchof Modonedo in Galicia, and was succeeded inCartagena by,

4. Don Fray Gregorio de Beteta, a Dominicanmonk, brought up in the convent of Salamanca, andone of the twenty who went to the Nuevo Reynode Gratiada, from whence he passed over to Mex-ico to convert the Indians, and afterwards withthe same object to the provinces of Santa Marta,Uraba, ami Cartagena ; and being teacher amicurate in one of his settlements, he received theorder of presentation to this bishopric in 1555 ;although he endeavoured to decline the dignify,

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CARTAGENA.

he was at length persuaded to accept it by the ac-clamations and remonstrances of all parties, andespecially of the vicar-general of his order; hebegan to preside without being consecrated ; butbeing yet full of scruples, he renounced the office,and without permission returned to Spain ; h^ thenwent to Koine, but being desired by his holiness toreturn to his diocese, he was said to have been somuch affected as not to have been able to prevailupon himself to enter the city : he returned, there-fore, immediately to the coast, and embarked forFlorida, with a view of converting some of theinfidels ; and with this object he again set off forSpain, in order to obtain his renunciation ; whenbeing at length tired with his wanderings, andAvorn out Avith age, he died in his convent of To-ledo in 1562.

5. Don Juan de Simancas, native of Cordova,collegian of San Clemente de Bolonia ; he enteredin 1560, went to be consecrated at Santa Fe, andupon his return, had the mortification to find thatthe suburbs of Xiximani had been sacked by someFrench pirates ; which disaster was again repeatedin the following year, 1561. This bishop, afterhaving governed his church for the space of 10years, and suffering much from the influence of ahot climate, left the see without a licence, andreturned to his country, where he died in1570.

6. Don Ft. Luis Zapata de Cardenas, of theorder of St. Francis, native of Llerena in Estre-madura, third commissary-general of the Indies ;elected bishop in 1570, promoted to the archbi-shopric of Santa Fe before he left Spain, and in hisplace was chosen,

7. Don Fr. Juan de Vivero, a monk of the or-der of St. Augustin, native of Valladolid ; hepassed over into America, was prior of the conventof Lima, founder of the convent of Cuzco, electedbishop, which he renounced ; nor would he ac-cept the archbishopric of Chacas, to which he waspromoted : he died in Toledo.

8. Don Fr. Dionisio de los Santos, of the orderof Santiago, prior of the convent of Granada, andprovincial of the province of Andalucia ; electedin 1573 : he died in 1578.

9. Don Fr. Juan de Montalvo, of the same orderof St. Domingo, native of Arevalo ; elected bishop,he entered Cartagena in 1579, passed over to SantaFe to the synod celebrated there by the archbishop ;and in 1583 had the mortification of seeing hiscity sacked, plundered, and destroyed by SirFrancis Drake; Avhich calamity had such a greateffect upon him, and well knowing noAV that hehad no means of relieving the necessities of the

poor, who were dependent upon him, he fell sickand died the same year.

10. Don Fr. Diego Osorio, of the same orderof St. Domingo ; he went over as a monk to Car-tagena, from thence to Lima and Nueva Espana,received the presentation to this bishopric in 1587,which he would not accept, and died in 1579, inMexico.

11. Don Fr. Antonio de Hervias, also a Domi-nican monk, collegian of San Gregorio de Valla-dolid, his native place, where he had studiedarts ; he passed over to Peru, and was the firstmorning-lecturer in the university of Lima, ma-nager of the studies, qualificator of the inquisition,vicar-general of the province of Quito, and after-wards presented to the bishopric of Arequipa,then to that of Verapaz, and lastly to that of Car-tagena, where he died in 1590.

12. Don Fr. Pedro de Arevalo, monk of the or-der of St. Gerome ; he was consecrated in Spain,and renounced the bishopric before he came totake possession of it.

13. Don Fr. Juan de Ladrada, a Dominicanmonk, native of Granada ; he A^'as curate and re-ligious instructor in the Indies, in the settlements ofSuesca and Bogota, vicar-general of his religionin the Nuevo Reyno de Granada, lecturer on thesacred scriptures and on theology in Santa Fe,'was consecrated bishop of Cartagena in 1596 : herebuilt the cathedral, established a choir of boysand chaplains, and made a present of a canopy tobe carried by the priests over the blessed sacra-ment when in procession ; he assisted at the foun-dation of the college of the regulars of the societyof Jesuits, and of that of the fathers called thebarefooted Augustins, on the mountain of LaPopa ; he had the satisfaction of having for hisprovisor the celebrated Don Bernardino de Al-mansa, a wise and virtuous man, who was after-Avards archbishop of Santa Fe ; he frequentlyvisited his bishopric, and after having governed17 years, died in 1613.

14. Don Fr. Pedro de Vega, a monk of thesame order of St. Domingo, native of Bubiercain the kingdom of Aragon, professor of theologyand of the sacred AA'ritings in the universities ofLerida and Zaragoza ; he entered Cartagena asbishop in 1614, and his short duration disappintedthe hopes he had so universally excited, for hedied in 1616.

15. Don Diego Ramirez de Zepeda, friar of theorder of Santiago, native of Lima, a renownedpreacher, and consummate theologist ; being atMadrid, he was elected, and died before he couldreach the bishopric.

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16. Don FV. Diego de Tores Atamairano, amonk of the order of St. Francis, native of Trux-illo in Estremadura, commissary-general of theprovinces of Peru ; he received his consecration atEiraa, entered Cartagena in 1620, and died in thefollowing year, 1621.

17. Don Fr. Francisco de Sotomayor, of theorder of St. Francis, native of San Tome, in thebishopric of Tuy, guardian of the convents inMontforte and Salamanca, difimdor general in thechapter which was celebrated at Rome ; elected tothe bishopric of Cartagena in 1622, and promotedto that of Quito before he left Madrid, in 1623.

18. Don Fr. Luis Ronquillo de Cordova, of theorder of the Santissirna Trinidad, native of Gra-nada, where he read arts and theology, was mi-nister in the convent of Malaga, and twice in that ofSeville, provincial and vicar-general of Andalucia ;he was elected bishop in 1630 : he governed eightyears, and returned to Spain without a licence ;he received notice of his promotion to the bishop-ric of Truxillo in Peru, which honour he declined,and retired to his convent in Granada, where hedied in 1642.

19. Don Fr. Christoval Perez de Lazarraga, ofthe order of San Bernardo, native of Madrid,qualificator of the inquisition ; he took to an eccle-siastical life when quite a child, was collegian ofthe college of Meira, afterwards of those of Sala-manca and Alcala, professor of philosophy, moraland theological, abbot of the college of Nuestra Se-hora ' de Salamanca, a most learned theologist ;elected and consecrated bishop of Chiapa, and be-fore he left the court promoted to the bishopric ofCartagena, of which he took possession in 1640 :he thrice visited his bishopric, and after a grievousillness of 90 days duration, died in 1648.

20. Don Francisco Rodriguez de Zepeda Val-carcel, native of Zamora ; he studied grammar inthe town of Garcia, jurisprudence in Salamanca,was professor of laws in Valladolid, abbot of Ci-fuentes, and canonical doctor of the church ofSiguenza ; elected bishop of Cartagena, of whichhe took possession in 1650 ; and having governedonly 11 months, he died in the following.

21. Don Diego del Castillo y Arteaga, native ofTudela ; he studied in the university of Alcala,was collegian of Malaga, professor of arts, hav-ing substituted this title for that of theology, cano-nical master of the church of Avila; presentedto the bishopric of Cartagena in 1632, which hedeclined.

22. Don Garcia Martinez Cabezas, native of thetown of Don Benito in Estremadura ; he was pub-

lic professor of the institutes, primate of canonsin the university of Maese Rodrigo de Sevilla,w hen he was adopted as provisor by the archbishopof Lima, Don Gonzalo de Ocampo, as he passedthrough that city ; he was doctoral canon of thechurch of Charcas, afterwards school-master, trea-surer, and archdeacon, from whence he went toLima as inquisitor, and was elected bishop of Car-tagena, but died before he took possession of hisoffice, in 1653.

23. Don Antonio Sanz Lozano, native of Cava-nillas, chief collegian iti Alcala, public professorof theology, a man of learning and of acute ge-nius ; being rector of his college, he was presentedby the king to the bishopric ot Cartagena, of whichhe took possession in 1661, governed with greatskill for 20 years, and was promoted to the arch-bishopric of Santa Fe in 1681.

24. Don Antonio dc Benavides and Piedrola,native of the city of Andujar, canon of Badajoz ;elected bishop of Cartagena in 1681 : his govern-ment being very troublesome, and disturbed by acessation of religious rites, occasioned by the cir-cumstance of the nuns of Santa Clara, who wereunder the care of the religious order of St. Fran-cis, having been put under the ordinary jurisdic-tion, he was called to the court, and arrived therein 1691 ; and not being willing to accept of anyother bishopric in Spain, he died in Cadiz.

25. Don Fr. Antonio Maria Casiani, monk ofBasilio, of the university of Alcala; elected in1713.

26. Don Francisco Gomez Calleja, doctoral Ca-non of the church of Zamora; elected in 1718.

27. Don Manuel Antoniode Silva, dean of Lima,named through promotion of the former, who nothaving accepted of the same, there became a dis-pute as to which was rightly entitled to the bishop-ric of Cartagena, when it was declared by thecourt in favour of the former, who governed from1725 till 1736.

28. Don Gregorio de Molleda y Clerque, nativeof Lima, consecrated at Rome with the title ofbishop of Isauria, domestic prelate to his holiness,and made bishop of Cartagena in 1736, afterwardspromoted to the see of Truxillo in 1740.

29. Don Diego Martinez Garrido, of the orderof Santiago, opponent to the professors in the uni-versity of Salamanca; elected in 1740: he diedin 1746.

30. Don Bernardo de Arbiza y Ugarte, nativeof Cuzco, in the university of which he studiedand graduated as doctor of both laws ; he waschief auditor of the royal audience of Panama,

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in beautiful singing birds ; and in its rivers aremany sorts of fish of a fine flavour, particularly thepatah. It is not without mines of gold, and laba~deros or washing places, but these are not worked,save by a few day-labourers. In the church of themonks of San Francisco is venerated an image of themost Holy Mary, with the title of La Probezuypainted on a piece of cotton-stuff, adorned with twofine pieces of silver, the natives payitig great de-votion to this superb work, from the wonderfulthings that have been said to have been effectedthrough the prayers offered up to her of whom thisis the semblance. This city has been the nativeplace of,

Don Melchor de Salazar, governor of Choco,and founder of the city Toro.

Of the Doctor Don Francisco Martinez Bueno,presbyter and visitor of the bishopric of Popayan ;a man of great literature.

Of the Doctor Don Manuel de Castro y Rada ; amost exemplary curate.

Of the Father Joseph Vicuna, who, after havingbeen a celebrated Jesuit, became a monk in thecollege of missions for propagating the faith in Po-payan, and died whilst preaching to the AndaquiesIndians.

Of the Father Estevan de Rivas, who, after hav-ing filled the title of jurist with great credit, be-came a Franciscan monk, and died an exemplarypenitent in his convent at Cartagena.

Of the Doctor Don Francisco Felipe del Campo,professor de prima of canons in the university ofSanta Fe ; a celebrated orator.

Of the Doctor Don Geronirao de Rivas, trea-surer and dignitary of the holy church of Popayan,provisor and ecclesiastical governor of that bishop-ric.

Of the Doctor Don Joseph de Renteria, assessorof the viceroyalties of Santa Fe and Lima, honoraryoidor of the audience of Charcas : all of whomhave borne testimony to the clearness and acutenessof their understandings and excellence of their dis-positions. But for all the information on thesesubjects, we have to thank Don Manuel del Cara-po, the son of the last mentioned, who resides inthis court, and to whom the merits thus severallyapplied, unitedly belong.

The arms of this city are three imperial crownswith a sun, and its inhabitants amount to about 5000or 6000 : 25 leagues n. e. of Popayan, in 4° 46'n. lat.

Cartago, another capital city, of the provinceof Costa Rica, in the kingdom of Guatemala,situate 10 leagues from the coast of the N. sea, and17 from that of the S. in each of which it has agood port ; it was formerly rich and flourishing, onaccount of its commerce w ith Panama, Cartagena,Portobclo, and the Havanah ; but it is at the presentday reduced to a miserable village of very few in-habitants, and without any commerce. It has, be-sides the parish church, a convent of monks of St.Francis, and is in 9° 42' s. lat.

Cartago, a river of the same province and go-vernment as is the former city : it runs w. and en-ters the S.sea, in the port of La Herradura.

Cartago, a bay in the province and govern-ment of Honduras, inhabited by the infidel Mos-quitos Indians.

CARTAMA, a river of the province and govern-ment of Antioquia: it rises in the mountains ofChoco, traverses the valley to which it gives itsname, and running e. enters the Cauca.

CARTEL, a port of the coast of the provinceand government of Florida, opposite the castle ofSt. Augustin.

(CARTER, a new county in the state of Tennes-see, formed of a part of the county of Washing-ton.)

(CARTERET, a maritime county of New Beradistrict, N. Carolina, on Core and Pamlico sounds.It contains 3732 inhabitants, including 713 slaves.Beaufort is the chief town.)

Carteret, a district and jurisdiction of S. Caro-lina, on the sea-coast.

Carteret, a cape or extremity of the coast ofthe same province, and one of those which formLong bay. See Roman.

(CARTERSVILLE, a town in Powhatancounty, Virginia, on the s. side of James rivtr, 4fmiles above Richmond.)

CARUALLEDA, Nuestra Senora de, acity of the province and government of Venezuela,in the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; founded byFrancis Faxardo in 1568, and not in 1560, as ac-cording to Coleti : it has a small but insecure port.The town is also a miserable place, having sufferedmuch injury, a short time after its foundation, bythe violent disturbances caused in its neighbour-hood by the Governor Don Luis de Roxas : 80leagues e. of Coro.

CARUALLO, a settlement of the province andcaptainship of Paraiba in Brazil, situate near thesea-coast, and on the shore of the river Camara-tuba.

CARUGAMPU, a small river of the provinceand government of Paraguay ; it runs and en-ters the Parana between the rivers Capuy andParanay.

CARUJAL, PUNTA DE, a point on the coast ofthe province and government of Cartagena, called

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Olifo, and between the rivers of Great and LittleMance.]

Castors, a port on the s. coast of Nova Scotia,between the White isles and the port of Tangier.

CASTRO, a capital city of the province andgovernment of Chiloé in the kingdom of Chile;peopled by the order of Don Lope Garcia de Cas-tro, governor of Peru, who gave it his name in1560 : it lies, between two small livers, and has agood port; is inhabited by some good and opu-lent families, and enjoys a pleasant ,and healthytemperature. It is also called Chjloe, and is of aregular and beautiful form ; has, besides the pa-rish church, a convent of monks of St. Francis,and a bishop auxiliary to that of Santiago. It was.sacked by the Dutch in 1643 ; is 42 leagues s. ofthe city of Osorno, in lat. 42° 40' s.

Castro, another capital city of the province andgovernment of Esmeraldas or Atacames in the king-dom of Quito ; founded. in the valley of Fili byFrancisco Quintero, in 1586.

Castro, another settlement of the province andcvrregimknto of Chillan in the kingdom of Chile ;situate in the island of Maule, on the shore of theriver Longomilla.

Castro-Vireyna, a province and corregimientoof Peru, bounded n. w. by the province ofCanete,«. by that of Yauyos, n. e. by that of Angaraes,and partly by the jurisdiction of Huamanga andHuanta, m. by that of Vilcas Huaman, s. w. bythat of Lucanas, and s. s. w. and w. by that of\^ca. It is uneven and barren, and its inhabi-tants, on this account, amount scarcely to 6900,although it is 22 leagues in length from e. to as,and 25 in width n. to s. No mines have been dis-covered here, nor are there any other roads to itthan merely such as are opened through passes inthe snow, or where no obstruction is ofered bythe copious streams which every where precipi-tate themselves down from the mountains, andwhich are particularly large in the rainy season,which is from October to Slarch. Its productionsare wheat, maize, and potatoes; and in someglens, where the cold is not so great, fruits andcattle are extremely plentiful. Here are also lla~mas, vicunas, and huanacos, the wool of whichthey turn to some profit. This province is wa-tered by rivers, some of which descend from theprovinces of the coast of the S. sea, and othersfrom the further side of the cordillera, runningtowards the e. and entering the Maranon ; it isalso watered by the Canete, which rises from theChicha, and collects other streams in this province ;by the Pisco, which rises from a lake called.firacocha ; by the Yea, from the lake Choclo-

cocha ; and by the Calcamayo, which enters theprovince of Vilcas Huaman. In all the waters ofthis province, notwithstanding they are very abun-dant, there is a great scarcity of fish, and withoutdoubt this arises from the cold which prevailshere. This province is but thinly peopled, and itsinhabitants are poor : they do not, we have heard,amount to more than 7000 souls. It consists of sixcuracies, to which there are 29 other settlementsannexed. Its yearly reparlimiento amounted to86,400 dollars, and it paid an alcavala equal to691 dollars. The capital is of the same name ; thisis a small and poor town, situate on a lofty spot,where the cold is most intense : close to it runs ariver, which is made use of for working the millsof the silver mines ; which, although they pro-duce this metal of a good quality, they are by nomeans well stocked with it. The town has a con-vent of monks of St. Francis, and two large estatescalled Huallanto and Huallanga, in which theraare churches annexed to this curacy ; is 14 leaguesfrom Huancablica, 26 from Pisco, and 60 from

la. Long. 74° 44'. Lat. 13° 49' s. The

ements of the province

are.

Saesaquero,

Tambillo,

•Cinto,

Azavi,

Huacahuaca,

Tambo,

Pilpichaca,

Capillas,

Cargonacho,

Sangaiaico,

Santa Ana,

Andaimarca,

Acostambo,

Santiago,

Cordova,

Huachos,

Ocobamba,

Claris,

Ayamarca,

Cotas,

Ocozo,

Cocas,

Larnari,

Arma,

Pacomarca,

Huanactarabo,

Querco,

lluanac.

Laramanca,

Cadrillo,

Quisahuara,

Y anac.

Huaifara,

Tancara.

CASUHATI, a mountam of the province andgovernmemt of Buenos Ayres, on the shore of theriver Hueque Lenori.

CASURO, a river of the province and coun-try of Las Amazonas, in the Portuguese pos-sessions: it runs s. s. e. and enters the Trom-betas.

(CASWELL County, in Hillsborough district,N. Carolina, borders on Virginia, n : it contains10,096 inhabitants, of whom 2736 are slaves.Leesburg is the chief town.)

(CAT Island, or Guanahani, one of the Ba-hama islands. See St. Salvador.)

CATA, a settlement of the province and govern-

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dom ; annexed to the curacy of Pasco ; in whichis the celebrated mountain and mine of Lauri-cocha.

CAXAMARQUILLA Y COLLAOS, the territory ofthe missions which forms part of the former pro-vince, and which is a reduccion of the infidel moun-tain Indians, who have been converted by themonks of St. Francis: these Indians are main-tained by a portion paid by the kin«?’s procuratorout of the royal coffers at Lima. They dwell tothe e. of the province, and are reduced to foursettlements ; two of the Ibita, and two of the Cho-lona nation. It is now 90 years since their foun-dation, and the number of Indians may at presentamount to 2000. Those settlements are situateupon mountains covered with trees and thickwoods ; from whence the natives procure incense,cffCflo, resinous gums, oil of Maria, dragon’s blood,the reed called bejuco^ dried fish, honey, wax,monkeys, parrots, and macaws, whicli^ are thebranches of its commerce ; tliough not less so isthe coca plant, which they pack up in measures offour bushels each , and carry in abundance to differentparts, for the consumption of the whole province.The missionaries of the above order have madevarious attempts, and have spared neither painsnor labour in penetrating into the interior parts ofthe mountains ; having repeatedly discovered otherbarbarous nations, whom they would fain have re-duced to the divine knowledge of the gospel.

The aforesaid settlements are,

Jesus de Sion, San Buenaventura,

Jesus de Ochonache, Pisano.

CAXATAMBO, a province and corregimientoof Peru, bounded n. by that of Huailas, n. e. bythat of Conchuios, e. by that of Huamalies, s. e.by that of Tarma, s. by the part of Chancay calledChecras, s. e. by the low part of Chancay, and n.w. by that of Santa. It is in length 34 leagues n. e.s. w. and 32 in width n. w. s. e. ; the greaterpart of it is situate in a serrama. Its temperatureis consequently cold, except in the broken and un-even spots and in the low lands. Besides the pro-ductions peculiar to the serrama., this provinceabounds in all sorts of seeds and fruits; in allspecies of cattle, especially of the sheep kind, fromthe fleece of whicli its inhabitants manufacturemuch cloth peculiar to the country ; this beingthe principal source of its commerce. It producessome grain and cochineal, used for dyes ; and if thislatter article were cultivated, it would bring greatprofit. Amongst tlie mountains of this provincethere is one called Huilagirca of fine flint, and twomines of sulphur and alcaparrosa, articles employedin the colouring of wools, not only in this province,

VOL. I.

but in those of Huanuco, Huamalies, and Jauja:It has also mines of good yeso or gypsum. Theprincipal rivers by which it is irrigated, are twowhich rise in the same soil, and both of which enterthe S. sea, after having laved the contiguous pro-vinces ^ in former times there were fine silver mines,which are still worked, but for some reason or other,to very little profit. On the n. c. part, on some emi-nences, is a spot called Las Tres Cruces, (The ThreeCrosses), there being as many of these fixed up hereto determine its boundaries, and that of the pro-vince of Santa Huailas. Its population consists ofthe 69 following settlements : its repartimiento usedto amount to 1^0, (XX) dollars, and the akavala to1046 dollars per annum.

Caxatambo, the ca-

Cochas,

pital,

Huanchai,

Astobambas,

Gorgor,

Uicas,

Huucahori,

Mangas,

Palpay,

Ptiequian,

Chingos,

Copa,

Caxamarquili* de

Gorgorillo,

Gorgor,

Paellon,

Churin,

Chamas,

Huacho,

Nanis,

Curay,

Chiquian,

Tancur,

Huasta,

A cay a,

Acquia,

Rap;is,

Matara,

Pachangara,

Ticllos,

Palpas, distinct from

Roca,

the other,

Corpanqui,

Naba,

Llaclla,

Oyon,

Can is,

Tinta,

Caxamarquilla,

Mallay,

Rajan,

Andajes,

Hacas,

Chimba,

Carhuapampa,

Caras,

Pimachi,

Larcha,

Machaca,

Maui,

Chilcas,

Calpa,

Ocros,

Caujul,

Cheque,

Nabdn,

Congay,

Conchas,

Copa,

Ayndeo,

Caxacay,

Ambar,

Huaillacayan,

Cocharnarca,

Yaraor,

A^arocalla,

Raclla,

Huaca,

Colquios,

Quintai.

Caxatambo, a settlement and the capital of theformer province. Lat. 10° 27' s.

CAXHUACAN, S. Francisco de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Teutalpan, and al-

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C E D

DEL PUERTO, a city of the province and go-vernment of Antioquia in the Nuevo Reyno deGranada ; founded by Gaspar de Kodas, on thespot of the Matanza of Valdivia, in 1676. It haschanged its place several times, on account of thebadness of.its temperature : and, lastly, in the year1588, it was removed by Francisco Redondo tothe spot where it now stands : is one league fromthe river Cauca, on a very steep declivity, whichis also of an unhealthy temperature, althoughabounding greatly in gold mines, which are,however, but little worked. Jt is the nativeplace of,

Fr. Marcos Vetancur, provincial of St. Domingoin Santa Fe:

Fr. Lorenzo de Figueroa, of the province ofSan Francisco :

Don Andres de Vetancur, elected bishop ofLa Concepcion in Chile;

Fr. Diego de Figueroa, provincial of San Augus-tin in Santa Fe : and

Don Luis de Vetancur, precentor of Quito, in-quisitor of Lima, and bishop-elect of Popayan ;all brothers, and men of singular virtue andlearning.

CEAPA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Chilques and Marques in Peru; an-nexed to the curacy of Pampacucho.

CEBACO, a settlement of the province andalcaldia major of Matagalpa in the kingdom ofGuatemala.

CECIL, a county, being one of the ten whichcompose the colony and province of Maryland.

(Cecil, a township in Washington county,Pennsylvania.)

CECILIA, Dona, a settlement of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the kingdomof Tierra Firme ; situate on the shore of the largeriver Magdalena, opposite the lake Zapatosa, threeleagues from the town of Mompox.

CECONTEPEC, a settlement of the provinceand alcaldia major of San Salvador in the king-dom of Guatemala.

(CEDAR Point, a port of entry in Charlescounty, Maryland, on the e. side of Potowmacriver, about 12 miles below port Tobacco, and 96s. by w. of Baltimore. Its exports are chiefly to-bacco and Indian corn, and in 1794 amounted invalue to 18,593 dollars.)

(Cedar Point, a cape on the w. side of Dela-ware bay, in St. Mary’s county, Maryland.)

(Cedar Lick, a salt spring in the state of Ten-nessee, 19 miles from Nashville, four from Bigspring, and six from Little spring.)

Cedar, a river of the province and colony of

C E N

Pennsylvania, which traverses New Jersey, andenters the sea.

Cedar, another small river of the province andcolony of Delaware, which runs e. and enters thesea in the bay of its name.

Cedar, a small island of South Carolina; situatewithin the strait of Parapticoe.

Cedar, another island of the province and co-lony of Maryland, between that of Chingoteagand that of Little Matompkin.

CEDAZOS, a settlement of the head settlementand alcaldia mayor of Zapopan in Nueva Es-paña, in which dwell some Maslees, Mulattoes,and Indians, who live by cultivating seeds.

CEDROS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Paucartambo in Peru ; annexedto the curacy of Challabamba.

Cedros, another settlement in the province andgovernment of Cinaloa ; situate on the shore of theriver Mayo, on the confines of the province ofAstimuri.

Cedros, a river of New France or Canada.It runs s. e. and enters the lake Erie near themouth of the strait of Misigagues.

CEGUEHUE, a small river of the provinceand government of Quijos y Macas in the king-dom of Quito. It enters, a little way from itssource, into the Azuela.

CELAYA, a town of the intendancy of Gua-naxuato in the kingdom of Nueva Espana.Sumptuous edifices have been recently constructedhere, as also at Queretaro and Guanaxuato. Thechurch of the Carmelites of Celaya has a fineappearance ; it is adorned with Corinthian andIonic columns. Its height is 1833 metres, or 6018feet.

CELEDIN, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxamarca in Peru.

CELLACACA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Chichas and Tarija in Peru.

CENDRE, a cape or point of land of the coastof Acadia.

CENEGUANGA, a settlement of the provinceand government of Santa Marta in the kingdom ofTierra Firme; situate on the coast near the riverPiedras.

CENEGUETAS, a settlement of the provinceand government of Guayaquil in the kingdom ofQuito.

CENGUYO, San Pedro de, a settlement ofthe head settlement of Yrimbo, and alcaldia mayorof Maravatio, in the bishopric of Mechoacan,and kingdom of Nueva Espaiia. It contains 60families of Indians, and is two leagues to the n. zo.of its head settlement.

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either in the service of the United States duringthe war, or fled to them for protection. The in-digence or ill habits of these people occasioned thebreaking up of the settlement, and a better sort ofinhabitants have now taken their place. The landsare fertile, and two rivers run through it, wellstored with fish. It has 575 inhabitants, and threeslaves. By the state census of 1796, 76 of the in-habitants are electors.)

CHAMPLAIN, a lake of the same province, ofmore than 20 leagues in length, and from 10 to12 in width, abounding in excellent fish. It wasdiscovered in 1609 by a French gentleman of tliename of Champlain, who gave it his name, whichit still retains. It communicates with a smallerlake called Sacrament, and the canal passing fromone side to the other of these is extremely rapidanddangerous, from the inequality of its bottom. Atthe distance of 25 leagues to the s, are some verylofty mountains, which are covered with snow, andin which are found castors and a variety 'of ani-mals of the chase; and between these mountainsand the aforesaid lake are some beautiful levelmeadows or llanuras^ which, when first discover-ed, were well peopled with Iroquees Indians ; butthese have greatly diminished in numbers, throughthe continual wars Avith the French and English.[This lake is next in size to lake Ontario, and liese. n. €. from it, forming a part of the dividing linebetween the states of New York and Vermont. Ittook its name from a French governor, who wasdrowned in it; it was before called Corlaer’s lake.Reckoning its length from Fairhaven to St.John’s,a course nearly n. it is about 200 miles ; its breadthis from one to 18 miles, being very different in diffe-rent places ; the mean width is about five miles, andit occupies about 500,000 acres ; its depth is suf-ficient for the largest vessels. There are in it abovesixty islands of different sizes : the most consider-able are North and South Hero and Motte island.North Hero, or Grand isle, is 24 miles long, andfrom two to four wide. It receives at Ticonderogathe waters of lake George from the s. s. w. whichis said to be 100 feet higher than the waters of thislake. Half the rivers and streams which rise inVermont fall into it. There are several which cometo it from New York state, and some from Cana-da ; to which last it sends its own waters a n.course, through Sorell or Chamblee river, into theSt. Lawrence. This lake is well stored with fish,particularly salmon, salmon trout, sturgeon, andpickerel, and the land on its borders, and on thebanks of its rivers, is good. The rocks in severalplaces appear to be marked and stained with theformer surface of the lake, many feet higher than

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it has been since its discovery in 160S. The wa-ters generally rise from about the 20th of April tothe 20th of June, from four to six feet ; the great-est variation is not more than eight feet. It is sel-dom entirely shut up Avith ice until the middle ofJanuary, Between the 6th and 15th of April theice generally goes off, and it is not uncomtiAon formany square miles of it to disappear in one day.]

CHAMPLE, a large unpeopled tract of theprovince of Taraumara, and kingdom of NuevaVizcaya, in which there is a mountain aboundinggreatly in silver mines. Here is also a missionAvhicli Avas established by the regulars of the com-pany for the reduction of the natives : is 12leagues n. e. of the town of Santa Eulalia.

CHAMPOTON, a river of the province andgovernment of Jucatan. It runs into the sea nearthe lake of Tenninas.

CHAMUINA, a river of the province and go-vernment of Costarica in the kingdom of Guate-mala. It empties itself into the S. sea near the li-mits of this jurisdiction, and of that of Chiriqui inthe kingdom of Tierra Firme.

CHAMULA, a settlement of the province andalcaldía mayor of Chiapa in the kingdom of Gua-temala.

CHANAR-PUGIO, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tucumán, in the district andjurisdiction of the city of Santiago del Estero, andeight leagues from the same.

CHANCAILLO, a small port of the S. sea, inthe province and corregimiento of Chancay, tothe n. of Lima ; little frequented, from lying ex-posed, and being insecure. In lat. 12° 3' 5.

CHANCAY, a province and corregimiento ofthe kingdom of Peru ; bounded n. by that of San-ta ; n. e. and n. by that of Caxatambo ; e. by thatof Cauta; and s. by the corregimiento of Cercado.It is 27 leagues in length from n. to s. and thesame in width e. w. and has on its coast some portsand creeks not remarkable for their security. Itcomprehends in its district two territories, one ofa cold temperature toAvards the cordillera, calledDe los Checras; and another of a warm tempera-ture, lying in the valleys towards the sea, calledDe Chancay. It is irrigated by two rivers, oneon the s. side, called Pasamayo, and the otherHuama, on the n. The latter has an arched bridge,which was built in the time of the viceroy, theMarquis de Montes Claros, the buttresses of whichare two rocks, through which the river passes.On the e. and in the cold part of this province,are found the productions peculiar to the cli-mate, such as papas, ocas, and some wheat andmaize. Here are also cattle, ot the fleeces of which

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the natives make friezes. The low part, lookingupon the coast, enjoys a temperature equal inmildness to that of Lima. It is very fertile, andin the many estates which are in it maize grows ingreat quantities, and it, besides serving as food forthe labourers, and independent of that which is de-voured by the wild pigeons with which those fieldsare filled, serves to fatten numbers of pigs, which arecarried to supply the markets of Lima ; those ani-mals, one year with another, amounting to 22,000head, and producing an emolument of 300,000dollars to the proprietors of the estates. Here arealso some estates of sugar-cane, and others ofFrench beans and wheat, of which the crops wereformerly very great, and used, together with thevines, to be reckoned amongst the chief produc-tions of this country, though they have now maderoom for a more general cultivation of maize.What conduces much to render the soil fertile, iswhat the Indians call huano^ and which, in theirlanguage, signifies dung, this being brought fromsome small islands at a little distance from thecoast towards the n. It is thought to be the excre-ment of some birds called huanaes^ who have beenaccustomed to deposit it in the above places fromtime immemorial. Some of it has also been foundin various other islands of the coast of Canete,Arica, and others. Of this it is certain, that ahandful being put at the root of a plant of maize,it becomes so invigorated as to produce upwardsof 200 for one, and that not less than 90,000bushels of this valuable manure is used yearly.In the centre of the province, and upon the coast,are some fine salines^ which supply some of theneighbouring districts ; and amongst the rest, thoseof Canta, Tarma, Caxatambo, Huamalies, Hua-nuco, Conchuco, and Huailas, are the most noted.The salt is not only used in the workingof the me-tals, but for preserving the cattle from a venomousinsect called alicuya^ which preys upon their entrailsuntil it destroys them. The population consists of37 settlements ; the capital of which is the town ofArnedo or Chancay. Its repartimiento amountedto 122,000 dollars, and its alcavala to 976 dol-lars per annum.

Arnedo or Chancay,

S. Juan de Huaral,

Huaura,

Mazo,

Vegueta,

Iluacho,

Barraste,

Auccayama,

Sayan,

Tapaya,

Cauchaz or Maráz,

Yurayaco,

Picoy,

Parquin,

Yucul,

Canin,

Mollobamba,

Panun,

Turpay,

Tongos,

Chiuchiu,

Auquimarca,

Paccho,

Yguari,

Ayaranga,

Yancay,

Huacar,

Otequet,

Muca,

Huachinga,

Yacsanga,

Yunqui,

Apache,

Santa Cruz,

Acotama,

Huaycho.

Huanangui,

Chancay, the capital of the above province,founded in a beautiful and very healthy valley, ata league and a half’s distance from the river Pasa-mayo, by order of the viceroy Count of Nieva, in1563 ; who destined it for the honour of being anuniversity, at which however it never attained. Ithas a tolerable port, frequented by trading vessels,a convent of monks of the order of St. Francis, anda good hospital. It is well peopled, and its inha-bitants consist of several noble and rich families.One league from the sea, and 15 from Lima. Lat.11° 30' 5.

(CHANCEFORD, a township in York county,Pennsylvania.)

CHANCHAMAIU, a settlement of the provinceand government of Tarma in Peru, with a fort uponthe river Tapo, in the part washed by this river,called El Balseadero de Chanchamaiu. TheChunchos Indians of this province took possessionof it in 1742, and abandoned it in 1743.

Chanchamaiu, a river of the province of Caxa-marquilla. It rises in the province of Tarraa, tothe n. of the capital, runs n. and enters the largeriver Perene, in the country of the Campas In-dians.

CHANCO, CAPILLA DE, a settlement of theprovince and corregimiento of Itata in tbe king-dom of Chile ; situate near the coast.

CHANDUI, a settlement of the district of SantaElena in the province and government of Guaya-quil ; situate on the sea-shore, with a port whichis frequented by vessels only in stress ; it havingsome extensive shoals which lie just at its entrance.Here it was that the admiral’s ship of the Armadadel Sur foundered and was wrecked in 1654, as itwas dropping down to Panama, for the purpose ofdispatching the galleons under the charge of theMarquis de Villarubia ; although, through the op-portune assistance of the viceroy of Peru, Countde Salvatierra, and of tlm president of Quito, DonPedro Vazquez de Veljixco, the greater part of theproperty on board was saved. Likewise, in 1721.another ship was lost here, carrying the salaries tothe Plaza of Panama, without a single thing onboard being saved ; until, in 1728, a furious windfrom the s. w. blew ashore several fragments of the

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at that critical moment received fresh succours,that were sent from Cuzco by his brother the Mar-quis Don Francisco Pizarro, he would have fallena sacrifice, with the whole of the Spanish army, tothat undertaking : but being invigorated by thisassistance, he succeeded in routing the Indians,and in obliging them to surrender to the Spanishgovernment. In 1539 the Marquis Don Fran-cisco Pizarro, seeing the importance of making anestablishment here, resolved upon building of atown, giving a commission to Captain Pedro Au-zures to execute the same. This person actuallyput into effect the plan suggested, founding thetown in exactly the same spot in which formerlystood the settlement of Chuquisaca. Here manyof its conquerors settled and became citizens, andthey gave it the name of La Plata, or Silver, fromsome mines of this metal which are found in themountain of Porco, which lies at a small distancefrom this city, and from which the Inca Emperorswere accustomed to extract immense emolument.Notwithstanding this name it has never lost itsoriginal title, Chuquisaca, although indeed it isbadly pronounced by the Spaniards ; since the In-dians, and with great propriety, will have it Cho-quezaca, Choquechaca, or Choquisacha; all ofwhich, however pronounced, signify, the first,moun-tains of gold ; the second, cunchos of gold, orfields of brambles with yellow twigs ; and the third,bridges of gold. Although this province is exten-sive, it is composed of various others, which weshall notice under their proper heads. This keepsits present name, from being the one of all theothers the most abounding in minerals, seeds, andcattle ; as well as being the one best peopled withIndians. It is watered by many large rivers ; andthe whole of it composes an archbishopric, towhich arc suffragan the bishoprics of La Paz,Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Tucuman, Paraguay,and Buenos Ayres. It belongs to the viceroyaltyof this latter place since the time that this waserected, and that the government was entrusted tothe royal audience established in 1559. The afore-said district comprehends in its jurisdiction allthe following provinces and corregimientos :Tomino, Cochabamba,

Porco, Chayanta,

Tarija, Paria,

Lipes, Carangas,

Amparaez, Cicasica,

Oruro, Atacama ;

Pilaya,

In which are contained 188 settlements and cura-cies, in which there were in 1651 about 100,000Indians. The capital of the whole jurisdiction is

the aforesaid city of Chuquisaca or La Plata. —[Charcas joined the new government of BuenosAyres in 1810. See La Plata,]

Those who have been Presidents in the RoyalAudience of Charcas.

1. The Licentiate Pedro Ramirez de Quinones,first president, in 1559.

2. The Licentiate Juan de Matienzo, a cele-brated jurisconsult, in 1580.

3. The Licentiate Zepeda, in 1588.

4. The Licentiate Alonso Maldonado de Torres,in 1606.

5. Don Juan de Lizarazu, knight of the orderof Santiago ; he passed over to the presidency ofQuito in 1612.

6. Don Diego de Portugal, in 1614.

7. Don Alonzo Perez de Salazar, who was pre-sident of Quito, and was promoted to this, wherehe governed until the year 1620.

8. Don Juan de Caravajal y Sande, promotedin 1633.

9. Don Dionisio Perez Manrique, knight ofthe order of Santiago, collegiate in the collegeof Los Manriques de Alcala, rector of the uni-versity there, oidor of Lima, and president ofQuito, from whence he was removed to be pre-sident of this audience of Charcas in 1646 ; whence,having exercised it till 1654, he was removed tothat of Santa Fe.

10. Don Pedro Vazquez de Velasco, who pre-sided until the year 1661.

11. Don Bartolome Gonzalez de Poveda, pro-moted in 1678 ; he was made archbishop of theholy church of Charcas, remaining in the presi-dency until 1688.

12. Don Diego Mesia, native of Lima, oidor ofits royal audience, and formerly of that of Quito ;he was promoted to the presidency of Charcas in1688.

13. Don Jorge Manrique de Lara, who wasoidor of Panama, afterwards of Charcas, as alsopresident.

14. Don Gabriel Antonio Matienzo, president in1723.

15. Don Francisco de Herboso, who was ap-pointed in 1725, and presided until 1732.

16. Don Agustin de Jauregui, knight of theorder of Santiago, and native of Lima.

17. Don Juan Francisco Pestana, adjutant-major of the regiment of Spanish guards ; he wasnominated in 1752, and presided until 1769.

18. Don Ambrosio de Benavides, who enteredin the above year, and presided until 1777.

19. Don Agustin de Pinedo, who succeededthe former, and governed until 1782.

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11. Don Juan Zapata y Sandoval, nativeof Mexico, of the order of St. Augustin ; he cameto Spain, was regent of the college of San Gabrielde Valladolid, and elected bishop of Chiapa in1612 ; then promoted to the archbishopric of Gua-temala in' 1622.

12. Don Bernardino de Salazar y Frias, nativeof Burgos, canon of Jaen, .collegiate in the collegeof San Antonio de Portaceli de Siguenza ; pre-sented to the bishopric in 1622 : he died in 1623.

13. Don Alonzo Munoz, dean of the holy churchof Mexico, professor of theology ; he died beforehe was consecrated.

14. Don Agustin Ugarte de Saravia, elected in1628 ; he was promoted in 1630 to the arch-bishopric of Guatemala.

15. Don Fray Marcos Ramirez de Prado, of theorder of St. Francis, native of Madrid ; he studiedin Salamanca arts and theology with great credit,was guardian of the convent of Lucena, vice-com-missary general of the Indies, and guardian of theconvent of Granada, when he was elected bishopof Chiapa in 1632 ; he entered its church in 1635,and was promoted to that of Mechoacan in 1639.

16. Don Fray Christoval de Lazarraga, a monkof the order of St. Bernard, native of Madrid, wasmaster and professor in Salamanca, abbot of themonastery of that city, and qualificator of the in-quisition ; he was presented to the bishopric ofChiapa in 1639, and promoted to that of Carta-gena of the Indies in 1641.

17. Don Fray Domingo de Villaescusa, a monkof the order of St. Jerome, collegian in the col-lege of San Lorenzo el Real, prior of the monas-tery of Espeja, and of those of Parral de Segovia,of San Geronimo de Guisando of Madrid, visitorof the two Castillas, and general of his order ; waspresented to the bishopric of Chiapa in 1641, go-verned until 165 1 , when he was promoted to thechurch of Y ucatan.

18. Don JFrqy Francisco Nunez de la Vega, amonk of the order of St. Dominic.

19. Don Christoval Bernardo de Quiros, nativeof Tordelaguna, canon of the churches of Are-quipa, Quito, and of Lima, pro visor and vicar-general of the archbishopric, and judge of the in-quisition ; he was elected in 1660, and was pro-moted to the archbishopric of Popayan in 1670.

20. Don Manuel Fernandez de Santa Cruz ySahagun, a native of Palencia in Castilla deCuenca, in the university of Salamanca, first canonof Segovia, was elected in 1672, and before he ar-rived was promoted to Guadalaxara.

21. Don

22. Don

23. Don J uan Bautista Alvarez de Toledo, na-

tive of the town of San Salvador, in the provinceof G uatemala, of the religious order of St. Francis,professor in his religion, and prelate of many con-vents ; he was elected in 1708, and promoted to thearchbishopric of Guatemala in 1714. ,

24. Don

25. Don Fray Joseph Cubero Ramirez de Arel-lano, a monk of the order of Nuestra Senora de laMerced ; elected in 1734, governed 19 years, until1753, when he died.

26. Don Fray Joseph Vidal de Montezuma, ofthe order of Nuestra Senora de la Merced, a nativeof Mexico ; elected in 1753, governed till 1767,when he died.

27. Don Miguel de Cilieza y Velasco ;• electedin the above year, governed until 1768, when hedied.

28. Don Fray Lucas Ramirez, of the order ofSt. Francis ; he was promoted to the archbishopricof Santa Fe in 1769.

29. Don Fray Juan Manuel de Vargas y Ri-vera, a native of Lima, monk of the order of Nues-tra Senora de la Merced ; elected in the afore-said year of 1769, governed until 1774, when hedied.

30. Don Antonio Caballero y Gongora, untilthe following year of 1775, when he was promotedto the church of Yucatan.

31. Don Francisco Polanco, until 1785, whenhe died ; and,

32. Don Joseph Martinez Palomino Lopez deLerena, elected in 1786.

Chiapa, with the appellation of Mota, a settle-ment of the alcaldia mayor of Xilotepec in NucvaEspana. It contains 960 families of Otomies In-dians, and is seven leagues to the n. w. of its ca-pital.

CHIAPANTONGO, a settlement and headsettlement of the district of the alcaldia mayor ofXilotepec in Nueva Espana ; annexed to thecuracy of its capital, from whence it lies twoleaffues to the n. It contains 102 familes of In-dians.

CHIAPAS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Cinaloa.

CHIAPILLA, a settlement of the province andalcaldia mayor of Chiapa, and kingdom of Guate-mala, in the district of its capital.

CHIARA, a settlement of the province and bi-shopric of Huamanga in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of the parish of Santa Maria Magdalena inthat city, from whence it is three leagues distant.

CHIAUTLA, S. Andres De, a settlement andhead settlement of the alcaldia mayor of Tezcoco

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raent and head settlenient of the district of the al-caldia mayor of Tepozcolula in the same kingdom.It is of a mild temperature, and contains a conventof the religious order of St. Domingo, and 128 fa-milies of Indians, who occupy themselves in thetrade of cochineal, as likewise of certain seedswhich they sow in ihe ranchos. Four leagues tothe n. by s. of its capital.

Chilapa, San Pedro de, another, of the headsettlement of the district of Huitepec, and alcaldiamayor of Ixquintepec, in the same kingdom. Itcontains 30 families of Indians, and is five leaguesto the n. with a slight inclination to the e. of itscapital.

CHILAQUE, a settlement of the head settle-ment of the district of Olintla, and alcaldia mayorof Zacatlan, in Nueva España. It is situate in adelightful glen surrounded by rocks, and is water-ed by various streams, being distant five leaguesfrom its head settlement.

CHILATECA, S. JUAN DE, a settlement ofthe head settlement of the district of Cuilapa, andalcaldia mayor of Quatro Villas, in Nueva Es-pana. It contains 52 families of Indians, whotrade in cochineal, seeds, and fruits, and collectcoal and timber, all of which form branches oftheir commerce. Five leagues to the s.e. of itshead settlement.

CHILCA, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Canete in Peru, with a small butsafe and convenient port. It abounds in saltpetre,which its natives carry to Lima for the purpose ofmaking gunpowder, on which account they arefor the most part muleteers or carriers. In itsvicinity are the remains of some magnificent build-ings which belonged to the Incas of Peru. Thename of Chilca is given by the Indians of the samekingdom, as also by those of the kingdom of Quito,to a small tree or shrub which is a native of hotclimates, and which, when burnt to ashes, isoften used as lye for the use of the sugar en-gines.

Chi DC A, a beautiful and extensive valley ofthis province, which, although it be not irrigatedby any river, stream, or fountain, by which itmight be fertilized, produces an abundant harvest ofmaize. The seed of this is accustomed to beburied in the ground with heads of pilchards, anabundance of which fish is found upon the coast;and thus, by the moisture arising from this prac-tice, and by the morning dews, the soil becomessuflaciently moistened to produce a very fair crop.The same method is observed, and the same effectproduced, with regard to other fruits and herbs ;but for drinking and culinary uses, the little

water that is procured is drawn from wells. Lat.12° 3P 5. Long. 76° 35' w.

CHILCAIMARCA, a settlement of the pro-vince and corregimiento of Condesuyos de Are-quipa in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of An-dahua.

CHILCAIO, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Lucimas in Peru ; annexed to thecuracy of Querobamba.

CHILCAS, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru ; annexed tothe curacy of Hacas.

Chilcas, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huanta in the same kingdom ;annexed to the curacy of Tambos.

CHILCHAIOTLA, a settlement of the headsettlement of the district and alcaldia mayor ofZochicoatlan in Nueva España; situate on theside of a hill. It is of a hot temperature, contains26 families of Indians, and is 11 leagues to the n.of its capital.

CHILCHOIAQUE, a settlement of the headsettlement of TIacolula, and alcaldia mayor ofXalapa, in Nueva Espana ; situate in a very ex-tensive glen, surrounded by heights which beginin the neighbourhood of Xilotepec, and run some-what more than a league in length. The popula-tion is very scanty, and the temperature bad ;indeed, out of the many families which formerlyinhabited it, 19 only are remaining ; these employthemselves in the rancherias^ agriculture beingindispensably necessary to their maintenance,owing to the barrenness of the territory of the dis-trict. At the distance of a league to the n. of Xa-lapa, and on the side of the royal road leading to^^exico, is the great mill of Lucas Martin. Herethe lands are fertilized by the large river Cerdeilo ;by the waters of which also other settlements arcsupplied, as likewise some of ihe ranchos^ whereinemployment is found for upwards of SO familiesof Spaniards, some Mustees^ and many Indians.Four leagues to the s. w. of its head settlement.

GHILCHOTA, the alcaldia mayor and juris-diction of the province and bishopric of Mecho-aedn. It is very mean, and reduced to a few smallsettlements, which lie so nigh together, that theirsituations are pointed out to tlie traveller by crossesstuck up in the roads. Its population consists of470 families of Tarascos Indians, and about 300 ofSpaniards, Mulattoes, and Mustees\ who are,for the most part, scattered in the agriculturalestates of its district, where, from the fertility of thesoil, wheat, maize, and other seeds, are cultivatedin abundance. The country is agreeable, and wellstocked with every kind of fruit trees. The capi-

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smaller size, are more delicate, and of superiorflavour to those caught in Newfoundland. Am-bergris is also found upon the coast. The moun-tains abound in trees of the most beautiful kind,laurels, oaks of four sorts, the carob-tree, thewood of M'hich is extremely hard, reulis, cinna-mon-trees, Cyprus, sandal, paraguas, hazel-nut,ivall-nut, volos, and alerces, which are a kind ofcedar, of which they make planks in great num-bers to carry to Lima and other parts. Many ofthese trees are green the whole year round, fromthe moisture and shelter they derive from the cor-dillera, which contains in its bowels much fire, asappears from the volcanoes found upon it, andwhich are 12 in number, without counting manyothers, even as far as the straits of Magellan. Al-though these mountains and woods are so immense,beasts of a savage kind are rarely to be found, ex-cepting such, now and then, as a tiger or leopard ;but there are great numbers of deer, stags, vicunas,and Imanacos, which served as food for the In-dians; as likewise of birds, as ducks, vandurrias,swans, herons, kites, doves, piuguenes, tarlales,parrots, hawks, falcons, goshawks ; and many sing-ing birds, as goldfinches, larks, starlings, diucas,trillies, and many others. Its present vegetableproductions are wheat, barley, Indian wheat, grainsof different kinds, oil of the finest olives, excellentwines, much esteemed in Peru; all kinds of suc-culent fruits, oranges, lemons, innumerable sorts ofapples, and every kind of garden herb. Flax andliemp is cultivated here, from which they makerigging for vessels trading to the S. seas ; and thiscould be supplied in a proportion equal to any de-mand. This kingdom keeps up a considerabletrade with Peru ; for, one year with the other, itsends to Lima from 150 to 180,000 bushels ofwheat, 120,000 quintals of grease, much wine,and other productions, as almonds, nuts, lentils,a sort of wild marjoram and bastard saffron ; andtakes in exchange sugar and cloths of the country.It derives also great emolument from large herdsof the cow kind, from flocks of sheep and goats,of the skins of which they procure fine tanned lea-ther, leathern jackets, sharaois leather, and soles ofshoes : from these animals is also procured muchfat or tallow. Flere are numerous breeds of mostbeautiful horse.s, and some of these, from excellingall the others in the swiftness of their paces, arecalled aguiliUias. It also abounds in mules, andit would still more so, if, as formerly, they werein request at Peru, where their skins were usedinstead of fine cloths and carpets. Baizes arc stillmade ; as likewise some sorts of small cord, coarse€tutfs, and many kinds of sackcloth, which is the

common vesture, and consists of a square garment,with an opening to admit the head ; but manylooms have been lost through a want of Indians inthe manufactories. The greater part of thesepeople still prefer their original uncivilized state,depending upon the natural fruits of the earth forfor their food ; for, besides the productions aboveenumerated, they used to gather, without thetrouble of cultivation, all sorts of delicious fruits,such as pines, though different from those of Eu-rope; and to make excellent chiclia of the murtilla.Indeed the luxuriance and abundance of delicateflowers, and aromatic and medicinal herbs, is al-most incredible ; of the last the following are themost esteemed for their virtue, viz. the cancliala-gua, quinchemali, alhahaquilla, and culen. Itcontains many mines of the richest gold, silver,copper, lead, tin, quick-silver, brimstone, load-stone, and coal : yielding immense riches, whichthe Indians never appreciated, nor even gavethemselves the least trouble about, until the con-quest of the Incas, who began to work them ;sending portions of gold to Cuzco for the orna-ment of the temples and palaces, rather by way ofgift than of tribute. The incursions and rebel-lions of the Indians, principally of the Arauca-nians, who, in the year J599, took and destroyedsix cities, viz. Valdivia, Imperial, Angol, SantaCrux, Chilian, and Concepcion, is the cause whythe population is in many places not large, andthat it consists of poor people, living in smallcommunities ; the fact being, that they are alwaj^sliving in constant dread of a surprise from the In-dians; not but that on the confines there are gar-risons, well defended by Spanish troops, with ne-cessary provisions of artillery, victuals, and am-munition. The war which has from the begin-ning been sustained by the Spaniards against thesemost ferocious Indians, has tended greatly to re-duce the numbers of the former ; some havingbeen killed on the spot, and others doomed to beslaves to their indignant conquerors. Indeed,when it was found that arms were of no availagainst them, some missionaries of the society ofthe Jesuits were sent among them, in the year1612, in order to propagate the gospel ; when theFathers Horacio Vechi and Martin de Arandasuffered martyrdom at their hands: after which atreaty of peace was made by the Governor Mar-quis de Baides, A. D. 1640, and which has sincebeen renewed yearly ; their deputies coming re-gularly to the capital to receive the presents fromthe king of Spain. They have, notwithstanding,at different times broken the treaty, making in-cursions into the Spanish towns, and their manner4

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of declaring war is by sending from town to townan arrow clenched in a dead man’s hand,which they call comocatoria; and this they didin the year 1723, making terrible havoc andslaughter. This kingdom is evidently, fromwhat has been asserted, the most fertile, abun-dant, rich, and delightful region of all America ;to which Nature has granted, in profusion, allthat she has given to others, either with a sparinghand, or at too high a price. The people areliealthy and robust. The wind which generallyprevails is thes. w. and the Puelche, which comesfrom the cordillera, is somewhat troublesome. [ThePuelche wind takes its name from some Indians socalled, and from whose country it blows.] Chileis divided into two bishoprics, suffragan to thearchbishopric of Lima ; and these are of Santiagoand La Concepcion. It is governed by a president,governor, and captain-general, which title wasfirst possessed by Doii Melchor Bravo de Saravia,and its government is divided into 18 provincesor districts, which are,

Cuyo,

Copiapo,

l-a Serena or CoquimbiQuillota,

Aconcagua,

Santiago,

Melipilla,

Rancagua,

Colchagua,

And the islands of Juatal is Santiago.

Catalogue of the barbarous Nations and principalPlaces in the kingdom of Chile.

Nations. Mountains.

Chacao,

Chilian,

Concepcion.

Confines,

Copiapo,

Coquimbo or La Se-

rena,

Imperial,

Loyola,

Mendoza,

Osorno,

Santiago,

San Juan de la Fron-tera,

San Luis de Loyola,Valdivia,

Valparaiso,

Villarica.

Forts.

Arauco,

Los Angeles,

Eyou,

Guasco,

Y tata,

Labapi,

Laxa,

Lebo,

Ligua,

Liman,

Limathi,

Longatoma,

Mapocho,

Mataquito,

Maule,

Maypo,

Nubbe or Nuble,Pereroa,

Poangue,

Queule,

Ralemo,

Salado,

Teno,

Maule,

Tucapel,

Tongoy,

Ytata,

Yumbel.

Topocalma,

Chilian,

Promontories.

Turuyan,

Estancia del Rey or

Ballena,

Uten.

Rede,

Carnero,

Ports.

Puchacay,

Cauten,

Castro,

La Concepcion,

Changui,

Cauten,

Valdivia,

Feliz,

Cerrito Verde,

Chiloe,

Villiva,

Chacao,

Fernandez. The capi-

Rivers.

Andalie,

Cumberland,

Guasco,

Antallis,

Araucanos,

Cauquis,

Chauracabis,

Guarpes,

JUncos,

Pequenches,

Pevinges,

Pincus,

Poyas,

P niches,Yanacunas.

Lakes.

Aguas Calientes,Guanacache,Mallabauquen,Padaguel,

Puren.

Antojo,

Chilian, vole.

Chuapa, vole.

Estancia de Rey, gold,Larapangui, silver,Ligua, vole.

Llaon, gold,Llupangui, gold,Notuco, vole.

Payen, lead,

Peteroa, vole.

Petorca, gold,Quillacoya, gold,Sinn, vole.

Yapel, gold.

Cities.

Calbuco,

Canetej

Castro,

Arancagua,

Biobio,

Buono,

Cachapoal,

Cauquenes,

Cauren,

Cauten,

Chavin,

Civapa,

Claro,

Copiapo,

Curarahua,

De Lora,

De la Sal,

Paracas,

Quillin,

Talcaguano,

Tome,

Tongoy.

Isles.

Chiloe,

Clones,

Farallones,

Fernandez,

Guaiteca,

Moche,

Quiriquina,

Santa Maria.

Catalogue of the Presidents, Governors, and Cap-tains-general of the Kingdom of Chile.

1. The Adelantado Pedro de Valdivia, conquer-or of the kingdom; he served much, and withgreat valour, in the conquest of Peru, was a colo-nel of foot under Francis Pizarro, entered in theyear 1537, founded the first towns, and governeduntil the year 1551 ; he was made prisoner, fight-

2

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[ing valiantly in a battle against the Araucanos, andkilled.

2. Don Garcia Hurtado de Mendoza, son of theMarquis de Cahete, who was viceroy in Peru ;immediately that he received new's of the death ofValdivia, lie nominated him as his successor, andhe returned to Peru as soon as he had seen himconfirmed in the government, and his title sanc-tioned by the king.

3. Francisco de Villagra, a noble captain, who,in pursuing his conquests, was also killed by theIndians in battle ; provisionally succeeded by hisuncle, until a governor w'as appointed by the king.

4. The Adelantado Rodrigo de Quiroga, whogoverned peaceably until his death, leaving thegovernment to the charge of his father-in-law.

5. The Brigadier Martin Ruiz de Gamboa, untilhe was nominated by tlie king.

G. The Doctor Melchor Bravo de Saravia, withthe title of first president, until his death.

7. Don Alonso de Sotomayor, Marquis deVilla-hermosa, appointed in the year 1584 : having ma-nifested his valour, talent, and address, in the go-vernment, which he held with much credit, andwith great advantage, against the Indians, untilthe year 1592, when arrived,

8. Don Martin Garcia Onez y Loyola, knightof the order of Calatrava ; w'as killed by the In-dians succouring the fortof Puren, which was be-sieged in the year 1599.

9. The Licentiate Pedro de Vizcarra, who ex-ercised the employ of lieutenant-general of thekingdom ; he was appointed to it when theformer was killed, until the viceroyalty of Peruwas given to,

10. The Captain Francisco de Quinones, whoemployed himself in restraining the Araucanosfrom their rebellion, until his death ; afterwardswas nominated for the viceroyalty of Peru.

11. Captain Alonzo Garcia Remon, an officerof much credit, and skilled in the country and thewar with the Indians ; being colonel of foot ofDon Alonzo Sotomayor, began to govern, ap-pointed by the viceroy of Lima, until arrived,sanctioned and duly elected by the king,

12. Don Alonso de la Rivera, Avho was servingin Flanders, and was sent to Chile, where, havingmarried contrary to the prohibition of his Majesty,he was deprived of his office, and in his place wasappointed,

13. The aforesaid Don Alonso Garcia Remon,whose speedy death did not suffer him long toreign, and he was succeeded by,

14. The Doctor Don Luis Merlo de la Fuente,chief auditor of the royal audience, who, through

VOL, I.

the death of his antecessor, governed also but ashort time before the arrival of,

15. Don Juan de Xaraquemada, native of (ka-naria, who was in Lima covered with honours ac-quired in the Avar of Chile, when he was nomi-nated governor by the viceroy of Peru, Marquisde Montes Claros.

16. Don Alonso de la Rivera again, being atthat time governor of Tucuman ; he Avas sepa-rated from this government, and Avas sent by theking, at the instance of the missionaries, to re-duce that kingdom by the experience he possessed,and gave proofs of his great ability in peace andAvar until his death.

17. The Licentiate Fernando Talaverano, mostancient oidor of the audience, Avas charged waththe government through this quality, and by theparticular recommendation of his antecessor, un-til the viceroy of Peru, Prince of Esquilache, re-gularly appointed,

18. Don Lope de Ulloa, ayIio, in the exercise ofthis office, Avas confirmed in it by his Majesty un-til his death, when the government was taken

up by,

19. Don ChristoA'al de la Cerda Sotomayor, na-tive of Mexico, chief auditor of the real audencia,whom, notAvithstanding his excellent qualities, andthe celebrity of his government, the viceroy ofPeru soon set aside, in favour of,

20. Don Pedro Sorez de Ulloa y Lemos, knightof the order of Alcantara, Avho in a short timeAvas confirmed in the government by the king, ex-ercising it until his death, and leaving it to thecare of his brother-in-laAV,

21. Don Francisco de Alva y Noruena, Avhoheld it a short time, from the viceroy Jiaving, ac-cording to custom, nominated a successor; andthis Avas,

22. Don Luis Fernandez de Cordoba y Arce,Senor del Carpio, Veinte y Quatro de Cordoba,who, although he was not confirmed by the king,maintained it some years, in consideration of thejudgment and skill he manifested, until, in theyear 1633, he Avas supplanted by,

23. Don Francisco Laso de la Vega, knight ofthe order of Santiago, a man of high endowmentsand splendid fortunes in the Avar of the Indians ;he finished his reign, delivering it to his suc-cessor,

24. Don Francisco de Zuniga, Marquis de Bay-des. Count del Pedroso, entered into the posses-sion of the government in the year 1640 ; it Avashe who established and secured the peace Avith theIndians by means of the missionaries of the so-ciety of the Jesuits ; with which glory he

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left the government, in the year 1655, to the suc-cessor,

25. Don Martin de Muxica, knight of the orderof Santiago, a renowned officer, and one who hadgained much renown in the armies of Ital}^ andFlanders.

26. Don Pedro Porter de Casanate, A. D.1659.

27. Don Francisco Meneses Bravo de Sarabia,who led from Spain a body of troops, in order tosubdue the Indians; this he accomplished; andin the year 1664 rebuilt the cities which had beendestroyed in 1599 : his government lasted untilthe year 1668, when he was deposed by the vice-roy of Peru.

28. Don Angel Peredo, knight of the order ofSantiago ; he was appointed as an intermediategovernor upon the deposition of his antecessor,and governed during the following year, 1669.

» 29. Don Juan Enriquez, native of Lima, knightof the order of Santiago, governed until the year1677.

30. Don

31. Don

32. Don

33. Don Juan Andres de Ustariz, native of Se-villa, until the year 1715, when was elected,

34. Don Gabriel Cano dc Aponte, brigadier-general of the royal armies, in whose time theAraucanos again declared war, when he obligedthem to renew the peace ; died A.D. 1728.

35. Don Juan de Salamanca, colonel of the mi-litia of that kingdom ; he was an intermediate go-vernor, and at his death,

36. Don Joseph de Santiago Concha, Marquisde Casa Concha, kinght of the order of Calatrava,chief auditor of the royal audience of Lima, nomi-nated by the viceroy.

37. Don Alonso de Obando, Marquis de Obatido,vice-admiral of the royal armada ; appointed bythe viceroy, the Marquis de Villa Garcia, as inter-mediate successor, until the year 1736.

38. Don Joseph Manso de Velasco, Count otSnperunda, knight of the order of Santiago ; hewas at that time captain of the grenadiers of theregiment of Spanish guards, and ranked as briga-dier; well recommended by his valour and ex-ploits, when he was appointed to this presidencyin the aforesaid year ; he governed until the year1746, when he was promoted to the viceroyalty ofPeru.

39. Don Domingo Ortiz de Rozas, knight ofthe order of Santiago, was at that time governor ofBuenos Ayres, and Avas elected to this presidencyin the aforesaid year ; he founded several toAvns,

on which account the king gave him the title ofConde de Poblaciones ; governed until the year1754, when returning to Spain, he died.

40 Don Manuel Arnat y J unient, knight of theorder of San Juan, colonel of the regiment of dra-goons of Sagunto, of the rank of brigadier, ap-pointed to this presidency ; which he filled untilthe year 1761, when he was promoted to the vice-royahy of Peru.

41. Don Mateo de Toro de Zambrano y Urueta,appointed as intermediate successor by the former,upon his departure from Lima, until the arrival ofthe right successor,

42. Don Antonio Guill, formerly colonel of theregiment of infantry of Guadalaxara, and thenranked as brigadier, being governor and captain-general of the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; promotedto this presidency in the aforesaid year, 1761, andexercised it until his death, in 1768.

43. Don Mateo de Toro Zambrano y Urueta, thesecond time of his being nominated as intermediatesuccessor by the audience in the vacancy, untilwas nominated by the viceroy of Peru,

44. Don Francisco Xavier de Morales, knightof the order of Santiago, brigadier of the royalarmies, who being captain of the grenadiers of theregiment of the royal Spanish guards, was madegeneral of the militia in Peru, and Avas nominatedas intermediate successor by the viceroy to thispresidency, Avhich he enjoyed till his death in theyear 1772.

45. The aforesaid Don Mateo de Toro Zam-brano y Urueta, then Count of La Conquista, knightof the order of Santiago, and lieutenant-colonel ofthe royal armies, nominated for the third time bythe royal audience during the vacancy, until ar-rived the right successor,

46. Don Agustin de Jauregui, knight of theorder of Santiago, brigadier of the royal armies,Avho had been colonel of the regiment of dragoonsof Sagunto ; Avas appointed to this presidencyA.D. 1773, and enjoyed it until 1782, Avhen heAvas promoted to the viceroyalty of Peru.

47. Don Ambrosio de Benavides, brigadier ofthe royal armies, was nominated in the same year,1782.

[INDEX TO THE ADDITIONAL HISTORY ANDINFORMATION RESPECTING CHILE.

Chap. 1. Origin and language of the Chilians.— Conquest o f the Peruvians^ and state of Chilebefore the arrival of the Spaniards.— What werethen its political establishments^ government, andarts.

1. Language.— 2. Original state.— 3. Divided intofree and subjugated.— Agricidture.—b. Civi-

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[lized state.— ‘6 The metals.— 1 . Substitute forwriting.

Chap. II. Fi rst expedition of the Spaniards inChile.— Encounters with the natives., with varioussuccess, until the alliance formed between theSpaniards and Promaucians.

1. Almagvo marches against Chile. —2. Road fromPeru to Chile.-— o. Kindhj received at Copiapo.—4. First European blood shed.— 5. Battle withthe Promaucians.— Q. Expedition abandoned,and why.—l. Valdivia marches against Chile.—8. Province of St. Ja go describe'd.—'il. The ca-pital founded.— \0. Steady enmitnj of the Mapo-chinians.—l\. The mine of Quillota.— 12. The

compassionate ulmena. 13. Recruits fom

Peru, under Monroy.—-\t^. Stratagem of theQuillotanes.-—\5. Serena founded.— \Q. Pro-maucian cdlies.—ll . Valdivia sets sail for Peru,and returns with men and supplies.— \8. Con-cepcion founded.

Chap. III. Of the character and manners of theAraucanians .

1. Local situation.— 2. Character .-—3. Dress.—

4. Dwellings.— b. Division of the Araucanian

state.— 6. Its political form.-— 7. Civil institu-tions.— 8. Military system.— 3. Their arms,and mode of making av/r.— -10. Division of thespoil.— 1\. Sacrifice after the war. — \2. Con-gress of peace.— 13. System of religion.—!^.Funeral ceremonies.— \b. Division of time.—16. Astronomical ideas.— \7. Measures.— \8.Phetoric.— \9. Poetry . — 20. Medical skill.— -21. Commerce.— 22. National pride.— 23. Kind-ness towards each other.— 2^. Mode of saluta-tion. 25. Proper names.-— 20. Domestic em-

ployments. — 27. Food. -— 28. Music, and otherdiversions.

Chap. IV. The wars of the Araucanians with theSpaniards, and concomitant events.

1. The Toqui Aillavila.—2. The Toqui Lincoyan.—3. Imperial founded.---!^. Villariqa founded. —

5. The Cunches.—G. Valdivia founded.-— 7 . For-tresses of Fiiren, Tucapel, and Araiico built.—8. City of the Frontiers founded. -— 9. Threeprincipal military offices instituted at Concepcion.

— \Q. The Toqui Caupolican. 11. Valdivia

slain.— Lautaro appointed lieutenant-general,—12. The mountain Mariguenu. 13. The Go-

vernor Villa gr an. —1^. Conception destroyed.—15. The small-pox appears.-— \0. Decision ofthe audience of Lima 1 'especting the governors.-—17. Concepcion rebuilt, and destroyed by Lau-taro.— Lautaro arrives at Santiago.— 19.Death of Lautaro.— 20. Caupolican raises thesiege of Imperial.— 21. The Governor Don Gar-

cia Hurtado de Mendoza.— 22. Caupolican takenprisoner and impaled.— 23. Cahete founded.—24. The Cur.ches, their curious embassy and stra-tagem.— 25. Archipelago of Chiloe discovered.-—26. City of Osorno founded.— 27 . Caupolican theSecond.— 28. The Guarpes subjected.— 29. St.Juan and Mendoza founded,— 30. Villagran re-instated. — 31. The province of Tucuman re-stored, afterwards retaken. 32. Cahete de-stroyed.— 33. Pedro Villagran. ---34. The To-qui Pcdllataru,— 35. Archipelago of Chiloe sub-jected; description of the same ; its inhabitants,fc.-—36. The court of audience established.—

37. Suppression of the tribunal of audience.— -

38. Description of the Pehuenches .—39 . De-scription of the Chiquillanians . — 40. Landingand defeat of the English.— ^1. Nature oj thewar in anno 1589. — 42. Independence restored.--43. Expedition of the Dutch.-— All theSpanish settlements destroyed.— 1^5. Court of au-dience re-established.— i6. Ineffectual efforts ofPhilip III. to establish a lasting peace. — VI .Second expedition of the Dutch.— F8. Secondexpedition o f the English.— ^9. Peace at lengthconcluded.-— 50. Last expedition of the Dutch.— 51. Dreadful earthquake. — 52. Commercewith the French.— 53. How the Pehuenches be-came inimical to the Spaniards.— 51. Peace re-stored.

Chap. V. Present state of Chile.

1. Civil government.— 2. Military force.— -3. Ec-clesiastical government. 4. The cities anddwellings.— 5. Population.— 6. Chilian Creoles.—7. ^ate of arts and sciences.— 8. The pea-santry .—9. Dress, S;c.— 10. Diseases; small-pox, how cured.— 11 . Manners, moral and phy-sical. 12. Internal and external commerce,

mines, imports, and exports. — 13. Natural divi-sions.— U. Poliiiced divisions.— 15. Climate.— -16. Of rain. — 11 . Winds.— -IS. Meteors.— 19.Volcanoes. — 20. Earthquakes. —21. Some de-tail of productions.— 22. Present revolution.

Chap. I.

Origin and language of the Chilians .—Conquestof the Peruvians, and state of Chile before thearrival of the Spaniards.-— What was then itspolitical establishments, government, and arts.Of the origin and huiguage of the Chilians, notraces are to be found further back than the middleof the 15th century, -which was the time when (hePeruvians first began (heir conquests in this de-lightful country. It is the general opinion thatAmerica was settled from the n. e. part of Asia,but the opinion entertained by the Chilians is, (hat '3 E 2

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[tlieir country was peopled from the w. Howeverdiis may be, that it was originally peopled by onenation appears possible, as all the Aborigines in-habiting it, however independent of each other,speak the same language, and have a similar ap-pearance.

1. Language. — Their language is copious, fullof harmony and richness. Each verb, either de-rivatively or conjunctively, becomes the root ofnumerous other verbs and nouns, as well adjectivesas substantives, which in their turn reproduceothers, which are secondary, modifying themselvesin an hundred different ways. There is no part ofspeech from which an appropriate verb cannot beformed by the addition of a final en. Even fromthe most simple particles vmrious verbs are derived,that giv'e great precision and strength to conversa-tion : but what is truly surprising in this languageis, that it contains no irregular verb or noun.Every thing in it may be said to be regulated witha geometrical precision, and displays much artwith great simplicity : it contains words, appa-rently of Greek and Latin derivation, and of asimilar signification in both languages. But whatis most remarkable, it differs from every other Ame-rican language, not less in its w'ords than in itsconstruction ; and with all its richness and har-mony, its theory is so easy that it may be readilylearned in a few days. Several grammars of thislanguage are to be met with, but that of Febres,printed at Lima in 1765, is particularly to be re-commended for its method and clearness. One ar-gument further in favour of the simplicity of thistongue, is the circumstance of its having main-tained itself in its pure state, and of its not liavingsunk into an unintelligible unconnected jargon,■when it is considered that the Chilians, to the afore-mentioned period, had no ideas of writing, and thattheir traditionary accounts were so crude and im-perfect, as to afford not the least degree of informa-tion to the inquisitive mind. Hence it follows thatthe first accounts of them are contained in the Peru-vian annals ; that nation, as it was more civilized,being more careful to preserve the memory of re-markable events.

2. Original state . — When the Inca Yupanquibegan to attempt the conquest of Chile, its inhabi-tants were supposed to be numerous. They weredivided into 15 tribes or communities, independentof each other, but subject to certain chiets calledulmenes. These tribes, beginning at the n. andproceeding to the s. were called Copiapins, Co-quimbanes, Quillotanes, Mapochiniaus, Promau-cians. Cures, Cauques, Penconcs, Aruucanians,Clinches, Chilotes, Chiquilanians, Pehuenches, Pu-

elches, and Huilliches. Of these were subjugatedto the Peruvian government, more by persuasionthan force, the Copiapins, Coquimbanes, Quillo-tanes, and Mapochinians ; but the valour of thePromaucians put a stop to the success of the armsof the Inca, or rather to Sinchiruca, (a prince ofthe blood royal), to whom was entrusted the com-mand of the expedition : for these brave people,naturally addicted to pleasures and diversions, andAvhose very name signifies the free dancers.^ op-posed the Peruvian army with the most heroicvalour, and entirely defeated it in a battle which,according to Garcilasso the historian, was conti-nued for three days in succession.

S. Divided into free and subjugated. — ThusChile became divided into two parts, the one free,and the other subject to foreign domination. Thetribes who had so readily submitted to the Peru-vians Avere subjected to an annual tribute in gold,an imposition which they had never before expe-rienced ; but the conquerors, Avhether they darednot hazard the attempt, or were not able to effectit, never introduced their form of government intothese provinces. Of course, the subjected Chilians,as well as the free, preserved until the arrival ofthe Spaniards their original manners, which wereby no means so rude as many are led to imagine.

4. Agriculture . — Agriculture was already knoAvn

to them ; but being in Avant of animals to till theground, they were accustomed to turn it up witha spade made of hard wood. Tiie plants whicheither necessity or accident made known to them,Avere the maize, the the guegen, the tweer,

the quinoa, pulse of various kinds, the potato, theoxalis tuberosa, the common and the yellow pump-kin or gourd, the Guinea pepper, the madi, andthe great straAvberry. To these provisions of thevegetable kind, may be added the following of theanimal, the little rabbit, and the Chiliheuque orAraucaniau camel, Avhose flesh furnished excellentfood, and Avhose avooI, clothing for these people.If tradition may be credited, they had also the hogand the domestic fowl. With these productions,Avhich required a very moderate degree of indus-try, they subsisted comfortably, and even Avith adegree of abundance, considering the few thingsAvhich their situation rendered necessary. Subsist-ence, the source of population, being thus secured,the country became rapidly peopled under the in-fluence of so mild a climate ; Avhence it appears,that the first Avriters Avho treated of Chile, cannotliave greatly exaggerated in saying, that the Spa-niards found it filled Avith inhabitants.

5. Civilized state. — It is a fact that there was butone language spoken throughout the country ; a]

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[baptized, and made his page, instigated by sliamefor his countrymen, quitted the victorious party,and by encouragement and entreaties prevailedupon the Araucaniaiis to return to the conflict.Thus was changed the fate of the day : of theSpanish army only two Prornaucians had the for-tune to escape: and this may be considered anepoch in the liistory of Araucanian valour, notonly from the event of the battle itself, but as be-ing the dawn of that glory which ever after signa-lized the armies of that nation under the hap])yauspices of the Araucanian Hannibal, the greatandvaliant Lautaro.

11. Valdivia slain ; Lautnro appointed lieute-nant-general. — After the deatli of V^aldivia, whowas taken prisoner in the battle, and dispatchedby an old nlnien whilst pleading for his life in anassembly of ulmenes, the young Lautaro was ap-pointed lieutenant-general extraordinary to Can-polican, with the privilege of commanding inchief another army, which he intended to raise toprotect tlie frontiers from the invasion of the Spa-niards. In the mean time the Spanish inhabitantsof the City of the Frontiers and of Puren, think-ing themselves insecure within their walls, retiredto Imperial. The same was the case of those ofVillarica, who abandoned their houses, and tookrefuge in Valdivia. Thus had the Araucaniaiisonly these two places to attack. Caupolicanhaving determined to besiege them, committedto Lautaro the care of defending the n. fron-tier.

12. The mountain Mariguenu. — The youngvicc-toqui fortified himself upon the lofty moun-tain of Mariguenu, situated on the roatl whichleads to the province of Arauco, supposing, as ithappened, that the Spaniards, desirous of reveng-ing the death of their general, would take thatroad in search of Caupolican. This mountain,which on several occasions has proved fatal to theSpaniards, has on its summit a large plain inter-spersed with shady trees. Its sides are full ofclefts and precipices ; on the part towards thew. tlie sea beats with great violence, and thee. is secured by impenetrable thickets. A wind-ing bye-path on the n. was the only road thatled to the summit of the mountain.

13. The Governor Villagran . — Fillagran, wdiohad succeeded Valdivia in the government, w as notable to cope with the valour and militar\' prowessof Lautaro. Without entering into particulars ofa desperate battle Avhich w'as fought between thesetwo commanders, we shall content ourselves withobserving, that the result was the immediate eva-cuation of Concepcion ; as Villagran, thinking it

impossible to defend that city, embarked precipi-tately the old men, the women, and children, onboard of two ships which were then fortunately inthe harbour, with orders to the captains to con-duct part of them to Imperial, and part to Val-paraiso ; while with the rest of the inhabitants heproceeded by land to Santiago.

II. Concepcion destroyed . — Lautaro, on enter-ing the deserted city, found in it a very greatbooty, as its commerce and mines had rendered itvery opulent; and the citizens, more attentive tosave their lives than their riches, had, on their de-parture, taken scarcely any thing with them ex-cept a few provisions. After having burned thehouses, and razCd the citadel toils foundation, thevictor returned with his army to celebrate histriumph in Arauco. But although Lautarowas til us successful, Caupolican was obliged toraise the siege of Imperial and Valdivia ; theseplaces having had strong reinforcements throwninfo them by Villagran.

15. The small-pox appears. — It was at this aw-ful period, when he, availing himself of the ab-sence of his enemy, was ravaging the country inthe vicinity of Imperial, and burning the housesand crops, that the Araucanians were visited bytliat baneful enemy of mankind, the small-pox, sup-posed to have been communicated by some of theSpanish soldiers, who were either infected at thetime, or Avho had but recently recovered from it.It made the greatest ravages; and we hear thatof the several districts of the country there wasone whose population amounted to 12,000 per-sons, of which number not more than 100^escaped with life. This pestilential disorder had,to be sure, already made its appearance a fewyears before in some of the n. provinces, butthose of the s. had been for more than a cen-tury exempt from its ravages, from the precautionsemployed by the inhabitants (o prevent all com-munication with the infected countries. WhilstVillagran was employing all his attention in main-taining, as far as possible, the Spanish power, hisattentio!: was drawn off to the claims of FrancisAguirre, who, in Valdivia’s instructions, liadbeen named the second as governor ; and who, onlearning the death of that general, determined topossess himself of the government either by favouror force.

16. Decision o f the audience of Lima respectingthe governors. — His pretensions must infalliblyhave produced a civil war between Viliagran andhimself, had they not both consented to submittheir claims to the decision of the royal audienceof Lima. This court, whose jurisdiction at that]

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[order to practise his troops, and subsist them attlie expence of the enemy ; and after defeatingone of V^illagran’s sons, who, with n large force,

I came to give him battle, he marched against Ca-

nete ; but V^illagran, convinced of the imposibilityV of defending it, anticipated him by withdrawing

all the inhabitants, part of whom retired to Impe-rial, and part to Concepcion. The Araucanians, ontheir arrival, did not fail to destroy this city ; tlieyset it on lire, and in a short time it was entirelyconsumed.

i 33. Pedro Villagr an. -—In the mean time Vil-

lagran, more the victim of grief and mental anxietythan of his disoider, died, universally regretted bythe colonists, who lost in him a wise, humane,and valiant commander, to whose prudent con-duct they had been indebted for the preservationof their conquests. Before his death he ap-pointed as his successor, by a special commis-sion from the court, his eldest son Pedro, whose‘ mental endowments were no way inferior to hisfather’s. The death of the governor appeared toAntiguenu to present a fav;ourable opportunity toundertake some important enterprise. Havingformed his army, which consisted of 4000 men,into two divisions, he ordered one, under the com-mand of his vice-toqui, to lay siege to Concep-I cion, in order to attract thither the attention of the

1 Spaniards, while with the other he marched against

the fort of Arauco. The siege was protracted toa considerable length ; the commanders thereforedetermined to settle the affair by single combat;but after having fought, with the greatest obstinacyfor the space of two hours, they were separated bytheir men. But what force had not been able toeffect, was performed by famine. Several boats; loaded with provisions had repeatedly attempted

in vain to relieve the besieged : the vigilance ofthe besiegers opposed so insuperable an obstacle,|j| that Bernal, the commander, saw himself at length

'■ compelled to abandon the place. The Araucanians

J permitted the garrison to retire without molestation,

and contented themselves with burning the housesand demolishing the walls. The capture of An-gol, after that of Cahete and Arauco, appearedI easy to Antiguenu, but the attempt cost him his

I • life ; for after the most brilliant feats of valour andintrepidity, he was forced along with a crowd ofsoldiers who fled, and, falling from a high bank intoa river, Avas drowned.

34. The U'oqui Paillataru — Antiguenu had for' , successor in the toquiate Paillataru, the brother or

I cousin of the celebrated Lautaro. During the same

:i time a change was made of the Spanish governor.

Rodrigo de Quiroga, Avho bad been appointed to

’ ‘ VOI.. I.

that office by the royal audience of Lima, beganhis administration by arresting his predecessor,and sending him prisoner to Peru. Having re-ceived a reinforcement of 300 soldiers in 1665,he entered the Araucanian territory, rebuilt thefort of Arauco, and the city of Canete, con-structed a new fortress at the celebrated post ofQiiipeo, and ravaged the neighbouring provinces.Towards the end of the following year he sent theMarshal Ruiz Gamboa with 60 men to subject theinhabitants of the Archipelago of Chiloe ; thatofficer encountered no resistance, and founded inthe principal island the city of Castro and the portof Chacao.

35. Ar hipelago of Chiloe subjected ; descriptionof the same, iis inh(d)itanis, &c. — The islands ofthe Archipelago amount to 80, and have to all ap-pearance been produced by earthquakes, owingto the great number of volcanoes, with whichthat country formerly abounded. Every part ofthem exhibits the most unquestionable marks offire. Several mountains in the great island ofChiloe, which has given its name to the ArchipC'lago, are conqmsed of basaltic columns, whichsome authors s rongly urge could have been pro-duced only by the operation of fire. The nativeinhabitants, though descerided from the continentalChilians, as them appearance, their manners, andtheir language all evince, are nevertheless of a verydifferent character, being of a pacific, or rather atimid disposition. They made no opposition, aswe have already observed, to the handful of Spa-niards who came there to subjugate them, although^their population is said to have exceeded 70,000 ;nor have they ever attempted to shake off the yokeuntil the beginning of the last century, Avhen an in-surrection of no great importance was excited, andsoon quelled. The number of inhabitants at presentamounts to upwards of 11,000; they are dividedinto 76 districts or ulrnenates, the greater part ofwhich are subject to the Spanish commanders, andare obliged to render personal service for fifty daysin the year, according to the feudal laws, whichare rigidly observed in this province, notwithstand-ing they have been for a long time abolishedthroughout the rest of the kingdom. 'I'iieseislanders generally possess a quickness of'ctipacity,and very readily learn whatever is taught them.They haAm a genius for mechanical arts, an<l excelin carpentry, cabinet-making, and turnery, from thefrequent occasions Avhich they have to exercisethem, all their churches and houses being built ofwood. They are very good manufaefurersof linenand woollen, Avith which they mix the feathers ofsea-birds, and form beautitul coverings for their]

L

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[beds. From their swine, which are very nume-rous, they make excellent haras, the most esteemedof any in S. America. Notwithstanding thegreat quantity of timber taken from them, theseislands are covered with thick woods ; and as itrains there almost incessantly, the cultivatedgrounds continue w'et the whole year. From henceit follows that the inhabitants, although they havecattle, make no use of them for ploughing, but tillthe earth in a very singular manner. About threemonths- before sowing time they turn their sheepupon their lands, changing their situation everythree or four nights. When the field is sufficientlymanured in this manner, they strew the grain overit. One of their strongest men then attempts toharrow it by means of a machine formed of twolarge sticks of hard wood, made sharp, and fas-tened together, which he forces against the groundwith his breast, and thus covers the seed. Not-withstanding this imperfect tillage, a crop of wheatwill yield them ten or twelve for one. They alsoraisegreat quantities of barley, beans, peas, qidnoa^and potatoes, which are the largest and best of anyin Chile. From the excessive moisture of the at-mosphere, the grape never acquires sufficient ma-turity to be made into wine, but its want is suppliedby various kinds of cider, obtained from applesand other wild fruits of the country. The neces-sity they are under of often going from one islandto another, where the sea is far from deserving thename of the Pacific, renders the Chilotes excellentsailors. Their 'pirogues are composed of three orfive large planks seAved together, and caulked Avitha species of moss that groAvs on a shrub. Theseare in great numbers throughout the Avhole of theArchipelago, and are managed Avith sails and oars,and in these frail skiffs the natives Avill frequentlyventure as far as Concepcion : and here it maynot be improper to observe, that the Indians, Avhoform the principal part of the sailors of the S. seas,are very cictive and docile, and excellent seamen.These people are fond of fishing, an occupation towhich they are led from the great variety of fishwith which their coasts abound. Large quantitiesof these are dried and seiit to foreign countries.They likcAvisc dry the testaceous kinds, particularlythe conchs, the chimps, and thepfio’cs. P'or thispurpose they arrange them in a long trench, co-vering them Avith the targe leaves of the panlcetincloria. Over these they place stones, on Avhichthey make a hot fire for several hours. They thentake the roasted animals from their shells, andstring them upon threads, Avhich they hang forsome time in the smoke : in this manner they findthem to keep very well, and so carry them to Cujo,

and other places at a distance from the sea. Assoon as the Christian religion was preached inChiloe, it was readily embraced by the natives, whohave ever since continued faithful and obedient toits precepts. Their spiritual concerns are underthe direction of the bishop of Concepcion, andtheir temporal were administered by a governorappointed by the captain-general of Chile ; but in1792 it was vested in the viceroyalty of Lima.The Spaniards at present established in this Archi-pelago amount to about 15,000, and its commerceis conducted by means of three or four shipswhich trade there annually from Peru and Chile.These purchase of the natives large quantities ofred cedar boards, timber of different kinds, suitablefor carriages, upwards of 2000 ponchos of variousqualities, hams, pilchards, dried shell-fish, whitecedar boxes, cloaks, embroidered girdles, and asmall quantity of ambergris, which is found uponthe shores; giving in exchange wine, brandy, to-bacco, sugar, herb of Paraguay, salt, and severalkinds of European goods. Independently of theabove trade, Chiloe has of late years been made anentrepot of illicit commerce betAveen the Spanishcolonies, and English and N. American shipsengaged in the S. sea fishery.

36. The court of audience established . — But toreturn to our history, the continuation of the war,and the great importance of the conquest, finallyinduced Philip II. to erect a court of royal audi-ence in Chile, independent of that of Peru. Thissupreme tribunal, embracing the political, as Avellas military administration of the kingdom, andbeing composed of four judges of law, and a fiscal,made, on the 13th of August 1567, its solemn entryinto Concepcion, Avhere it fixed its residence. Im-mediately on assuming its functions, it remoA^edQuiroga from the government, and gave the com-mand of the army, Avith the title of general, to RuizGamboa. The military government of the royalaudience Avas soon found to be inadequate to thepurpose of its establishment, and accordingly DonMclehor de Bravo was, in 1568, invested with thetriple character of president, governor, and cap-tain-general of Chile. BetAveen him and Paillatarusome serious battles Avere fought, though not suchas to alter the general state of alfairs, when, untiltlie death of the latter commander, (a period ofabout four years), the tAvo belligerent nations ob-served a truce or suspension of arms. This Avasprobably OAving in a great measure to the generalconsternation caused by a dreadful earthquakewhich Avas felt throughout the country, and did greatinjury to the Spanish settlements, partieularly thecity of Concepcion, which Avas entirely destroyed.]

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Josie Brumfield
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