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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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finger, but of so hard a texture, that, when split, they cut exactly like a knife. These Indians speak the Tchicachan language, and with the other nations are in alliance against the Iroquees.

ABERCORN, a town of the province and colony of New Georgia, on the shore of the river Savannah, near where it enters the sea, and at a league's distance from the city of this name. [It is about 30 miles from the sea, 5 miles from Ebenezer, and 13 N W of Savannah.]

ABIDE, mountains, or serrania, of the province and government of Cartagena. They run from W to N E from near the large river of Magdalena to the province of Chocó, and the S. Sea. Their limits and extent are not known, but they are 20 leagues wide, and were discovered by Capt. Francisco Cesar in 1536; he being the first who penetrated into them, after a labour of 10 months, in which time he had to undergo the most extreme privations and excessive perils ; not that these exceeded the hardships which were endured by the licentiate Badillo, who entered upon its conquest with a fine army.

ABIGIRAS, a settlement of Indians, one of the missions, or a reduction, which belonged to the regular order of the Jesuits, in the province and government of Mainas, of the kingdom of Quito ; founded in the year 1665, by the father Lorenzo Lucero, on the shore of the river Curarari, 30 leagues from its mouth, and 240 from Quito.

[Abineau Port, on the N side of lake Erie, is about 13 miles W S W from fort Erie. Lat. 42° 6' N Long. 79° 15' W. ]

[ABINGDON, a town at the head of the tide waters of Bush river, Harford county, Maryland, 12 miles SW from Havre-de-Grace, and 20 NE from Baltimore. Cokesbury college, instituted by the methodists in 1785, is in this town. Lat. 39° 27' 30" N Long. 76° 20' 35" W.]

[another, the chief town of Washington county, Virginia, contained but about 20 houses in 1788, and in 1796 upwards of 150. It is about 145 miles from Campbell's station, near Holston; 260 from Richmond in Virginia, in a direct line, and 310 as the road runs, bearing a little to the S of W Lat. 36° 41' 30" N Long. 81° 59' W.]

[ABINGTON, a township in Plymouth county, Massachusetts; 22 miles SE from Boston, and contains 1453 inhabitants. Lat. 42° 4' 30". ]

[another, a parish in the town of Pomfret in Connecticut. Lat. 42° 4' 30". Long. 70° 51' 30".]

[another, a village in Pennsylvania, 32 miles N of Philadelphia.]

Abipi, a small settlement of the jurisdiction of Muzo, and corregimiento of Tunja, in the Nuevo Reyno de Granada. It is of a hot temperature, producing some wheat, maize, yucas, plantains, and canes ; it has been celebrated for its rich mines of emeralds, which are, however, at present abandoned from want of water; it is nearly three leagues distant from the large mine of Itoco.

ABIPONES, a nation of barbarous Indians, of the province and government of Tucuman, inhabiting the S shores of the river Bermejo. Their number once exceeded 100000; but they are certainly at present much reduced. They go naked, except that the women cover themselves with little skins, prettily ornamented, which they call queyapi. They are very good swimmers, of a lofty and robust stature, and well featured: but they paint their faces and the rest of their body, and are very much given to war, which they carry on chiefly against such as come either to hunt or to fish upon their territory. Their victims they have a custom of sticking upon lofty poles, as a landmark, or by way of intimidation to their enemies. From their infancy they cut and scarify their bodies, to make themselves hardy. When their country is inundated, which happens in the five winter months, they retire to live in the islands, or upon the tops of trees: they have some slight notion of agriculture, but they live by fishing, and the produce of the chase, holding in the highest estimation the flesh of tigers, which they divide among their relations, as a sort of precious relic or dainty ; also asserting that it has the properties of infusing strength and valour. They have no knowledge either of God, of law, or of policy; but they believe in the immortality of the soul, and that there is a land of consummate bliss, where they shall dance and divert themselves after their death. When a man dies, his widow observes a state of celibacy, and fasts a year, which consists in an abstinence from fish: this period being fulfilled, an assembly run out to meet her, and inform her that her husband has given her leave to marry. The women occupy themselves in spinning and sewing hides; the men are idlers, and the boys run about the whole day in exercising their strength. The men are much addicted to drunkenness, and then the women are accustomed to conceal their husband's weapons, for fear of being killed. They do not rear more than two or three children, killing all above this number.

Abisca, an extensive province of the kingdom of Peru, to the E of the Cordillera of the Andes, between the rivers Yetau and Amarumago, and to the S of Cuzco. It is little known, consisting entirely of woods, rivers, and lakes; and hither many barbarous nations of Indians have retired, selecting for their dwelling places the few plains which belong to the province. The Emperor Yupanqui endeavoured to make it subservient to his controul, but without success: the same disappointment awaited Pedro de Andia in his attempt to subjugate it in the year 1538.

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(CANISSEX, a small river of the district ofMaine.)

CANIOUIS, a race of Indians of the provinceand government of Louisiana, inhabiting the shoresof the river Akansas.

(CANNARES, Indians of the province ofQuito in Peru. They are very well made, andvery active ; they wear their hair long, whichthey weave and bind about their heads in form ofa crown. Their clothes are made of wool or cot-ton, and they wear fine fashioned boots. Theirwomen are handsome and fond of the Spaniards ;they generally till and manure the ground, whilsttheir husbands at home card, spin, and weavewool and cotton. Their country had many richgold mines, now drained by the Spaniards. Theland bears good wheat and barley, and has finevineyards. The magnificent palace of Theoma-bamba was in the country of the Cannares. SeeCANARIS.)

(CANNAVERAL Cape, the extreme point ofrocks on the e. side of the peninsula of E. Florida.It has Mosquitos inlet n. by w. and a large shoals. by e. This was the bounds of Carolina bycharter from Charles II. Lat. 28° 17' n. Long. 80° 20' w.')

(CANNAYAH, a village on the n. side ofWashington island, on the n. w. coast of N. Ame-rica.)

CANNES, Island of the, on the s. coast ofNova Scotia, between the islands La Cruz andLa Verde.

CANNESIS, a settlement of the province andgovernment of Louisiana, situate at the source ofthe river Rouge, or Colorado, with a fort built bythe French.

CANO, a settlement of the province and cor-regimiento of Huanta in Peru, annexed to thecuracy of its capital.

CANOA, a settlement of the province and go-vernment of Esmeraldas in the kingdom of Quito.

Canoa, a bay in one of the islands of the Cai-cos, directly to the w. of that of Caico Grande,looking immediately in that direction, and nearthe point of Mongon.

CANOCOTA, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Collahuas in Peru, annexed tothe curacy of Chibay.

CANOE, Islands of, in the river Mississippi,just opposite to where the river Roche runs into it.

(Canoe Ridge, a rugged mountain about 200miles w. of Philadelphia, forming the e. boundaryof Bald Eagle valley.)

CANOGANDl, a river of the province and

government of Chocó in the kingdom of TierraFirme. It rises in the sierras of Abide, runs tothe w. and enters the Paganagandi.

CANOMA or Guarihuma, or Guarihuma, a river of theprovince and country of the Amazonas, in thepart possessed by the Portuguese. It rises in theterritory of the Andirases Indians, and enters a kindof lake formed by different branches of the riverMadera.

CANONA, a lake of the province and countryof the Amazonas, in the territory of the Portuguese,and in one of those numerous islands which formthe arms of the river Madera, on the side of theisland of Topinambas.

(CANONNICUT Island, in Newport county,Rhode island, lies about three miles w. of New-port, the s. end of which, (called Beaver Tail,on which stands the light-house), extends aboutas far s. as the s. end of Rhode island. It extendsn. about seven miles, its average breadth beingabout one mile ; the e. shore forming the w. partof Newport harbour, and the w. shore being aboutthree miles from the Narraganset shore. On thispoint is Jamestown. It was purchased of the In-dians in 1657, and in 1678 was incorporated bythe name of Jamestown. The soil is luxuriant,producing grain and grass in abundance. James-town contains 507 inhabitants, including 16sIaves.)

(CANONSBURGH, a town in Washingtoncounty, Pennsylvania, on the n. side of the w.branch of Chartier’s creek, which runs n. by e.into Ohio river, about five miles below Pittsburg.In its environs are several valuable mills. Hereare about 50 houses and an academy, seven milesn. e. by e. of Washington, and 15 s. w. of Pitts-burg.)

CANOS, Blancos, a small river of the pro-vince and government of Paraguay, which runsn. and enters the Nanduygazu.

CANOT, a small river of Louisiana ; it runss. w. between the rivers Ailes and Oviscousin, andenters the Mississippi.

Canot, another river of N. Carolina. It runsto the n.w. and enters the Cherokees.

CANOTS, or Canoas, a river of the kingdomof Brazil, in the province and captainship of SanPablo. It rises near the coast opposite the islandof Santa Catalina, runs to the w. in a serpentinecourse, and serves as the source of the large riverUruguay.

CANSACOTO, a settlement of the kingdom ofQuito, in the corregimiento of the district calledDe las Cinco Leguas de su Capital.

CANSEAU, an island of Nova Scotia in N.

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belongs to the bishopric of La Paz, and is so situateas to have a fine view of the lake. It is a settle-ment at once the most pleasant and convenient,fertile, and abounding in fruits and cattle, butits temperature is excessively cold. It has twoparishes, with the dedicatory title of Santo Do-mingo and La Asuncion, and two hermitages de-dicated to St. Barbara and St. Sebastian. Theother settlements are,

Asiento de Minas de Mi- Asiento del Desagua-

chacani, dero,

Asiento de San Ante- Acora,

nio de Esquilache, Hi lave,

Pomata, *July,

Asiento de Huacullani, Santiago,

Zepita.

Same name, The lake of, which, although it bethus called, is also known by the name of Titicaca,is 51 leagues in length from n. w. to s. e. and 26in width, although in some parts less. On its shoresare six provinces or corregimientos^ which are.The province of this Paucarcolla,name, Lampa,Pacages, Asangaro.Omasuyos,This lake is of sufficient depth for vessels ofany size, since in many bays not far in from itsshores there are from four to six fathoms of water,and within it, some places from 40 to 50. It is, asfar as is ascertained, without any shoals or banks.Near it grow some herbs, called clacchos, eaten bythe cows and pigs ; also a great quantity of theherb called totora, or cat’s tail, which in someparts grows to the length of a yard and an half.Of this the Indians make rafts, not only for fishingbut for carrying to and fro the cattleand productionsof the harvest and crops growing in the variousislands lying in this lake. Some of these islandsare so covered and hemmed in with the herb totorathat it requires much force and labour to cut a pas-sage through it. In one of the largest of theseislands the Incas had a magnificent temple, dedi-cated to the sun, the first that was ever built. Thislake is not without its tempests and squalls ; theyare, on the contrary, frequent, and have at timescaused no inconsiderable mischief. Its watersare thick, but are nevertheless drank by the cattle,and even the Indians ; particularly by those ofthe nation of the Uros, who are a poor ignorantpeople, who formerly lived upon the islands ingreat wretchedness, and who by dint of great solici-tations have been prevailed upon to leave them forthe mainland^ where they now reside in some mi-serable caves, excavated places, or holes in theearth covered over with fiags of totora^ maintain-

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ing themselves by fishing. This lake containslikewise various kinds of fish, such as trout,ormantos, cuches, anchovies, and boquillas inabundance; these are, for the most part, aboutthe length of a man’s hand, and three fingersthick. The Indians of Yunguyo take upwardsof 700 yearly, and sell them at four and six dollarsthe thousand. They also catch some small peje-reyesy and an infinite variety of birds, which aresalted, and afford excellent food. It is confidentlyand repeatedly asserted by the Indians, that thegreater part of the riches of the country was throwninto this lake when the Spaniards entered it at thetime of the conquest ; and amongst other valuablesthe great gold chain made by the order of theInca Huayanacap, which was 2S3 yards in length,and within which 6000 men could dance.

CHUCURPU, an ancient settlement of warlikeIndians of the province and corregimiento ofCuzco in Peru. It lies to the e. of this city, andwas subjected and united to the empire after along resistance by Pachacutec, emperor of theIncas.

CHUCUTI, a river of the province and go-vernment of Darien in the government of TierraFirme. It rises in the mountains towards the e.and following this course, enters the Taranena at asmall distance from its source.

CHUDAUINAS, a barbarous nation of Indians of the kingdom of Quito, to the s, e. ofthis city. They inhabit the part lying s. w. ofthe river Pastaza, and are bounded on the s. e, bythe Ipapuisas, and w. by the Xibaros. They arenot numerous, owing to the continual wars whichthey have maintained with their neighbours ; andthough of a martial spirt, they are of a docile andhumane disposition. Some of them have 'Unitedthemselves with the Andoas, in the settlement ofthis name, which lies upon the w. shore of theriver Pastaza.

CHUECA, San Agustin de, a settlement ofthe province and corregimiento of Lipes, and archbi-shopric of Charcas, in Peru ; annexed to the cu-racy of San Christoval.

CHUETI, a river of the province and govern-ment of Choco. It rises in the sierras of Abide,runs w. and enters the Paganagandi.

CHUFIAS, a barbarous nation of Indians whoinhabit the e. of the river Aguaricu, bounded onthe n. w. by the nation of the Encabellados, withwhom they are in continual warfare.

CHUGOD, Santa Catalina de, a settlementof the province and corregimiento of Caxamarcain Peru, annexed to the curacy of Chetu.

CHUI, a river of the province and captainship3 o

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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 2]

Untitled Page 1

THE

GEOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL

DICTIONARY

OF

AMERICA AND THE WEST INDIES.

DAG DAM

Dabaiba, an imaginary and fabulous river, which some travellers would fain have to be in the mountains of Abide. Amongst the many rivers, however, which flow down from that cordillera, we find no one of this name in the ancient or mo- dern charts of the best geographers.

DABOYAN, a settlement of the province and government of Cinaloa== in ==Nueva España ; situate between the rivers Mayo== and Fuerte.

DACADMA, a lake of the province and country of the Amazonas, in the territory pos- sessed by the Portuguese. It is formed by an arm or waste- water of the river Marañon, which returns to enter that river, leaving this lake; and at a small distance from it is another, called Cudaja.

DACARRON, a large and convenient bay of the Malvine or Falkland isles, on the w. part of the principal one. Here the French peopled this settlement, and the castle of S. Louis, in 1763.

DACINO, a river of the province of Pasto in the kingdom of Quito, to the s. It runs from n. to s. and enters the Coca on the n. side, in lat. 30' s.

DADO, a small settlement or ward of the head settlement of Tlazintla, and ulculdia manor of Ix- miquilpan, in Nueva España.

DAEMA, a river of the province and govern- ment of Buenos Ayres. It is small, and runs e. [DAGSBOROUGH, a post-town in Sussex

YOL. II.

county, Delaware ; situated on the n. w. bank of Peper’s creek, a branch of Indian river, and con- tains about 40 houses. It is 19 miles from Broad hill, or Clowe’s, and 127 s. from Philadelphia.!

DAJABON, a river of the island of St. Do- mingo, in the part possessed’ by the French. It rises near the n. coast, runs n^n. w. and enters the sea in the bay of Manzanillo.

DALBY, a settlement of the island of Barba- does, in the district of the parish of St. Joseph ; situate near the w, coast.

DALES-GIFT, a city of the province and co- lony of Virginia.

[DALTON, a fine township in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, having Pittsfield on the w. ; and contains 554 inhabitants. The stage road from Boston to Albany runs through it. Dalton was incorporated in 1784, and lies 135 miles ay. by n. of Boston, and about 35 the same course from Northampton.]

[Dalton, a township in Grafton county. New Hampshire, first called Apthorpe, ivas incorporated in 1784, and has only 14 inhabitants. It lies on the e. bank of Connecticut river, at the Fifteen- mile falls, opposite Concord, in Essex county, Vermont.]

DAMAQUIEL, a river of the province and go- vernment of Darien in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the sierras or mountains of

Last edit about 2 years ago by Gimena
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