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Search for Caxamarquilla* CAXAMARQUILLA* "Caxamarquilla or Pataz" "Caxamarquilla"

The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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from six to 20 feet diameter, worn almost perfectlysmooth, into the solid body of a rock.]

(CAVIANA, an island in S. America, towardsthe n. w. side of Amazon river. Lat. 30' n.)

(CAVOGLIERO, a bay on the side of theisland of St. Domingo, at the mouth of the riverRomaine, 24 leagues e. of St. Domingo.)

CAXABAMBA, a settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Riobamba in the kingdom ofQuito.

Caxabamba, another settlement of the provinceand corregimiento of Huamachuco in Peru.

CAXACAI, a settlement of the province andcorregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru.

CAXAMARCA, a province and corregimientoof Peru, in the bishopric of Truxillo ; boundeds. e. by the province of Caxamarquilla, e. by thatof Chachapoyas, n.w. by that of Luya and Chil-Igos : all these three being situate at that part oft^e Maranon which serves as a limit to this pro-vince of Caxamarca. It is bounded ». by the pro-vince of Jaen, n. w. by that of Piura, w. by thatof Saha and by a part of Truxillo, and s. by thatof Huamachuco. It is in length 40 leagues froms. e. ion. w. ; and in breadth, or across, 36 leagues.To enter it through the province of Truxillo, whichis the grand road, it is necessary to pass the cordil-lera, which is not here so lofty as in the s. pro-vinces. This province, however, abounds witheminences which are branches of the cordillera;and on account of the height and situation ofthese, a great variety of temperature is experienced,some parts being subject to an intense heat, andothers to , a severe cold. Thus it partakes of thenature of the sierra, and its uneven figure no lesscorresponds with it : but it is for the most part of agood temperature, particularly in the capital. Theprovince abounds greatly in all kinds of fruits andcattle : in it are fabricated cloths, baizes, blankets,canvas for sails of ships, and cotton garments of aVery fine and excellent quality. Formerly its prin-cipal commerce was in swine ; at present it is not,though these animals still abound in some parts.It is watered by many rivers, of which those risingon the w. side of the cordillera, as the Sana, Lam-bay eque, and those passing through the provinceof Truxillo, all enter the S. sea. The others,amongst which that of the Criznejas is the largest,incoporate themselves with the Maranon. On itsshores are lavaderos, or washing-places of gold;and its rivers in general abound in very good andwholesome fish. Besides the fruits and the pro-ductions of every kind found in this province, ithas to boast many gold and silver mines, some ofwhich are worked. There a e also some of copper,

very fine lead, brimstone, and alcaparrosa. To-wards the n. part, where it touches the province ofJaen, are found some bark-trees, the production ofwhich, although not equal to the trees of Loxa, isof the colour of heated copper, and possesses allthe virtues of the common bark. Here are alsomany medicinal herbs, and amongst them the cele-brated calagimla. In the time of the Indians, andbefore the conquest, it was so well peopled that itsnatives formed upwards of 500 settlements. Atpresent they amount to 46,000, being divided into46 settlements. The capital bears the same title,and the repartimiento of the corregidor used toamount to 80,000 dollars, and it paid an alcavalaof 640 dollars per annum.

The settlements are.

Caxamarca, the ca-pital,

Santa Catalina,

San Pedro,

San Joseph,Cherillo,

Jesus,

Asuncion,

Contumaza,

Cascas,

Guzrnanga,

San Benito,

Trinidad de Chetu,S. Francisco doCay an,

Santa Cruz,

Pion,

Santa Catalina deChugod,

San Pablo de Cha-lique,

S. Luis de Tuniba-din,

S. Bernardino de

S. Juan de Llallan,Nepos,

Tinguis,

San Miguel de Pal-laques,

Celedin,

Sorocucho,

San Marcos,Catacachi,Amarcucho,Ichocan,

San Juan de Huam-bos,

Cochabamba,

Llama,

Cachen,

Cutervo,

Queracoto,

Chachopin,

Tocmocha,

Zocota,

Todos Santos deChota,Tacabamba,Yauyucan.

its figure is

Nice,

The capital is large and handsomeirregular, and it is situate upon a level plainT Thehouses are of clay, and the streets are wide andstraight. The parish church, Avhich has threenaves, is of finely worked stone, and the buildingexpences of it Avere defrayed by King Charles II.in the time of the viceroy the Duke of La Palata,in 1682. It has a parish of Spaniards, calledSanta Catalina ; two of Indians, which are SanPedro and San Joseph ; two convents of the orderof St. Francis, one of the Observers, and anotherof the Recoletans ; an hospital and a convent ofBethlemites, a monastery of nuns of La Concepcion,an house of entertainment of Nuestra Senora de

Last edit over 1 year ago by kmr3934
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dom ; annexed to the curacy of Pasco ; in whichis the celebrated mountain and mine of Lauri-cocha.

CAXAMARQUILLA Y COLLAOS, the territory ofthe missions which forms part of the former pro-vince, and which is a reduccion of the infidel moun-tain Indians, who have been converted by themonks of St. Francis: these Indians are main-tained by a portion paid by the kin«?’s procuratorout of the royal coffers at Lima. They dwell tothe e. of the province, and are reduced to foursettlements ; two of the Ibita, and two of the Cho-lona nation. It is now 90 years since their foun-dation, and the number of Indians may at presentamount to 2000. Those settlements are situateupon mountains covered with trees and thickwoods ; from whence the natives procure incense,cffCflo, resinous gums, oil of Maria, dragon’s blood,the reed called bejuco^ dried fish, honey, wax,monkeys, parrots, and macaws, whicli^ are thebranches of its commerce ; tliough not less so isthe coca plant, which they pack up in measures offour bushels each , and carry in abundance to differentparts, for the consumption of the whole province.The missionaries of the above order have madevarious attempts, and have spared neither painsnor labour in penetrating into the interior parts ofthe mountains ; having repeatedly discovered otherbarbarous nations, whom they would fain have re-duced to the divine knowledge of the gospel.

The aforesaid settlements are,

Jesus de Sion, San Buenaventura,

Jesus de Ochonache, Pisano.

CAXATAMBO, a province and corregimientoof Peru, bounded n. by that of Huailas, n. e. bythat of Conchuios, e. by that of Huamalies, s. e.by that of Tarma, s. by the part of Chancay calledChecras, s. e. by the low part of Chancay, and n.w. by that of Santa. It is in length 34 leagues n. e.s. w. and 32 in width n. w. s. e. ; the greaterpart of it is situate in a serrama. Its temperatureis consequently cold, except in the broken and un-even spots and in the low lands. Besides the pro-ductions peculiar to the serrama., this provinceabounds in all sorts of seeds and fruits; in allspecies of cattle, especially of the sheep kind, fromthe fleece of whicli its inhabitants manufacturemuch cloth peculiar to the country ; this beingthe principal source of its commerce. It producessome grain and cochineal, used for dyes ; and if thislatter article were cultivated, it would bring greatprofit. Amongst tlie mountains of this provincethere is one called Huilagirca of fine flint, and twomines of sulphur and alcaparrosa, articles employedin the colouring of wools, not only in this province,

VOL. I.

but in those of Huanuco, Huamalies, and Jauja:It has also mines of good yeso or gypsum. Theprincipal rivers by which it is irrigated, are twowhich rise in the same soil, and both of which enterthe S. sea, after having laved the contiguous pro-vinces ^ in former times there were fine silver mines,which are still worked, but for some reason or other,to very little profit. On the n. c. part, on some emi-nences, is a spot called Las Tres Cruces, (The ThreeCrosses), there being as many of these fixed up hereto determine its boundaries, and that of the pro-vince of Santa Huailas. Its population consists ofthe 69 following settlements : its repartimiento usedto amount to 1^0, (XX) dollars, and the akavala to1046 dollars per annum.

Caxatambo, the ca-

Cochas,

pital,

Huanchai,

Astobambas,

Gorgor,

Uicas,

Huucahori,

Mangas,

Palpay,

Ptiequian,

Chingos,

Copa,

Caxamarquili* de

Gorgorillo,

Gorgor,

Paellon,

Churin,

Chamas,

Huacho,

Nanis,

Curay,

Chiquian,

Tancur,

Huasta,

A cay a,

Acquia,

Rap;is,

Matara,

Pachangara,

Ticllos,

Palpas, distinct from

Roca,

the other,

Corpanqui,

Naba,

Llaclla,

Oyon,

Can is,

Tinta,

Caxamarquilla,

Mallay,

Rajan,

Andajes,

Hacas,

Chimba,

Carhuapampa,

Caras,

Pimachi,

Larcha,

Machaca,

Maui,

Chilcas,

Calpa,

Ocros,

Caujul,

Cheque,

Nabdn,

Congay,

Conchas,

Copa,

Ayndeo,

Caxacay,

Ambar,

Huaillacayan,

Cocharnarca,

Yaraor,

A^arocalla,

Raclla,

Huaca,

Colquios,

Quintai.

Caxatambo, a settlement and the capital of theformer province. Lat. 10° 27' s.

CAXHUACAN, S. Francisco de, a settle-ment of the head settlement of Teutalpan, and al-

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