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The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies [volume 1]

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[1803 amounted to 5,500,000, and the exports consisted of produce to the value of 4,000,000 dollars. He also states the population in 1808 at 900,000 souls. The receipts of Caracas, Guatemala, and Chile, are consumed within the country. The population of some of the chief cities is thus stated ; Caracas 40,000, La Guaira 6000, Puerto Cabello 7600, Coro 10,000. The harbour, or La Vela de Coro, as it is commonly called, and its environs, are supposed to contain not less than 2000. In 1797 three state prisoners were sent from Spain to Caracas, on account of their revolutionary propensities. Being treated with great indulgence by the officers and soldiers to whose care they were committed, they formed the project of a conspiracy against the government. They engaged a number of persons, some of them of consequence, in their party. After gaining their first converts, the spirit did not spread. The coldness and apathy of the people did not admit of the effervescene they desired. After the plot had been kept a secret for many months it was disclosed to the government. Some of the ringleaders escaped, and others were taken. It was found that seventy-two had entered into the conspiracy; six were executed. The rest either escaped, or were sent to the galleys or banished from the country. For an account of the recent revolution in Caracas, see Venezuela.]

Caracas, some islands of the N. sea near the coast of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, in the province and government of Cumana. They are six in number, all small and desert, serving as places of shelter to the Dutch traders, who carry on an illicit commerce on that coast.

Caracas, a small port of the coast of Tierra Firme, in the province and government of Vene;zuela, between the capital and cape Codera.

CARACHE, a settlement of the province and government of Maracaibo, situate n. of the city of Truxillo, on the shore of a small river which enters the Matazan.

CARACHIS, San Carlos de a settlement of the province and country of the Amazonas ; a reduccion of the missions which belonged to the abolished order of the Jesuits. It is at the mouth of the river Huerari, where this enters the Maranon.

CARACOA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Parinacoche in Peru, where there is a spring of warm medicinal water.

CARACOL, Port, on the coast of the S. sea, and of the province and government of Panamá ; it is near the point of Garachine, behind mount Zapo.

CARACOLI, a port of the coast of the kingdom of Tierra Firme, and of the province and government of Venezuela, to the w., of cape Codera.

Caracoli, a bay formed by the s. coast, in the province and government of Darien, of the kingdom of Tierra Firme ; it lies at the back of point Garachine.

Caracoli, a settlement of the province and government of Cartagena, situate on the shore of the Rio Grande de la Magdalena, and on the n, of the town of Maria.

CARACOLLO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Oruro in Peru, eight leagues distant from its capital.

=CARACOTO== a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lampa in Peru.

Caracoto, another, in the province and corregimienlo of Sicasica in the same kingdom.

==CARAGAIAS, a town of the island of Cuba, situate on the n. coast between Cadiz and Nizao,

CARAGUATAI, a river of the province and government of Buenos Ayres ; it runs s. s. w. and enters the Ayum or Yumeri.

CARAGUET, a small river of Nova Scotia or Acadia ; it runs e. and enters the sea in the gulf of St. Lawrence, opposite the island of its name.

CARAHUACRA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; annexed to the curacy ofYauli.

CARAIBAMBA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Aimaraez in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Chalvanca.

CARAIMA Alta, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Quillota in the kingdom of Chile ; situate on the coast between point Caraimilia and point Pena Blanca.

CARAIMILLA, a settlement on the coast of the province and corregimiento aforementioned, between point Caraima Alta, and the isle of Obispo.

CARAMA, a settlement of the province and government of Antioquia in the new kingdom of Granada.

CARAMANTA, a city of the province and government of Antioquia in the new kingdom of Gratiada ; founded by Sebastian de Benalcazar in 1543, near the river Cauca. Its temperature is hot and unhealthy, but it is fertile in maize, vegetables, grain, and abounds with herds of swine : near it are many small rivers which enter the Cauca, and some salt pits of the whitest salt. On the mountains within its jurisdiction, are some settlements of barbarian Indians very little known. This city is indifferently peopled, and is 65 leagues distant to the n. e. of Popayan, and 50 from Antioquia. Long. 75° 33' w. Lat. 5° 58' «.

CARAMATIBA, a settlement of the province and captainship of Rio Grande in Brazil ; situate on the shore of the river Carabatang.

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rection to be drowned in the lake Yaguarcocha, which from thence takes its name, and signifies the lake of blood, with which it was quite polluted ; tlie Indians stating, .according to their traditions, that no less than 20,000 people were thus sacrificed. Part of this province is at present comprehended in that of Ibarra, and part in that of Otavalo.

CARAP, a small river of the province and government of Guayana. It rises between the Acamon and the Agualey, and taking its course between these two, enters the Caroni on the e. side.

CARAPAICURA, a small river of the province and government of Cumana. It rises in the serranla of I mataca, runs and enters the Cuyuni on the n. side.

CARAPANATUBA, a river of the province of Guayana, in the part belonging to the Portuguese. It runs s. s. e. and enters the mouth of the Maranon before you come to the town and fort of Macapa.

CARAPATO, a river of the province and corregimiento of Sicasica. It is but small, rises to there), of the settlement of Caracoto, runs n. and enters the Cliuquiavo.

(CARAPEGUAY, a parish of the province and government of Paraguay, situate near a small river, 11 leagues 5. e. of Asuncion. Lat. 25° 45' 31" s. Long. 57° 16' 56" w.)

CARAPO, asettlement of the province of Guayana, and government of Cumana, one of those belonging to the missions of the Catalatxian Capuchin fathers.

CARAPO, a river of the province and government of San Juan de los Llanos in the new kingdom of Granada ; it rises in the country of the Chiricoas Indians, runs n. and enters the Meta.

CARAPU, a small river of the province and government of Guayana ; it rises near the lake Jeupa, runs from s. to n. and enters the Paragua.

CARAPUCHO, Morro de, a mountain on the coast of Peru, in the province and corregimiento of Carangas.

CARAQUES, Bay of, on the S. sea-coast, and in the province and government of Guayaquil. It is close to cape Pasao, and near the equinoctial line. There was a settlement here, bearing the same name, the ruins of which are still visible.

CARAQUET, a small island of the gulf of St. Lawrence, on tlie coast of Nova Scotia or Arcadia, by the Orphan’s bank.

CARARA, a small river of the province and captainship of Para in Brazil; it runs n. and enters the sea between the settlement of Senamboca and the island of San Juan.

CARARE, a large river of the new kingdom of Granada. It rises in the valley of Alferez, to the n. of the city of Tunja, runs from s. ton. and joining the Zarbe, enters the large river of Magdalena. On the e. side, near the narrow pass which forms its shores, the French have constructed a fort to guard against invasion from the infidel Indians.

CARARI, a strait of the large river Magdalena, formed by great rocks. There was formerly here a fort, which has been moved to a place at some little distance. The course of the waters in the above strait is so rapid as to render it sometimes impossible for vessels and canoes to pass through it.

==CARAS=, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Caxatambo in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Andajes.

CARASA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cochabamba in Peru.

CARASANI, asettlement of the province and corregmiento of Larecaja in Peru, annexed to the curacy of Combaya.

CARATE, a small island of the S. sea, near the coast.

CARATES, a river of the province and government of Maracaibo. It rises in the mountains of Lonia, runs s. w. and after many windings, enters the great lake of Maracaibo.

CARAVELAS, Mouth of the, the entrance of a bay on the n. coast of the island of Cuba.

CARAUELE, Point of the, an extremity of the coast looking to the e. in the island of Martinique, one of those two which run into the sea in the above direction.

Carauele, a small island of the N. sea, situate near the n. e. coast of the island of Martinique, on the n. side of Carauele point.

CARAUELI, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cumana in Peru.

CARAUELLES, a river of the province and captainship of Puerto Seguro in Brazil. It rises at the foot of the « Fria, and describing a small circle, runs s. e. and according to Cruz, e. and enters the sea opposite the island of Pajaros.

CARAZ, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huailas in Peru.

CARBET, a settlement of the island of Martinique, one of the Antilles ; situate on the n. s». coast, Avith a good port. It Avas a curacy of the regular order of Jesuits, now abolished.

Carbet, two very high mountains of the above island. They are full of sharp points similar to those on Montserrat in Cateluila. They are near the coast, lying towards the n. w. part ; and the French call them Pitons de Carbet.

Carbet, a point on the e. coast of the island

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escape the destruction which followed them whereever they fled. Still are the vestiges of this calamity to be seen, and there are large quantities of this mud or lava, now become hard, scattered on the s. side of the settlement.

CARHUA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Canta in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of its capital.

CARHUACAIAN, a settlement of the same province and corregimiento as the former ; annexed to the curacy of Pomacocha.

CARHUACALLANGA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Jauja in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Chongos.

CARHUACUCHO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Lucanas in Peru ; annexed to the curacy of Laramate.

CARHUAMAIO, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Tarma in Peru.

CARHUAPAMPA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huarochiri in Peru; annexed to the curacy of Lorenzo de Quinti.

Carhuapampa, another settlement of the province and corregimiento of Cajatambo in the same kingdom ; annexed to the curacy of Hacas.

CARHUAZ, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Huailas in Peru.

CARI, a river of the province and government of Cumaná in the kingdom of Tierra Firme. It rises in the Mesa (Table-land) de Guanipa, and runs s. being navigable to the centre of the province, and enters the Orinoco near the narrow part.

Cari, a settlement of the same province; one of those under the care of the religious order of S. Francisco, missionaries of Piritu. It is situate on the shore of the former river.

CARIAI, a small river of the country of the Amazonas, in the part possessed by the Portuguese. It is by no means a considerable stream, runs n. and enters the Xingu.

CARIACO, a large gulf of the coast of Tierra Firme, in the province and government of Curnana. It is also called, Of Curnana, from this -capital being built upon its shores. The bajr runs 10 or 12 leagues from w. to c. and is one league toroad at its widest part. It is from 80 to 100 fathoms deep, and the waters are so quiet as to resemble rather the waters of a lake than those of the ocean. It is surrounded by the serramasy or lofty chains of mountains, which shelter it from all winds excepting that of the n. e. which, blowing on it as it were through a straitened and narrow passage, it accustomed to cause a swell, especially from 10

m the morning until five in the evening, after which all becomes calm. Under the above circumstances, the larger vessels ply to windward ; and if the wind be very strong, they come to an anchor ou the one or other coast, and wait till the evening, when the land breezes spring up from the s. e. In this gulf there are some good ports and bays, viz. the lake of Obispo, of Juanantar, of Gurintar, and others.

Cariaco, a river of the same province and government, taking its rise from many streams and rivulets which rise in the serrania, and unite be. fore they flow into the valley of the same Uame. After it has run some distance over the plain, it is cut off' to water some cacao plantations, and then empties itself into the sea through the former gulf. In the winter great part of the capital, which is situate upon its banks, is inundated, and the river is tlien navigated by small barks or barges ; but in the summer it becomes so dry that there is scarcely water sufficient to nqvigate a canoe.

Cariaco, a small city of the same province, situate on the shore of the gulf. [This city (according to Depons) bears, in the official papers and in the courts of justice, the name of San Felipe de Austria. The population is only 6500, but every one makes such a good use of his time as to banish misery from the place. The production most natural to the soil is cotton, the beauty of which is superior to that of all Tierra Firme. This place alone furnishes annually more than 3000 quintals ; and besides cacao they grow a little sugar. Lat. 10° SO' n. Long. 63° 39' w.

(CARIACOU is the ehief of the small isles dependent on Granada island in the West Indies; situate four leagues from isle Rhonde, which is a like distance from the «. end of Granada. It contains 6913 acres of fertile and well cultivated land, producing about 1,000,000 lbs. of cotton, besides corn, yams, potatoes, and plaintains for the Negroes. It has two singular plantations, and a town called Hillsborough.)

CARIAMANGA, a settlement of the province and corregimiento of Loxa in the kingdom of Quito.

CARIATAPA, a settlement which belonged to the missions of the regular order of the Jesuits, in the province of Topia and kingdom of Nueva Vizcaya ; situate in the middle of the sierra of this name, and on the shore of the river Piastla.

CARIBABARE, a small settlement which belonged to the missions of the regular order of ths Jesuits, in the province and government of San Juan de los Llanos of the new kingdom of Granada.

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C A R I B E.

It was formerly a very rich tract of land, situate on the shore of the river Cazanare, a stream which crosses and stops the pass into the country and for this reason there was a considerable establishment formed here by persons who belonged to tlie curacy of Santa Rosa de Chire. Its temperature is hot, but it is very fertile, and abounds in productions, which serve to provide for the other settlements belonging to the same missions : at present it is under the care of the religious order of St. Domingo.

CARIBANA, a large country, at the present day called Guayana Maritania, or Nueva Andaiucia Austral. It extends from the mouth of the river Orinoco to the mouth of the Marahon ; comprehends the Dutch colonies of Esquibo, Surinam, and Berbice, and the French colony of Cayenne. It takes its name from the Caribes Indians, who inhabit it, and who are very fierce and cruel, although upon amicable terms with the Dutch. Nearly the whole of this province is uncultivated, full of woods and mountains, but watered by many rivers, all of which run for the most part from s. to e. and empty themselves into the sea ; although some flow from s. ton. and enter the Orinoco. The climate, though warm and humid, is healthy ; the productions, and the source of its commerce, are sugar-cane, some cacao, wild wax, and incense. The coast, inhabited by Europeans, forms the greater part of this tract of country, of which an account will be found under the respective articles.

Caribana, a port on the coast of Tierra Firme, in the province and government of Darien, at the entrance of the gulf of Uraba.

CARIBE, a small port of the coast of Tierra Firme, in the province and government of Venezuela, to the w. of cape Codera.

Caribe, Caribbee, or Charaibes, some islands close upon the shore of the province and government of Cumana, near the cape of Tres Puntas. [The Caribbee islands in the West Indies extend in a semicircular form from the island of Porto Rico, the easternmost of the Antilles, to the coast of S. America. The sea, thus inclosed by the main land and the isles, is called the Caribbean sea; and its great channel leads n. zo. to the head of the gulf of Mexico through the sea of Honduras. The chief of these islands are, Santa Cruz, Sombuca, Anguilla, St. Martin, St. Bartholomew, Barbuda, Saba, St. Eustatia, St. Christopher, Nevis, Antigua, Montserrat, Guadalupe, Dcseada, Mariagalante, Dominica, Martinica, St. Vincent, Barbadoes, and Grenada. These are again classed into Windward and Leeward isles bv

seamen, with regard to the usual courses of ships from Old Spain or the Canaries to Cartagena or New Spain and Porto Bello. The geographicaltablesand maps class them into Great and Little Antilles ; and authors vary much concerning this last distinction. See Antilles. The Charaibes or Caribbecs were the ancient natives of the Windward islands ; hence many geographers confine the term to these isles only. Most of these were anciently possessed by a nation of cannibals, the terror of the mild anti inotfensive inhabitants of Hispaniola, who frequently expressed to Columbus their dread of these fierce invaders. Thus, when these islands were afterwards discovered by that great man, they were denominated Charibbean isles. The insular Charaibs are supposed to be immediately descended from the Galibis Indians, or Charaibes of S. America. An ingenious and learned attempt to trace back the origin of the Caribes to some emigrants from the ancient hemisphere may be found in Bryan Edwards ; and it is to the valuable work of this author that we are indebted for the following illustrations of the manners and customs of this people. — The Caribes are avowedly of a fierce spirit and warlike disposition. Historians have not failed to notice these among the most distinguishable of their qualities. Dr. Robertson, in Note X Cl II. to the first vol. of hisHistory of America, quotes from a MS. History of Ferdinand and Isabella, Avrittenby Andrew Bernaldes, the cotemporary and friend of Columbus, the folloAving instance of the bravery of the Caribes : A canoe with four men, two Avomen, and a boy, unexpectedly fell in with Columbus’s fleet. A Spanish, bark with 25 men was sent to take them; and the fleet, in the mean time, cut off their communication with the shore. Instead of giving way to despair, the Caribes seized their arms with imdauntcd resolution, and began the attack, wounding several of the Spaniards, although they had targets as well as other defensive armour ; and even after the canoe was overset, it was with no little difficulty and danger that some of them Avere secured, as they continued to defend themselves, and to use their bows with great dexterity while swimming in the sea. Herrera has recorded the same anecdote. Restless, enterprising, and ardent, it would seem they considered war as the chief end of their creation, and the rest of the human race as their natural prey ; for they devoured, without remorse, the bodies of such of their enemies (the men at least) as fell into their hands. Indeed, there is no circumstance in the history of mankind better attested than the universal prevalence of these practices among them. Columbus was not]

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